Chushiel

Rabbi Hushiel ben ElhananḤushielḤushiel ben Elhanan
Chushiel ben Elchanan (also Ḥushiel) was president of the bet ha-midrash at Kairouan (alt: Kairwan), Tunisia toward the end of the 10th century.wikipedia
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Chananel ben Chushiel

HananeelRabbeinu ChananelR. Hananeel
Two of Chushiel's pupils were his son Hananeel and Nissim ben Jacob (see I.H. Weiss, Dor, iv.
R. Chananel studied under his father, Chushiel, head of the Kairouan yeshiva and through correspondence with Hai Gaon.

Nissim ben Jacob

Nissim GaonNissimRav Nissim Gaon
Two of Chushiel's pupils were his son Hananeel and Nissim ben Jacob (see I.H. Weiss, Dor, iv.
Rav Nissim studied at the Kairouan yeshiva, initially under his father - Jacob ben Nissim ("Rav Yaakov Gaon") who had studied under Hai Gaon - and then under Chushiel, whom he succeeded as head of the Yeshiva.

Shemariah ben Elhanan

Shemariah ben Elchanan
643) addressed to Shemariah ben Elhanan, chief rabbi of Cairo (supposed by Ibn Daud to have been captured with Ḥushiel), tends to show that Ḥushiel merely went to visit his friends in Middle Eastern countries, and was retained by the community of Kairouan.
Later, also, when Shemariah was the head of the yeshivah of Cairo, he was consulted by many rabbis from distant countries, and S. Schechter has published a long letter addressed to Shemariah by Ḥushiel of Kairwan, who, according to Abraham ibn Daud, was captured with Shemariah, and another letter, by an unknown rabbi, also addressed to Shemariah.

History of the Jews in Tunisia

Tunisian JewsTunisiaTunisian Jewish
His successor Chushiel ben Elchanan, originally from Bari, developed the simultaneous study of the Talmud of Babylon and the Jerusalem Talmud.

History of the Jews in Kairouan

KairouanJewish community
During his tenure, Rabbi Chushiel arrived in Kairouan from Italy, and upon Rabbi Yaakov ben Nissim's death, in 1006, succeeded him.

Beth midrash

beit midrashbeis medrashBeis Midrash
Chushiel ben Elchanan (also Ḥushiel) was president of the bet ha-midrash at Kairouan (alt: Kairwan), Tunisia toward the end of the 10th century.

Kairouan

QayrawanAl-QayrawanKairwan
Chushiel ben Elchanan (also Ḥushiel) was president of the bet ha-midrash at Kairouan (alt: Kairwan), Tunisia toward the end of the 10th century. Ḥushiel was sold as a slave in North Africa, but he and the other three rabbis were ransomed by Jewish communities in Alexandria, Cordoba, and Kairouan.

Tunisia

TUNTunisianRepublic of Tunisia
Chushiel ben Elchanan (also Ḥushiel) was president of the bet ha-midrash at Kairouan (alt: Kairwan), Tunisia toward the end of the 10th century.

10th century

10thOther events of the 12th centuryOther events of the 13th century
Chushiel ben Elchanan (also Ḥushiel) was president of the bet ha-midrash at Kairouan (alt: Kairwan), Tunisia toward the end of the 10th century.

Italy

ItalianITAItalia
He was born probably in Italy, but his origins and travels are obscure, and his eventual arrival in Kairwan is the subject of a well-known story.

Abraham ibn Daud

Ibn DaudAbraham ben DavidAbraham Ibn Da’ud
According to the Sefer Ha-Kabbalah of Abraham ibn Daud, Chushiel was one of the four scholars who were captured by Ibn Rumaḥis, an Arab admiral, while voyaging from Bari to Sebaste to collect money "for the dowries of poor brides."

Arabs

ArabArab peopleArabian
According to the Sefer Ha-Kabbalah of Abraham ibn Daud, Chushiel was one of the four scholars who were captured by Ibn Rumaḥis, an Arab admiral, while voyaging from Bari to Sebaste to collect money "for the dowries of poor brides."

Bari

Bari, Italy(BA)Barese
According to the Sefer Ha-Kabbalah of Abraham ibn Daud, Chushiel was one of the four scholars who were captured by Ibn Rumaḥis, an Arab admiral, while voyaging from Bari to Sebaste to collect money "for the dowries of poor brides."

Elaiussa Sebaste

SebasteAyaşElaiussa
According to the Sefer Ha-Kabbalah of Abraham ibn Daud, Chushiel was one of the four scholars who were captured by Ibn Rumaḥis, an Arab admiral, while voyaging from Bari to Sebaste to collect money "for the dowries of poor brides."

North Africa

Northern AfricaNorth AfricanNorth
Ḥushiel was sold as a slave in North Africa, but he and the other three rabbis were ransomed by Jewish communities in Alexandria, Cordoba, and Kairouan. It may therefore be the case that the story presented by ibn Daud is an etiological myth explaining the migration of Jewish centers of learning from Babylonia to Spain and North Africa.

Alexandria

Alexandria, EgyptAlexandrianAl-Iskandariyya
Ḥushiel was sold as a slave in North Africa, but he and the other three rabbis were ransomed by Jewish communities in Alexandria, Cordoba, and Kairouan.

Córdoba, Spain

CórdobaCordobaCórdoba, Andalusia
Ḥushiel was sold as a slave in North Africa, but he and the other three rabbis were ransomed by Jewish communities in Alexandria, Cordoba, and Kairouan.

Harkavy

On being ransomed, Ḥushiel went to Kairouan, an ancient seat of Talmudical scholarship (Harkavy, Teshubot ha-Ge'onim, Nos.

Jacob ben Nissim

Jacob b. NissimJacob ben Nissim ibn ShahinYaakov ben Nissim
J. C.'' i. 67 et seq.)—probably after the death of Jacob ben Nissim.

Cairo Geniza

Cairo GenizahGenizagenizah
However, an autograph letter from Ḥushiel (discovered in the Cairo Genizah and published by S. Schechter, J. Q. R. xi.

Solomon Schechter

S. SchechterSchechterSolomon Schecter
However, an autograph letter from Ḥushiel (discovered in the Cairo Genizah and published by S. Schechter, J. Q. R. xi.

Cairo

Cairo, EgyptCaireneAbbaseya
643) addressed to Shemariah ben Elhanan, chief rabbi of Cairo (supposed by Ibn Daud to have been captured with Ḥushiel), tends to show that Ḥushiel merely went to visit his friends in Middle Eastern countries, and was retained by the community of Kairouan.

Middle East

Middle Easternthe Middle EastMiddle-East
643) addressed to Shemariah ben Elhanan, chief rabbi of Cairo (supposed by Ibn Daud to have been captured with Ḥushiel), tends to show that Ḥushiel merely went to visit his friends in Middle Eastern countries, and was retained by the community of Kairouan.

Origin myth

founding mythfoundation mytheponymous ancestor
It may therefore be the case that the story presented by ibn Daud is an etiological myth explaining the migration of Jewish centers of learning from Babylonia to Spain and North Africa.

Babylonia

BabyloniansBabylonianBabylonian Empire
It may therefore be the case that the story presented by ibn Daud is an etiological myth explaining the migration of Jewish centers of learning from Babylonia to Spain and North Africa.