Chymical Wedding of Christian Rosenkreutz

The Chymical Wedding of Christian RosenkreutzChymical WeddingChymische Hochzeit Christiani Rosencreutz Anno 1459The Chemical Wedding of Christian RosenkreutzChemical Wedding of Christian RosenkreutzChymical Wedding of Christian Rosicross a.D. MCCCCLIXChymische HochzeitThe Alchemical Marriage of Christian RosycrossThe Chemical Wedding
The Chymical Wedding of Christian Rosenkreutz (Chymische Hochzeit Christiani Rosencreutz anno 1459) is a German book edited in 1616 in Strasbourg.wikipedia
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Christian Rosenkreuz

Christian RosenkreutzChristian RosencreutzChristian Rose Cross
It is an allegoric romance (story) divided into Seven Days, or Seven Journeys, like Genesis, and recounts how Christian Rosenkreuz was invited to go to a wonderful castle full of miracles, in order to assist the Chymical Wedding of the king and the queen, that is, the husband and the bride.

Fama Fraternitatis

FamaFama Fraternitatis RCfirst Manifesto
The Chymical Wedding is often described as the third of the original manifestos of the mysterious "Fraternity of the Rose Cross" (Rosicrucians), although it is markedly different from the Fama Fraternitatis and Confessio Fraternitatis in style and in subject matter.
Although Father C.R.C. is often identified as the allegorical character of Christian Rosenkreuz from the Chymical Wedding of Christian Rosenkreutz, the Fama Fraternitatis doesn't identify him as such in the text.

Johannes Valentinus Andreae

Johann Valentin AndreaeJohann Valentin AndreaIohann Andreae
Its anonymous authorship is attributed to Johann Valentin Andreae.
Johannes Valentinus Andreae (17 August 1586 – 27 June 1654), a.k.a. Johannes Valentinus Andreä or Johann Valentin Andreae, was a German theologian, who claimed to be the author of an ancient text known as the Chymische Hochzeit Christiani Rosencreutz anno 1459 (published in 1616, Strasbourg, as the Chymical Wedding of Christian Rosenkreutz).

Confessio Fraternitatis

C.F.
The Chymical Wedding is often described as the third of the original manifestos of the mysterious "Fraternity of the Rose Cross" (Rosicrucians), although it is markedly different from the Fama Fraternitatis and Confessio Fraternitatis in style and in subject matter.

Monas Hieroglyphica

Hieroglyphic Monad
The invitation to the royal wedding includes the Monas Hieroglyphica symbol associated with John Dee.
The Hieroglyph appears on a page of the Rosicrucian Manifesto Chymical Wedding of Christian Rosenkreutz, beside the text of the invitation to the Royal Wedding given to Rosenkreutz who narrates the work.

Rosicrucianism

RosicrucianRosicruciansRosicrucian Manifestos
The Chymical Wedding is often described as the third of the original manifestos of the mysterious "Fraternity of the Rose Cross" (Rosicrucians), although it is markedly different from the Fama Fraternitatis and Confessio Fraternitatis in style and in subject matter.
These were the Fama Fraternitatis RC (The Fame of the Brotherhood of RC, 1614), the Confessio Fraternitatis (The Confession of the Brotherhood of RC, 1615), and the Chymical Wedding of Christian Rosicross a.D. MCCCCLIX (1617).

Parabola Allegory

Bearing many similarities to The Chymical Wedding of Christian Rosenkreutz, it is steeped in alchemical imagery.

Herbert Silberer

SilbererSilberer, Herbert
Taking as his starting point a Rosicrucian text known as the Parabola Allegory, an alchemical writing with many parallels to the Chymical Wedding of Christian Rosenkreutz, he explores the ability of Freudian analysis to interpret it.

Hermeticism

HermeticHermetismHermetic philosophy
The sources dating the existence of the Rosicrucians to the 17th century are three German pamphlets: the Fama, the Confessio Fraternitatis, and The Chymical Wedding of Christian Rosenkreutz.

Jan van Rijckenborgh

Van Rijckenborgh propounded his own form of Gnostic Christianity based upon the Rosicrucian Manifestos, Johann Valentin Andreae's works The Chymical Wedding of Christian Rosenkreutz and Rei Christianopolotanae Descriptio and his own wide ranging explorations into hermeticism, alchemy, Freemasonry, the Cathars (thanks in part to his collaboration with neo-Cathar historian Antonin Gadal), Christian Gnosticism and other forms of esoteric study.

Strasbourg

StrassburgStraßburgStrasbourg, France
The Chymical Wedding of Christian Rosenkreutz (Chymische Hochzeit Christiani Rosencreutz anno 1459) is a German book edited in 1616 in Strasbourg.

Book of Genesis

GenesisGen.The Book of Genesis
It is an allegoric romance (story) divided into Seven Days, or Seven Journeys, like Genesis, and recounts how Christian Rosenkreuz was invited to go to a wonderful castle full of miracles, in order to assist the Chymical Wedding of the king and the queen, that is, the husband and the bride.

Alchemy

alchemistalchemicalalchemists
This manifesto has been a source of inspiration for poets, alchemists (the word "chymical" is an old form of "chemical" and refers to alchemy—for which the 'Sacred Marriage' was the goal) and dreamers, through the force of its initiation ritual with processions of tests, purifications, death, resurrection, and ascension and also by its symbolism found since the beginning with the invitation to Rosenkreutz to assist this Royal Wedding.

John Dee

Dr. John DeeDeeDr John Dee
The invitation to the royal wedding includes the Monas Hieroglyphica symbol associated with John Dee.

Bible

biblicalThe BibleChristian Bible
There is some resemblance between this alchemical romance and passages in the Bible such as:

Ezechiel Foxcroft

First English version appeared in 1690, by Ezechiel Foxcroft, followed by translations into many languages throughout time.

Easter

Easter SundayPaschaEaster Day
The story begins on an evening near Easter.

Freemasonry

FreemasonFreemasonsMasonic
It was on Easter-day 1459 that the Constitutions of the Freemasons of Strasburg was first signed in Regensburg, with a second signed shortly afterwards in Strasburg.

Gutenberg Bible

42-Line BibleBibleMazarin Bible
The Gutenberg Bible began printing in Mainz, Germany in 1455, and the first Bible in German, the Mentel Bible, was printed in Strasburg in 1466.

Bible translations into German

German Bible translationsBible in GermanBible into German
The Gutenberg Bible began printing in Mainz, Germany in 1455, and the first Bible in German, the Mentel Bible, was printed in Strasburg in 1466.

Synoptic Gospels

synoptic problemSynoptic GospelSynoptics
CRC believed that the Gospel of John is the only gospel that is historically plausible, and that it is the unleavened bread and its relationship to the Passover that truly divides John's gospel from the synoptic Gospels.