Cinema of the United Kingdom

BritishBritish filmBritish film industryUnited KingdomBritish cinemaBritish filmsUKthe United KingdomEnglishEnglish film
The United Kingdom has had a significant film industry for over a century.wikipedia
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Michael Caine

Sir Michael CaineAlfredCained
Many British actors have achieved worldwide fame and critical success, such as Maggie Smith, Roger Moore, Michael Caine, Sean Connery, Daniel Day-Lewis, Gary Oldman, Emma Thompson and Kate Winslet.
He has appeared in more than 130 films in a career spanning 70 years and is considered a British film icon.

Cinema of the United States

HollywoodAmericanHollywood films
The identity of the British industry, particularly as it relates to Hollywood, has often been the subject of debate.
While the national cinemas of the United Kingdom (299), Canada (206), Australia, and New Zealand also produce films in the same language, they are not considered part of the Hollywood system.

BFI Top 100 British films

Top 100 British films100 greatest British films of the 20th centurygreatest British film of all time
The British Film Institute has produced a poll ranking what they consider to be the 100 greatest British films of all time, the BFI Top 100 British films.
In 1999, the British Film Institute surveyed 1,000 people from the world of British film and television to produce the BFI 100 list of the greatest British films of the 20th century.

Charles Urban

Urban Trading Company
In 1898 American producer Charles Urban expanded the London-based Warwick Trading Company to produce British films, mostly documentary and news.
Charles Urban (April 15, 1867 – August 29, 1942) was an Anglo-American film producer and distributor, and one of the most significant figures in British cinema before the First World War.

Cecil Hepworth

Cecil M. HepworthHepworth
Also in 1898 Hepworth Studios was founded in Lambeth, South London by Cecil Hepworth, the Bamforths began producing films in Yorkshire, and William Haggar began producing films in Wales. In 1903, Cecil Hepworth and Percy Stow directed Alice in Wonderland, the first film adaptation of Lewis Carroll's children's book Alice's Adventures in Wonderland.
He was among the founders of the British film industry and continued making films into the 1920s at his Walton Studios.

Islington Studios

IslingtonGainsborough's Islington StudiosIslington Film Studios
In 1920 Gaumont opened Islington Studios, where Alfred Hitchcock got his start, selling out to Gainsborough Pictures in 1927.
Islington Studios, often known as Gainsborough Studios, were a British film studio located on the south bank of the Regent's Canal, in Poole Street, Hoxton in the former Metropolitan Borough of Shoreditch, London between 1919 and 1949.

Cricklewood Studios

Stoll Film StudiosCricklewoodmain studio
Also in 1920 Cricklewood Studios was founded by Sir Oswald Stoll, becoming Britain's largest film studio, known for Fu Manchu and Sherlock Holmes film series.
Cricklewood Studios, also known as the Stoll Film Studios, were British film studios located in Cricklewood, London which operated from 1920 to 1938.

The Clue of the New Pin (1929 film)

The Clue of the New Pina film in 1929Clue of the New Pin
Earlier in 1929, the first all-talking British feature, The Clue of the New Pin was released.
The Clue of the New Pin is a 1929 British crime film directed by Arthur Maude and starring Benita Hume, Kim Peacock, and Donald Calthrop.

The Drum (1938 film)

The DrumDrumsThe Drum'' (1938 film)
Korda's films before the war included Things to Come, Rembrandt (both 1936) and Knight Without Armour (1937), as well as the early Technicolour films The Drum (1938) and The Four Feathers (1939).
The Drum (released in the U.S. as Drums) is a 1938 British Technicolor film from the book The Drum by A. E. W. Mason.

Powell and Pressburger

Michael Powell and Emeric PressburgerPowell & PressburgerThe Archers
The war years also saw the emergence of The Archers partnership between director Michael Powell and the Hungarian-born writer-producer Emeric Pressburger with films such as The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp (1943) and A Canterbury Tale (1944).
The British film-making partnership of Michael Powell (1905–1990) and Emeric Pressburger (1902–1988)—together often known as The Archers, the name of their production company—made a series of influential films in the 1940s and 1950s.

A Canterbury Tale

Alison Smith (A Canterbury Tale)The Canterbury Tales
The war years also saw the emergence of The Archers partnership between director Michael Powell and the Hungarian-born writer-producer Emeric Pressburger with films such as The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp (1943) and A Canterbury Tale (1944).
A Canterbury Tale is a 1944 British film by Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger starring Eric Portman, Sheila Sim, Dennis Price and Sgt. John Sweet; Esmond Knight provided narration and played several small roles.

The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp

Life and Death of Colonel Blimp
The war years also saw the emergence of The Archers partnership between director Michael Powell and the Hungarian-born writer-producer Emeric Pressburger with films such as The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp (1943) and A Canterbury Tale (1944).
The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp is a 1943 romantic drama war film written, produced and directed by the British film making team of Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger.

Cinematograph Films Act 1927

quota quickiequota quickiesquota film
The Slump of 1924 caused many British film studios to close, resulting in the passage of the Cinematograph Films Act 1927 to boost local production, requiring that cinemas show a certain percentage of British films.
The Cinematograph Films Act of 1927 (17 & 18 Geo. V) was an act of the United Kingdom Parliament designed to stimulate the declining British film industry.

Eady Levy

Eady planEady Scheme
The Eady Levy, named after Sir Wilfred Eady was a tax on box office receipts in the United Kingdom in order to support the British Film industry.
The Eady Levy was a tax on box-office receipts in the United Kingdom, intended to support the British film industry.

Brothers in Law (film)

Brothers in Lawa film in 1957Brothers in Law'' (film)
The writer/director/producer team of twin brothers John and Roy Boulting also produced a series of successful satires on British life and institutions, beginning with Private's Progress (1956), and continuing with (among others) Brothers in Law (1957), Carlton-Browne of the F.O. (1958), and I'm All Right Jack (1959).
Brothers in Law is a 1957 British comedy film directed by Roy Boulting and starring Richard Attenborough, Ian Carmichael, Terry-Thomas and Jill Adams.

Karel Reisz

These individuals, principally Karel Reisz, Lindsay Anderson and Tony Richardson, were also involved in the short lived Oxford film journal Sequence and the "Free Cinema" documentary film movement.
Karel Reisz (21 July 1926 – 25 November 2002) was a Czech-born British filmmaker who was active in post–World War II Britain, and one of the pioneers of the new realist strain in British cinema during the 1950s and 1960s.

J. Arthur Rank

J Arthur RankJ. Arthur Rank, 1st Baron RankJoseph Arthur Rank
Towards the end of the 1940s, the Rank Organisation, founded in 1937 by J. Arthur Rank, became the dominant force behind British film-making, having acquired a number of British studios and the Gaumont chain (in 1941) to add to its Odeon Cinemas.
When the Methodist Times newspaper began to complain about the negative influence that British and American films shown in Britain were having on family life, their editorial was answered by the London Evening News who suggested that instead of complaining, the Methodist Church should provide a solution.

Spy film

spyespionage filmespionage
The series' success led to a spy film boom with many Bond imitations.
It is a significant aspect of British cinema, with leading British directors such as Alfred Hitchcock and Carol Reed making notable contributions and many films set in the British Secret Service.

Swinging Sixties

Swinging London1960sSwinging 60s
As the 1960s progressed, American studios returned to financially supporting British films, especially those that capitalised on the "swinging London" image propagated by Time magazine in 1966.
Swinging London also reached British cinema, which, according to the British Film Institute, "saw a surge in formal experimentation, freedom of expression, colour, and comedy".

Amicus Productions

AmicusAmicus FilmsAmicus horror movies
The British horror film cycle associated with Hammer Film Productions, Amicus and Tigon drew to a close, despite attempts by Hammer to spice up the formula with added nudity and gore.
Amicus Productions was a British film production company, based at Shepperton Studios, England, active between 1962 and 1977.

Performance (film)

PerformancePerformance'' (film)Terner
More relaxed censorship also brought several controversial films, including Nicolas Roeg and Donald Cammell's Performance, Ken Russell's The Devils (1971), Sam Peckinpah's Straw Dogs (1971), and Stanley Kubrick's A Clockwork Orange (1971) starring Malcolm McDowell as the leader of a gang of thugs in a dystopian future Britain.
It received a mixed critical response initially, but since then its reputation has grown in stature; it is now regarded as one of the most influential and innovative films of the 1970s as well as in British cinema.

Alice in Wonderland (1903 film)

Alice in Wonderland1903Alice in Wonderland'' (1903 film)
In 1903, Cecil Hepworth and Percy Stow directed Alice in Wonderland, the first film adaptation of Lewis Carroll's children's book Alice's Adventures in Wonderland.

British Film Institute

BFIThe British Film InstituteBFI Film Fund
The British Film Institute has produced a poll ranking what they consider to be the 100 greatest British films of all time, the BFI Top 100 British films.

Confessions of a Window Cleaner

ConfessionsConfessions...Window Cleaner
Some British producers, including Hammer, turned to television for inspiration, and big screen versions of popular sitcoms like On the Buses (1971) and Steptoe and Son (1972) proved successful with domestic audiences, the former had greater domestic box office returns in its year than the Bond film, Diamonds Are Forever and in 1973, an established British actor Roger Moore was cast as Bond in, Live and Let Die, it was a commercial success and Moore would continue the role for the next 12 years.Low-budget British sex comedies included the Confessions of ... series starring Robin Askwith, beginning with Confessions of a Window Cleaner (1974).
It was adapted for the screen in the 1970s, when the British film industry produced a large number of film adaptations of literary works.

Ealing Studios

Associated Talking PicturesEalingABFD
In 1902 Ealing Studios was founded by Will Barker, becoming the oldest continuously-operating film studio in the world.