Cinnamon

cinnamon stickscinnamon barkcinnamon treecinnamon stickCassia CinnamoncaneelcannelcinammonCinnamancinnammon
Cinnamon is a spice obtained from the inner bark of several tree species from the genus Cinnamomum.wikipedia
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Spice

spicesspicyspicy food
Cinnamon is a spice obtained from the inner bark of several tree species from the genus Cinnamomum.
The spice trade developed throughout the Indian subcontinent and Middle East by at earliest 2000 BCE with cinnamon and black pepper, and in East Asia with herbs and pepper.

Cinnamomum

carpano treescassiacinnamon plant
Cinnamon is a spice obtained from the inner bark of several tree species from the genus Cinnamomum.
The inner bark of several species is used to make the spice, cinnamon.

Cinnamaldehyde

cinnamic aldehydealdehydealdehyde cinnamal
The aroma and flavour of cinnamon derive from its essential oil and principal component, cinnamaldehyde, as well as numerous other constituents, including eugenol.
Occurring naturally as predominantly the trans (E) isomer, it gives cinnamon its flavor and odor.

Eugenol

2-methoxy-4-(2-propenyl)phenol4-Allylguaiacol
The aroma and flavour of cinnamon derive from its essential oil and principal component, cinnamaldehyde, as well as numerous other constituents, including eugenol.
It is a colorless to pale yellow, aromatic oily liquid extracted from certain essential oils especially from clove oil, nutmeg, cinnamon, basil and bay leaf.

Cuisine

cuisinesviandculinary
Cinnamon is used mainly as an aromatic condiment and flavouring additive in a wide variety of cuisines, sweet and savoury dishes, breakfast cereals, snackfoods, tea and traditional foods.
Dating back to the ancient spice trade, seasonings such as cinnamon, cassia, cardamom, ginger, and turmeric were important items of commerce in the earliest evolution of trade.

Spice trade

spice routespicespepper trade
Its source was kept mysterious in the Mediterranean world for centuries by those in the spice trade to protect their monopoly as suppliers.
Spices such as cinnamon, cassia, cardamom, ginger, pepper, and turmeric were known and used in antiquity for commerce in the Eastern World.

Cinnamomum verum

Cinnamomum zeylanicumCeylon cinnamonCinnamon
Cinnamomum verum is sometimes considered to be "true cinnamon", but most cinnamon in international commerce is derived from the related species Cinnamomum cassia, also referred to as "cassia".
Although the inner bark of several other Cinnamomum species is also used to make cinnamon, cinnamon from C. verum is considered of superior quality.

Lauraceae

laurellaurelslaurel family
All are members of the genus Cinnamomum in the family Lauraceae.

Essential oil

essential oilsvolatile oilaromatic plant
The aroma and flavour of cinnamon derive from its essential oil and principal component, cinnamaldehyde, as well as numerous other constituents, including eugenol.

Cinnamon bird

Cinnamolgus
Herodotus and other authors named Arabia as the source of cinnamon: they recounted that giant "cinnamon birds" collected the cinnamon sticks from an unknown land where the cinnamon trees grew and used them to construct their nests, and that the Arabs employed a trick to obtain the sticks.
The cinnamon bird, also known as Cinnamologus, Cinomolgus, or Cynnamolgus is a mythical creature described in various bestiaries as a giant bird that collected cinnamon to build its nests.

Myrrh

myrhhhealing oilmhyrr
According to Herodotus, both cinnamon and cassia grew in Arabia, together with incense, myrrh, and labdanum, and were guarded by winged serpents.
It is combined with such herbs as notoginseng, safflower petals, angelica sinensis, cinnamon, and salvia miltiorrhiza, usually in alcohol, and used both internally and externally.

East India Company

British East India CompanyHonourable East India CompanyEnglish East India Company
In 1767, Lord Brown of the British East India Company established Anjarakkandy Cinnamon Estate near Anjarakkandy in the Cannanore district of Kerala; it became Asia's largest cinnamon estate.
When she was brought in to Dartmouth she was the largest vessel that had been seen in England and her cargo consisted of chests filled with jewels, pearls, gold, silver coins, ambergris, cloth, tapestries, pepper, cloves, cinnamon, nutmeg, benjamin (a tree that produces frankincense), red dye, cochineal and ebony.

Dutch East India Company

VOCDutch East Indies CompanyDutch
The Dutch East India Company continued to overhaul the methods of harvesting in the wild and eventually began to cultivate its own trees.
In 1640, the VOC obtained the port of Galle, Ceylon, from the Portuguese and broke the latter's monopoly of the cinnamon trade.

Sri Lanka

CeylonCeyloneseDemocratic Socialist Republic of Sri Lanka
Cinnamomum verum, which translates as 'true cinnamon', is native to India, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, and Myanmar.
In the 19th and 20th centuries, Sri Lanka became a plantation economy famous for its production and export of cinnamon, rubber, and Ceylon tea, which remains a trademark national export.

Cinnamomum burmannii

C. burmanniiBatavia cassiaPadang cassia
Cinnamomum burmannii (or Cinnamomum burmanni), also known as Indonesian cinnamon, Padang cassia, Batavia cassia, or korintje, is one of several plants in the genus Cinnamomum whose bark is sold as the spice cinnamon.

Cinnamon sugar

cinnamoncinnamon-sugar
In the United States, cinnamon and sugar are often used to flavour cereals, bread-based dishes, such as toast, and fruits, especially apples; a cinnamon-sugar mixture is sold separately for such purposes.
Cinnamon sugar is a mixture of ground cinnamon and granulated sugar used as a spice to flavor foods such as Belgian waffles, Snickerdoodle cookies, tortillas, coffee cake, French toast, and churros.

Pickling

pickledpicklepickles
Cinnamon can also be used in pickling and Christmas drinks such as eggnog.
Antimicrobial herbs and spices, such as mustard seed, garlic, cinnamon or cloves, are often added.

Cinnamon roll

cinnamon buncinnamon rollscinnamon buns
Cassia induces a strong, spicy flavour and is often used in baking, especially associated with cinnamon rolls, as it handles baking conditions well.
Its main ingredients are flour, cinnamon, sugar, and butter, which provide a robust and sweet flavor.

Coppicing

coppicecoppicedcopse
Cinnamon is cultivated by growing the tree for two years, then coppicing it, i.e., cutting the stems at ground level.
Coppicing may be practiced to encourage specific growth patterns, as with cinnamon trees which are grown for their bark.

India

IndianRepublic of IndiaIND
Cinnamomum verum, which translates as 'true cinnamon', is native to India, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, and Myanmar.
The latter includes lentils, pulses and vegetables spiced commonly with ginger and garlic, but also more discerningly with a combination of spices that may include coriander, cumin, turmeric, cinnamon, cardamon and others as informed by culinary conventions.

Turkish cuisine

TurkishTurkeyTurkish food
It is also used in Turkish cuisine for both sweet and savoury dishes.

Kerala

Kerala stateKerala, Indiastate of Kerala
In 1767, Lord Brown of the British East India Company established Anjarakkandy Cinnamon Estate near Anjarakkandy in the Cannanore district of Kerala; it became Asia's largest cinnamon estate.
Coconut, tea, coffee, cashew, and spices—including cardamom, vanilla, cinnamon, and nutmeg are the main agricultural products.

Cinnamon challenge

The objective of the challenge is to film oneself eating a spoonful of ground cinnamon in under 60 seconds without drinking anything, then upload the video to the Internet.

Cinnamomea

Cinnamomea (disambiguation)
Cinnamomea, cinnamomeus, or cinnamomeum is a New Latin adjective meaning cinnamon-colored that occurs in the species names of many organisms.

Rhapta

Indonesian rafts transported cinnamon directly from the Moluccas to East Africa (see also Rhapta), where local traders then carried it north to Alexandria in Egypt.
Miller notes that ancient authorities (e.g. Herodotus 3.111) state that cinnamon and cassia bark were harvested in Africa, yet these species until recently were found only in Southeast Asia.