Circle of latitude

parallelparallelscircles of latitudeparallel of latitudeparallels of latitude28th parallel northlatitude circleshifts northwardcircles of constant latitudelatitudinal circle
A circle of latitude on Earth is an abstract east–west circle connecting all locations around Earth (ignoring elevation) at a given latitude.wikipedia
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Equator

equatorial planeThe Equator
Circles of latitude are unlike circles of longitude, which are all great circles with the centre of Earth in the middle, as the circles of latitude get smaller as the distance from the Equator increases.
The equator of a rotating spheroid (such as a planet) is the parallel (circle of latitude) at which latitude is defined to be 0°.

60th parallel north

60th parallel60° north60°N
The 60th parallel north or south is half as long as the Equator (disregarding Earth's minor flattening by 0.3%).
The 60th parallel north is a circle of latitude that is 60 degrees north of Earth's equator.

60th parallel south

60°S60° South60
The 60th parallel north or south is half as long as the Equator (disregarding Earth's minor flattening by 0.3%).
The 60th parallel south is a circle of latitude that is 60 degrees south of the Earth's equatorial plane.

West

W(West)Germany
A circle of latitude on Earth is an abstract east–west circle connecting all locations around Earth (ignoring elevation) at a given latitude.
Moving continuously west is following a circle of latitude.

Arctic Circle

circumpolarArcticCircumpolar arctic
By definition, the positions of the Tropic of Cancer, Tropic of Capricorn, Arctic Circle and Antarctic Circle all depend on the tilt of the Earth's axis relative to the plane of its orbit around the sun (the "obliquity of the ecliptic").
The Arctic Circle is one of the two polar circles and the most northerly of the five major circles of latitude as shown on maps of Earth.

Tropic of Capricorn

Capricorn23.44° southsouth
By definition, the positions of the Tropic of Cancer, Tropic of Capricorn, Arctic Circle and Antarctic Circle all depend on the tilt of the Earth's axis relative to the plane of its orbit around the sun (the "obliquity of the ecliptic").
The Tropic of Capricorn (or the Southern Tropic) is the circle of latitude that contains the subsolar point on the December (or southern) solstice.

Antarctic Circle

AntarcticcircumpolarAntarctic regions
By definition, the positions of the Tropic of Cancer, Tropic of Capricorn, Arctic Circle and Antarctic Circle all depend on the tilt of the Earth's axis relative to the plane of its orbit around the sun (the "obliquity of the ecliptic").
The Antarctic Circle is the most southerly of the five major circles of latitude that mark maps of the Earth.

Geographical zone

zonesfive climatic zonesmid latitudes
These circles of latitude, excluding the Equator, mark the divisions between the five principal geographical zones.
The five main latitude regions of the Earth's surface comprise geographical zones, divided by the major circles of latitude.

Tropic of Cancer

Cancertropic23.44° north
By definition, the positions of the Tropic of Cancer, Tropic of Capricorn, Arctic Circle and Antarctic Circle all depend on the tilt of the Earth's axis relative to the plane of its orbit around the sun (the "obliquity of the ecliptic").
These tropics are two of the five major circles of latitude that mark maps of Earth; the others being the Arctic and Antarctic Circles and the Equator.

70th parallel north

70°N70 degrees North70° N
The 70th parallel north is a circle of latitude that is 70 degrees north of the Earth's equatorial plane, in the Arctic.

Equirectangular projection

equirectangulargeographic projectionCarte parallelogrammatique projection
On an equirectangular projection, centered on the equator, the circles of latitude are horizontal, parallel, and equally spaced.
The projection maps meridians to vertical straight lines of constant spacing (for meridional intervals of constant spacing), and circles of latitude to horizontal straight lines of constant spacing (for constant intervals of parallels).

52nd parallel north

52°N52°N52nd parallel
The 52nd parallel north is a circle of latitude that is 52 degrees north of the Earth's equatorial plane.

Parallel 54°40′ north

54-4054°40'N54°40′ N latitude
Parallel 54°40′ north is a line of latitude between the 54th and 55th parallels north that forms the southernmost boundary between the U.S. State of Alaska and the Canadian Province of British Columbia.

51st parallel north

51° N51st parallel51°
The 51st parallel north is a circle of latitude that is 51 degrees north of the Earth's equatorial plane.

49th parallel north

49th parallel49° N49° north
Roughly half the length of border between the United States and Canada follows 49°N.
The 49th parallel north is a circle of latitude that is 49° north of Earth's equator.

48th parallel north

48th parallel48°N48 degrees north
The 48th parallel north is a circle of latitude that is 48 degrees north of the Earth's equatorial plane.

Mercator projection

MercatorMercator mapMercator chart
For instance, on a Mercator projection the circles of latitude are more widely spaced near the poles to preserve local scales and shapes, while on a Gall–Peters projection the circles of latitude are spaced more closely near the poles so that comparisons of area will be accurate.
As in all cylindrical projections, parallels and meridians on the Mercator are straight and perpendicular to each other.

46th parallel north

46th parallel46° N46°N
The 46th parallel north is a circle of latitude that is 46 degrees north of the Earth's equatorial plane.

45th parallel north

45th parallel45 degrees north latitude45°N
The 45th parallel north is a circle of latitude that is 45 degrees north of Earth's equator.

43rd parallel north

43° N43°N43 degrees north
The 43rd parallel north is a circle of latitude that is 43 degrees north of the Earth's equatorial plane.

Map projection

projectionequal-areacartographic projection
On a map, the circles of latitude may or may not be parallel, and their spacing may vary, depending on which projection is used to map the surface of the Earth onto a plane.
A normal cylindrical projection is any projection in which meridians are mapped to equally spaced vertical lines and circles of latitude (parallels) are mapped to horizontal lines.

42nd parallel north

42nd parallel42°42° N
The 42nd parallel north is a circle of latitude that is 42 degrees north of the Earth's equatorial plane.

41st parallel north

41°41°N41st parallel
For instance, the northern border of Colorado is at 41°N while the southern border is at 37°N.
The 41st parallel north is a circle of latitude that is 41 degrees north of the Earth's equatorial plane.

40th parallel north

40th parallel40°N40° N
The 40th parallel north is a circle of latitude that is 40 degrees north of the Earth's equatorial plane.

38th parallel north

38th parallel38°N38 degrees North
The 38th parallel north is a circle of latitude that is 38 degrees north of the Earth's equatorial plane.