Cirrhosis

cirrhosis of the liverliver cirrhosisliver fibrosishepatic cirrhosishepatic fibrosisalcoholic cirrhosiscirrhosis of livercirrhoticAdvanced liver diseaseAlcoholic liver cirrhosis
Cirrhosis, also known as liver cirrhosis or hepatic cirrhosis, is a condition in which the liver does not function properly due to long-term damage.wikipedia
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Ascites

ascitic fluidBulging flanksChylous ascites
As the disease worsens, a person may become tired, weak, itchy, have swelling in the lower legs, develop yellow skin, bruise easily, have fluid build up in the abdomen, or develop spider-like blood vessels on the skin.
In the developed world, the most common cause is liver cirrhosis.

Liver cancer

liverliver tumourcancer of the liver
Other serious complications include hepatic encephalopathy, bleeding from dilated veins in the esophagus or dilated stomach veins, and liver cancer.
The leading cause of liver cancer is cirrhosis due to hepatitis B, hepatitis C or alcohol.

Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis

spontaneously infected
The fluid build-up in the abdomen may become spontaneously infected.
Ascites is most commonly a complication of cirrhosis of the liver.

Hepatitis C

Chepatitis-CHCV
Cirrhosis is most commonly caused by alcohol, hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.
Over many years however, it often leads to liver disease and occasionally cirrhosis.

Alcoholism

alcoholicalcoholicsalcohol
Cirrhosis is most commonly caused by alcohol, hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.
This can result in mental illness, Wernicke–Korsakoff syndrome, irregular heartbeat, an impaired immune response, liver cirrhosis and increased cancer risk, among other diseases.

Esophageal varices

oesophageal varicesvaricesdilated blood vessels in the esophagus
Other serious complications include hepatic encephalopathy, bleeding from dilated veins in the esophagus or dilated stomach veins, and liver cancer.
They are most often a consequence of portal hypertension, commonly due to cirrhosis; people with esophageal varices have a strong tendency to develop severe bleeding which left untreated can be fatal.

Hepatic encephalopathy

hepatic comaencephalopathyhepatic
Other serious complications include hepatic encephalopathy, bleeding from dilated veins in the esophagus or dilated stomach veins, and liver cancer.
More than 40% of people with cirrhosis develop hepatic encephalopathy.

Jaundice

Obstructive jaundiceicteruscholestatic jaundice
As the disease worsens, a person may become tired, weak, itchy, have swelling in the lower legs, develop yellow skin, bruise easily, have fluid build up in the abdomen, or develop spider-like blood vessels on the skin.
High conjugated bilirubin may be due to liver diseases such as cirrhosis or hepatitis, infections, medications, or blockage of the bile duct.

Primary biliary cholangitis

primary biliary cirrhosisbiliary cirrhosischolestatic liver disease
A number of less common causes of cirrhosis include autoimmune hepatitis, primary biliary cholangitis, hemochromatosis, certain medications, and gallstones.
Further slow damage to the liver tissue can lead to scarring, fibrosis, and eventually cirrhosis.

Gastric varices

Gastric variceal obliterationstomachdilated stomach veins
Other serious complications include hepatic encephalopathy, bleeding from dilated veins in the esophagus or dilated stomach veins, and liver cancer.
They are most commonly found in patients with portal hypertension, or elevated pressure in the portal vein system, which may be a complication of cirrhosis.

Fibrosis

fibroticscarringfibrogenic
This damage is characterized by the replacement of normal liver tissue by scar tissue.
The scans also found that 2.4% had the liver scarring of fibrosis, which can lead to cirrhosis.

Liver

hepaticliver protein synthesislivers
Cirrhosis, also known as liver cirrhosis or hepatic cirrhosis, is a condition in which the liver does not function properly due to long-term damage.
In the disorders of cirrhosis and portal hypertension, the umbilical vein can open up again.

Portal hypertension

high blood pressure in the portal systemincreased pressures in the portal vein circulationliver condition
These signs and symptoms may be either a direct result of the failure of liver cells, or secondary to the resultant portal hypertension.
Cirrhosis (a form of chronic liver failure) is the most common cause of portal hypertension; other, less frequent causes are therefore grouped as non-cirrhotic portal hypertension.

Gallstone

gallstonescholelithiasisgall stones
A number of less common causes of cirrhosis include autoimmune hepatitis, primary biliary cholangitis, hemochromatosis, certain medications, and gallstones.
Risk factors for gallstones include birth control pills, pregnancy, a family history of gallstones, obesity, diabetes, liver disease, or rapid weight loss.

Autoimmune hepatitis

autoimmune liver diseaseautoimmune active chronic hepatitisautoimmune chronic hepatitis
A number of less common causes of cirrhosis include autoimmune hepatitis, primary biliary cholangitis, hemochromatosis, certain medications, and gallstones.
This abnormal immune response results in inflammation of the liver, which can lead to further symptoms and complications such as fatigue and cirrhosis.

Hypoalbuminemia

hypoalbuminaemiaLow albuminlow blood albumin levels
Patients often present with hypoalbuminemia as a result of another disease process such as sepsis, cirrhosis in the liver, nephrotic syndrome in the kidneys, or protein-losing enteropathy in the gastrointestinal tract.

Hepatorenal syndrome

kidney malfunction and increased liver insufficiency
The hepatorenal syndrome is defined as a urine sodium less than 10 mmol/L and a serum creatinine > 1.5 mg/dl (or 24 hour creatinine clearance less than 40 ml/min) after a trial of volume expansion without diuretics.
Hepatorenal syndrome (often abbreviated HRS) is a life-threatening medical condition that consists of rapid deterioration in kidney function in individuals with cirrhosis or fulminant liver failure.

Portacaval anastomosis

caval systemCongested anastomosesportosystemic anastomosis
In portal hypertension, as in the case of cirrhosis of the liver, the anastomoses become congested and form venous dilatations.

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

non-alcoholic steatohepatitisnonalcoholic fatty liver diseasenonalcoholic steatohepatitis
Cirrhosis is most commonly caused by alcohol, hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.
It may lead to complications such as cirrhosis, liver cancer, liver failure, or cardiovascular disease.

Hepatitis B virus

HBVhepatitis BB
In addition to causing hepatitis, infection with HBV can lead to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma.

Alcoholic liver disease

alcohol-related liver diseaseliver diseasealcohol
Alcoholic liver disease is a term that encompasses the liver manifestations of alcohol overconsumption, including fatty liver, alcoholic hepatitis, and chronic hepatitis with liver fibrosis or cirrhosis.

Alcoholic hepatitis

It is usually found in association with fatty liver, an early stage of alcoholic liver disease, and may contribute to the progression of fibrosis, leading to cirrhosis.

Primary sclerosing cholangitis

sclerosing cholangitisCholangitis, primary sclerosingcholangitis, sclerosing
Rarely are diseases of the bile ducts, such as primary sclerosing cholangitis, causes of cirrhosis.
Eventually, it can lead to cirrhosis of the liver and liver failure.

HFE hereditary haemochromatosis

hemochromatosishereditary hemochromatosishaemochromatosis
A number of less common causes of cirrhosis include autoimmune hepatitis, primary biliary cholangitis, hemochromatosis, certain medications, and gallstones.
The most susceptible organs include the liver, adrenal glands, heart, skin, gonads, joints, and the pancreas; patients can present with cirrhosis, polyarthropathy, adrenal insufficiency, heart failure, or diabetes.

Iron overload

haemochromatosisiron overload disorderhemochromatosis
The presence of cirrhosis increases the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma.