A report on Cloud and Cirrus cloud

400x400px
Sky containing different types of cirrus clouds
Stratocumuliform cloudscape
A vast shield of cirrus clouds accompanying the west side of Hurricane Isabel
Tropospheric cloud classification by altitude of occurrence: Multi-level and vertical genus-types not limited to a single altitude level include nimbostratus, cumulonimbus, and some of the larger cumulus species.
White cirrus in an anvil cloud
Cumulus humilis clouds in May
High cloud weather map symbols
Windy evening twilight enhanced by the Sun's angle, can visually mimic a tornado resulting from orographic lift
Cirrus clouds merging to cirrocumulus clouds
Nimbostratus cloud producing precipitation
Circumhorizontal arc
Cirrus fibratus clouds in March
Heights of various cloud genera including high-, mid-, and low-level clouds
Stratocumulus over Orange County.
Large field of cirrocumulus clouds
Stratocumulus cloud
Cirrostratus cloud
Cumulus humilis clouds
Cirrus clouds on Neptune, captured during Voyager 2 's flyby
Cumulonimbus cloud over the Gulf of Mexico in Galveston, Texas
High cirrus upper-left merging into cirrostratus and some cirrocumulus upper right
A large field of cirrocumulus
Sunrise scene giving a shine to an altocumulus stratiformis perlucidus cloud (see also 'species and varieties')
Altostratus translucidus near top of photo merging into altostratus opacus near bottom
Cumulus humilis clouds over Jakarta, Indonesia
Stratocumulus stratiformis perlucidus over Galapagos, Tortuga Bay (see also 'species and varieties')
Stratus nebulosus translucidus
Deep multi-level nimbostratus cloud covering the sky with a scattered layer of low stratus fractus pannus (see also 'species' and 'supplementary features' sections)
Cumulus humilis and cumulus mediocris with stratocumulus stratiformis perlucidus in the foreground (see also 'species and varieties')
Towering vertical cumulus congestus embedded within a layer of cumulus mediocris: Higher layer of stratocumulus stratiformis perlucidus.
Progressive evolution of a single cell thunderstorm
Isolated cumulonimbus cloud over the Mojave Desert, releasing a heavy shower
Altocumulus lenticularis forming over mountains in Wyoming with lower layer of cumulus mediocris and higher layer of cirrus spissatus
Example of a castellanus cloud formation
Cumulus mediocris cloud, about to turn into a cumulus congestus
A layer of stratocumulus stratiformis perlucidus hiding the setting sun with a background layer of stratocumulus cumulogenitus resembling distant mountains.
Cirrus fibratus radiatus over ESO's La Silla Observatory
Altocumulus stratiformis duplicatus at sunrise in the California Mojave Desert, USA (higher layer orange to white; lower layer grey)
Cumulus partly spreading into stratocumulus cumulogenitus over the port of Piraeus in Greece
Cumulonimbus mother cloud dissipating into stratocumulus cumulonimbogenitus at dusk
Cirrus fibratus intortus formed into a Kármán vortex street at evening twilight
Global cloud cover, averaged over the month of October 2009. NASA composite satellite image.
Lenticular nacreous clouds over Antarctica
Noctilucent cloud over Estonia
Joshua Passing the River Jordan with the Ark of the Covenant (1800) by Benjamin West, showing Yahweh leading the Israelites through the desert in the form of a pillar of cloud, as described in
Stratocumulus stratiformis and small castellanus made orange by the sun rising
An occurrence of cloud iridescence with altocumulus volutus and cirrocumulus stratiformis
Sunset reflecting shades of pink onto grey stratocumulus stratiformis translucidus (becoming perlucidus in the background)
Stratocumulus stratiformis perlucidus before sunset. Bangalore, India.
Late-summer rainstorm in Denmark. Nearly black color of base indicates main cloud in foreground probably cumulonimbus.
Particles in the atmosphere and the sun's angle enhance colors of stratocumulus cumulogenitus at evening twilight
Total cloud cover fraction averaged over the years 1981-2010 from the CHELSA-BIOCLIM+ data set

Cirrus (cloud classification symbol: Ci) is a genus of high cloud made of ice crystals.

- Cirrus cloud

The main representative cloud types for each of these forms are stratiform, cumuliform, stratocumuliform, cumulonimbiform, and cirriform.

- Cloud
400x400px

6 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Altostratus radiatus cloud showing distinctive parallel bands

Altostratus cloud

1 links

Altostratus radiatus cloud showing distinctive parallel bands
Sun shines dimly though the translucidus variant of altostratus clouds
Diagram of a warm front
Heights of various cloud genera including high-, mid-, and low-level clouds
Cirrostratus cloud
Altocumulus clouds
Stratus cloud

Altostratus is a middle-altitude cloud genus made up of water droplets, ice crystals, or a mixture of the two.

Cirrus and altostratus clouds and are the top two sources of this heating effect.

Different air masses that affect North America, as well as other continents, tend to be separated by frontal boundaries.

Warm front

1 links

Density discontinuity located at the leading edge of a homogeneous warm air mass, and is typically located on the equator-facing edge of an isotherm gradient.

Density discontinuity located at the leading edge of a homogeneous warm air mass, and is typically located on the equator-facing edge of an isotherm gradient.

Different air masses that affect North America, as well as other continents, tend to be separated by frontal boundaries.
A surface weather analysis for the United States on October 21, 2006. Note the warm front in the northwest Gulf of Mexico.

As it cools, any water vapor that is present will condense and form extensive cloud cover.

The first clouds that indicate an approaching warm front tend to be mostly high cirrus at first, changing to cirrostratus as the front approaches.

High cloud weather map symbols

Cirrocumulus cloud

0 links

High cloud weather map symbols
Cirrocumulus clouds on a summer afternoon
Cirrocumulus undulatus clouds

Cirrocumulus is one of the three main genus-types of high-altitude tropospheric clouds, the other two being cirrus and cirrostratus.

Luke Howard

0 links

British manufacturing chemist and an amateur meteorologist with broad interests in science.

British manufacturing chemist and an amateur meteorologist with broad interests in science.

A depiction of a cumulostratus cloud, included in Howard's 'On the modification of clouds'
English Heritage Blue plaque – 7 Bruce Grove, Tottenham, London

His lasting contribution to science is a nomenclature system for clouds, which he proposed in an 1802 presentation to the Askesian Society.

Howard named the three principal categories of clouds – cumulus, stratus, and cirrus, as well as a series of intermediate and compound modifications, such as cirrostratus and cirrocumulus, in order to accommodate the transitions occurring between the forms.

Contrails of a Boeing 747-400 from Qantas at 11000 m

Contrail

0 links

Contrails of a Boeing 747-400 from Qantas at 11000 m
A vintage P-40 Warhawk with propeller tip vortex condensation
MODIS tracking of contrails generated by air traffic over the southeastern United States
The sky above Würzburg without contrails after air travel disruption in 2010 (left) and with regular air traffic and the right conditions (right)
A distrail is the opposite of a contrail
Multiple contrails above Nova Scotia
Contrails formed due to two jets crossing over
Airliner contrails, some new, some old, dispersed by wind shear
A contrail over southwest Virginia
A contrail casting a shadow onto a lower cloud layer
Airplane contrail
Over the City of Culture of Galicia
Distrail --- a narrow line of clearance produced by a passing airplane, here produced in a patch of thin cirrostratus.
Distrail splits stratocumulus cloud - remnants of contrail visible (see annotations on Wiki Commons description page)
Iridescent contrails from a Boeing 747, when the sun shines through a group of similarly sized water droplets at a relatively small angle
An Airbus A340 of Lufthansa produces contrails
Two USAF F-15s approaching Soviet MiG-29s
Contrails in front of the sun
Engine exhaust contrails behind an Airbus A340 from Swiss International Air Lines
B-17 bombers over Europe, 1944
USAAF 8th Air Force B-17s and their contrails
The unique Antonov 225 had distinctive sextuple vapor trails
Virga falling from contrail

Contrails (short for "condensation trails") or vapor trails are line-shaped clouds produced by aircraft engine exhaust or changes in air pressure, typically at aircraft cruising altitudes several miles above the Earth's surface.

Depending on the temperature and humidity at the altitude the contrails form, they may be visible for only a few seconds or minutes, or may persist for hours and spread to be several miles wide, eventually resembling natural cirrus or altocumulus clouds.

Cumulus clouds seen from above

Cumulus cloud

0 links

Cumulus clouds seen from above
Lines of Cumulus clouds over Brittany
Some cumulus mediocris clouds
Cumulus congestus clouds compared against a cumulonimbus cloud in the background
A large field of cirrocumulus clouds
Altocumulus clouds
Stratocumulus clouds

Cumulus clouds are clouds which have flat bases and are often described as "puffy", "cotton-like" or "fluffy" in appearance.

However, at the same time, they heat the earth by around 7 C-change by reflecting emitted radiation, an effect largely caused by cirrus clouds.