Citizenship of the European Union

European Union citizensEuropean citizenscitizens of the European UnionEU citizenscitizen of the European UnionEU citizenshipEU citizencitizensEuropean citizenshipEuropean Union
Citizenship of the European Union (EU) is afforded to qualifying citizens of European Union member states.wikipedia
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European Union

EUEuropeanEurope
Citizenship of the European Union (EU) is afforded to qualifying citizens of European Union member states.
The EU and European citizenship were established when the Maastricht Treaty came into force in 1993.

Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union

Charter of Fundamental RightsEU Charter of Fundamental RightsCFREU
EU citizens enjoy the legal protections of EU law, including the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union and acts and directives regarding, for example, protection of personal data, rights of victims of crime, preventing and combating trafficking in human beings, equal pay, protection from discrimination in employment on grounds of religion or belief, sexual orientation and age.
The Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union (CFR) enshrines certain political, social, and economic rights for European Union (EU) citizens and residents into EU law.

European Citizens' Initiative

provision for a petitiona petition carrying one million signaturesCitizens' Initiative
Citizens have the right to vote in and run as a candidate in local elections in the country where they live, European elections and European Citizens' Initiative.
The initiative enables one million citizens of the European Union, who are nationals of at least one quarter of the member states, to call directly on the European Commission to propose a legal act in an area where the Member States have conferred powers onto the EU level.

European Parliament

EU ParliamentEP constituencyMEP
The Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union provides for citizens to be "directly represented at Union level in the European Parliament" and "to participate in the democratic life of the Union" (Treaty on the European Union, Title II, Article 10).
Since 1979, it has been directly elected every five years by European Union citizens, using universal suffrage.

Treaties of the European Union

Article 21 of the EU TreatyEU treatiestreaties
The Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union provides for citizens to be "directly represented at Union level in the European Parliament" and "to participate in the democratic life of the Union" (Treaty on the European Union, Title II, Article 10).
Article 9 establishes the equality of national citizens and citizenship of the European Union.

Freedom of movement for workers in the European Union

rights of free movementfreedom of movement for workersfreedom of movement
European Union citizens have the right to free movement, settlement and employment across the EU.
It also clarifies procedural issues, and it strengthens the rights of family members of European citizens using the freedom of movement.

Institutions of the European Union

EU institutionsinstitutionsEuropean institutions
They represent nearly 500 million citizens (the world's second largest democratic electorate) and form the only directly elected body in the Union.

European Ombudsman

OmbudsmanOmbudsman for the European UnionOmbudsman of the European Union
The EU has an office of European Ombudsman whom EU citizens can approach directly.
It is a right of an EU citizen, according to the EU treaties, to take a case to the Ombudsman.

Malta

MalteseMaltese IslandsRepublic of Malta
Following the 2007 enlargement, all pre-2004 member states except Finland and Sweden imposed restrictions on Bulgarian and Romanian citizens, as did two member states that joined in 2004: Malta and Hungary.
People who are eligible to vote in the election of the Maltese House of Representatives as well as resident citizens of the EU are eligible to vote.

European Commission

EU CommissionCommissionEC
This is in contrast to the Council of the European Union, which represents governments, the European Parliament, which represents citizens, the Economic and Social Committee, which represents organised civil society, and the Committee of the Regions, which represents local and regional authorities.

Treaty of Rome

TFEUTreaties of RomeTEC
The 1951 Treaty of Paris establishing the European Coal and Steel Community established a right to free movement for workers in these industries and the 1957 Treaty of Rome provided for the free movement of workers and services.
Articles 20 to 24 establishes EU citizenship and accords rights to it; to free movement, consular protection from other states, vote and stand in local and European elections, right to petition Parliament and the European Ombudsman and to contact and receive a reply from EU institutions in their own language.

Special member state territories and the European Union

Overseas Countries and Territoriesoutermost regionoutermost regions
In practice this means that a member state may withhold EU citizenship from certain groups of citizens, most commonly in overseas territories of member states outside the EU.
Natives of the collectivities are European citizens owing to their French citizenship and elections to the European Parliament are held in the collectivities.

European Communities

European CommunityECEuropean Communities (EC)
Prior to the 1992 Maastricht Treaty, the European Communities treaties provided guarantees for the free movement of economically active persons, but not, generally, for others.

Czech nationality law

Czech citizenshipcitizen of the Czech RepublicCzech
Every Czech citizen is also a citizen of the European Union.

Jersey

Bailiwick of JerseyIsle of JerseyIsland of Jersey
In contrast, British citizens in the Crown Dependencies of Jersey, Guernsey and the Isle of Man have always been considered to be EU citizens but, unlike residents of the British overseas territories, are prohibited from exercising EU free movement rights under the terms of the UK Accession Treaty if they have no other connection with the UK (e.g. they have lived in the UK for five years, were born in the UK, or have parents or grandparents born in the UK) and have no EU voting rights.
British citizens who have only a connection to Jersey, and not with the United Kingdom or another member state of the European Union, are not considered by the Jersey States to be European Union citizens.

British Overseas Territories Act 2002

2002 amendmentBritish Overseas Territories ActBritish Overseas Territories Act, 2002
In 2002, with the passing of the British Overseas Territories Act 2002, EU citizenship was extended to almost all British overseas territories citizens when they were automatically granted full British citizenship (with the exception of those with an association to the British sovereign base areas of Akrotiri and Dhekelia on the Island of Cyprus).
Although not explicitly stated, the act also granted them EU citizenship through UK's membership in the European Union, which (until UK's withdrawal from the EU is finalized) means that BOTCs with British citizen passports are afforded all rights accorded to EU citizens in any EU country.

Faroe Islands

FaroeseFaroesFaeroe Islands
Another example are the residents of Faroe Islands of Denmark who, though in possession of full Danish citizenship, are outside the EU and are explicitly excluded from EU citizenship under the terms of the Danish Accession Treaty.
Hence, Danish people living in the Faroes are not citizens of the European Union (though other EU nationals living there remain EU citizens).

Faroe Islands and the European Union

Faroe IslandsminimalFaroe Islands-EU relations
This is in contrast to residents of the Danish territory of Greenland who, whilst also outside the EU as a result of the 1984 Greenland Treaty, do receive EU citizenship as this was not specifically excluded by the terms of that treaty (see Faroe Islands and the European Union; Greenland and the European Union).
Hence, Danish people living in the Faroes are not citizens of the European Union (other EU nationals living there remain EU citizens), and do not have the right to settle in the EU without special permits.

Croatian nationality law

Croatian citizenshipCroatian citizenCroatian citizens
Because Croatia forms part of the European Union, Croatian citizens are also citizens of the European Union under European Union law and thus enjoy rights of free movement and have the right to vote in elections for the European Parliament.

European Single Market

internal marketsingle marketfree movement of goods
The free movement of persons means EU citizens can move freely between member states for whatever reason (or without any reason) and may reside in any member state they choose, if they are not an undue burden on the social welfare system or public safety in their chosen member state.

German nationality law

German citizenshipGermanGerman citizen
All German nationals are automatically also citizens of the European Union.

Cypriot nationality law

Cypriot citizenshipCypriot nationalitycitizenship
Because Cyprus forms part of the European Union, Cypriot citizens are also citizens of the European Union under European Union law and thus enjoy rights of free movement and have the right to vote in elections for the European Parliament.

Hungarian nationality law

Hungarian citizenshipHungarian citizenHungarian citizens
A Hungarian citizen is also a citizen of the European Union.

Bulgarian nationality law

BulgarianBulgarian citizenshipBulgaria
Since Bulgaria is member of the European Union, Bulgarian citizens are also citizens of the European Union under European Union law and thus have the right of freedom of movement within the EU and have the right to vote in elections for the European Parliament.

Luxembourg nationality law

LuxembourgLuxembourg citizensLuxembourgian nationality law
The Grand Duchy of Luxembourg is a member state of the European Union and, therefore, its citizens are also EU citizens.