Clark Air Base

Clark FieldClarkClark ABClark AFBClark Air Force BaseClark Expo AmphitheaterMabalacat AirfieldAir Field in ClarkAir Force City, Clark Airbase, PampangaAmerican military facility at nearby Clark Field
Clark Air Base is a Philippine Air Force base on Luzon Island in the Philippines, located 3 mi west of Angeles, about 40 mi northwest of Metro Manila.wikipedia
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Angeles, Philippines

AngelesAngeles CityAngeles City, Pampanga
Clark Air Base is a Philippine Air Force base on Luzon Island in the Philippines, located 3 mi west of Angeles, about 40 mi northwest of Metro Manila. Clark Air Base was originally established as Fort Stotsenburg in Sapang Bato, Angeles in 1903 under control of the U.S. Army.
Being home of the former Clark Air Base (once the largest United States military facility outside the continental United States), it was significantly affected by the fallout from the eruption of Mount Pinatubo in 1991.

Philippine Air Force

Air ForcePAFPhilippine Air Force (PAF)
Clark Air Base is a Philippine Air Force base on Luzon Island in the Philippines, located 3 mi west of Angeles, about 40 mi northwest of Metro Manila. Following the departure of American forces in 1991 due to the eruption of Mount Pinatubo, the base eventually became the site of Clark International Airport, the Clark Freeport Zone and the Air Force City of the Philippine Air Force.
As a result, a large US special operations force was formed and named Operation Classic Resolve, as USAF F4 fighter aircraft stationed at Clark Air Base patrolled above rebel air bases, and two aircraft carriers were positioned off the Philippines.

Philippines

🇵🇭FilipinoPhilippine
Clark Air Base is a Philippine Air Force base on Luzon Island in the Philippines, located 3 mi west of Angeles, about 40 mi northwest of Metro Manila.
During Corazon Aquino's administration, U.S. forces withdrew from the Philippines, due to the rejection of the U.S. Bases Extension Treaty, and leading to the official transfer of Clark Air Base in November 1991 and Subic Bay to the government in December 1992.

Clark International Airport

ClarkClark AirportClark Air Base
Following the departure of American forces in 1991 due to the eruption of Mount Pinatubo, the base eventually became the site of Clark International Airport, the Clark Freeport Zone and the Air Force City of the Philippine Air Force.
The name is derived from the former American Clark Air Force Base which was the largest overseas base of the United States Air Force until it was closed in 1991 and handed over to the Government of the Philippines.

18th Wing

18th Tactical Fighter Wing18th Fighter-Bomber Wing18th Fighter Wing
The Air Contingent was composed of five A-10C Thunderbolt IIs from the 51st Fighter Wing, Osan AB, South Korea; three HH-60G Pave Hawks from the 18th Wing, Kadena AB, Japan; and approximately 200 personnel deployed from multiple Pacific Air Force units.
The 18th Fighter Wing was established on 10 August 1948, and activated four days later at Clark Air Force Base.

Clark Freeport and Special Economic Zone

ClarkClark, PampangaClark Development Corporation
Following the departure of American forces in 1991 due to the eruption of Mount Pinatubo, the base eventually became the site of Clark International Airport, the Clark Freeport Zone and the Air Force City of the Philippine Air Force.
The CFZ covers the area of the former United States Air Force facility, Clark Air Base.

Attack on Clark Field

attacked Clark Fieldair raid nine hours after the Pearl Harbor attackbombed by Japanese aircraft
However, most of them were destroyed on the ground during an air raid nine hours after the Pearl Harbor attack.
As dawn moved westward across the Pacific (and the International Date Line), daylight airstrikes followed at mid-day (UTC+12) on Wake Island, at 09:27 (UTC+10) on Guam, at 06:00 (UTC+8) on Davao, at 09:30 (UTC+8) on Baguio and at 12:35 (UTC+8) on Clark Field.

Vietnam War

Vietnamwar in Vietnamwar
The base was a stronghold of the combined Filipino and American forces during the final months of World War II and a backbone of logistical support during the Vietnam War until 1975.
The Navy base at Subic Bay and the Clark Air Base achieved maximum functionality during the war and supported an estimated 80,000 locals in allied tertiary businesses from shoe making to prostitution.

Mount Pinatubo

Mt. Pinatubo1991 eruption of Mount PinatuboPinatubo
After extensive damage from the Mount Pinatubo volcanic eruption of 1991, the Philippine government attempted to reopen base lease talks, but terms could not be reached and the lease was not extended.
The U.S. Naval Base Subic Bay was 37 km south of Pinatubo, and the extent of Clark Air Base was just 14 km east of the volcano's summit.

405th Air Expeditionary Wing

405th Fighter Wing405th Tactical Training Wing405th Fighter-Bomber Wing
During much of the Cold War, Clark Air Base's activity largely revolved around the 405th Fighter Wing, later renumbered as the 3rd Tactical Fighter Wing in September 1974 and its fleet of F-4 Phantom II fighter jets.
The wing was reassigned to Pacific Air Forces in April 1959, replacing the PACAF 6200th Air Base Wing at Clark AB, Philippines.

3d Wing

3d Tactical Fighter Wing3d Bombardment Wing3rd Tactical Fighter Wing
During much of the Cold War, Clark Air Base's activity largely revolved around the 405th Fighter Wing, later renumbered as the 3rd Tactical Fighter Wing in September 1974 and its fleet of F-4 Phantom II fighter jets.
The aircraft to be moved to Clark AB, Philippines under Thirteenth Air Force.

Philippines Campaign (1944–1945)

Philippines CampaignPhilippinesliberation of the Philippines
Clark Air Base was recaptured by Americans in January 1945, after three months of fierce fighting to liberate the Philippines.
With heavy air support, Army units pushed inland, taking Clark Field, 40 mi northwest of Manila, in the last week of January.

Harold M. Clark

Harold Melville Clark
A portion of Fort Stotsenburg was officially set aside for the Aviation Section of the Signal Corps and named Clark Field in September 1919 after Harold M. Clark.
Clark Air Base, Clark International Airport, and New Clark City in the Philippines are named after Clark.

Sapangbato

Sapang Bato, Angeles
Clark Air Base was originally established as Fort Stotsenburg in Sapang Bato, Angeles in 1903 under control of the U.S. Army.
It is home to Fort Stotsenburg, also known as the "Parade Ground" of Clark Air Base.

Kadena Air Base

Kadena ABKadena AirfieldKadena
Clark was served regularly by cargo and passenger flights to and from Andersen AFB, Guam; Kadena AB, Japan; Diego Garcia; Jakarta, Indonesia; Bangkok and Ubon Thailand; and Saigon, Vietnam (until 1975).
581st Air Resupply Group (September 1953 – September 1956) (B-29) reassigned from the inactivating 581st Air Resupply and Communications Wing at Clark AB, Philippines. Performed unconventional warfare and counterinsurgency psychological operations. Inactivated and mission transferred to U.S. Navy.

Fort Stotsenburg

Camp Stotsenburg
Clark Air Base was originally established as Fort Stotsenburg in Sapang Bato, Angeles in 1903 under control of the U.S. Army.
Clark Air Base

Fifth Air Force

5th Air ForceFifthFar East Air Forces
Philippines Dept Air Force, 20 September 1941
The next year it moved to the new Clark Field on 15 October 1920 where, combined with some support units, the 1st Observation Group was formed.

United States Army Air Corps

Army Air CorpsAir CorpsU.S. Army Air Corps
Clark later served as a landing field for U.S. Army Air Corps medium bombers and accommodated half of the heavy bombers stationed in the Philippines during the 1930s.
4th Composite Group, Clark Field, Luzon

Far East Air Force (United States)

Far East Air ForceFar East Air ForcesFEAF
Far East Air Force, June 1945
An additional squadron, the 28th, was activated on 1 September 1922 at Nichols Field, and the group, now at Clark Field, was redesignated the 4th Composite Group on 2 December 1922.

Andersen Air Force Base

North FieldAndersen AFBAndersen Field
Clark was served regularly by cargo and passenger flights to and from Andersen AFB, Guam; Kadena AB, Japan; Diego Garcia; Jakarta, Indonesia; Bangkok and Ubon Thailand; and Saigon, Vietnam (until 1975).
In December, Andersen became home to the Thirteenth Air Force, which had evacuated from Clark Air Base in the Philippines after the eruption.

Trans International Airlines

Trans InternationalTransamerica Airlines
During the 1970s, passengers arrived via Trans International Douglas DC-8 and Braniff International DC-8s (the Pickle and the Banana) flights from Travis AFB, California (via Honolulu and Guam).
Most notable of these was the route that connected Clark Air Base, Philippines and Andersen Air Force Base, Guam, to Travis Air Force Base, California during the late 1970s, using DC-8s.

Flying Tiger Line

Flying TigersFlying TigerFlying Tiger Airline
By 1980, the base had grown to such an extent that weekly Flying Tigers Boeing 747 service to St. Louis (via Kadena AB Japan; Anchorage; and Los Angeles) had begun.
It also operated military contract services, most notably DC-8 routes between Travis Air Force Base, California and Japan in the 1970s, followed by weekly 747 passenger service between Clark Air Base, Philippines, and St. Louis, Missouri via Japan, Alaska, and Los Angeles during the 1980s.

Camp O'Donnell

Camp O’DonnellCapas Concentration CampCapas POW camp
During the war, the Allied prisoners on the Bataan Death March passed by the main gate of Clark Air Base as they followed the railway tracks north towards Camp O'Donnell.
Clark Air Base

Colonel Ernesto Rabina Air Base

Ernesto Rabina Air Base
Fighter planes regularly visited to participate in aerial warfare exercises at Crow Valley about 30 mi to the northwest.
The 42-mile facility is located approximately 14 miles from Clark Air Base and is primarily used for aerial combat training, which include bombing and strafing practice, as well as ground unit maneuver and live fire exercises.

Clark Veterans Cemetery

Clark Veterans Cemetery
These three cemeteries were the US Navy Sangley Point Military Cemetery and two smaller and older military cemeteries that had previously existed at Fort Stotsenburg called Stotsenburg I and II. Later, in 1949, Fort Stotsenburg itself was transferred from the U.S. Army to the United States Air Force and renamed Clark Air Force Base.