Clark Kent

ClarkClarc Kent-son/the Super-Manalter egoClark Joseph KentKent, Clarkalter-egoBespectacled, mild-manneredC. KentClark Kent / SupermanClark Kent disguise
Clark Joseph Kent is a fictional character appearing in American comic books published by DC Comics.wikipedia
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Superman

Kal-ElClark KentClark Kent / Superman
Created by Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster, he debuted in Action Comics #1 (June 1938) and serves as the civilian and secret identity of the superhero Superman.
They named him Clark Kent. Clark displayed various superhuman abilities such as incredible strength and impervious skin.

Adventures of Superman (TV series)

Adventures of SupermanThe Adventures of SupermanSuperman
This was the view in most comics and other media such as movie serials and TV (e.g., in Atom Man vs. Superman starring Kirk Alyn and The Adventures of Superman starring George Reeves) and radio.
George Reeves played Clark Kent/Superman, with Jack Larson as Jimmy Olsen, John Hamilton as Perry White, and Robert Shayne as Inspector Henderson.

Daily Planet

The Daily PlanetDaily StarFoswell, Sam
Although his name and history were taken from his early life with his adoptive Earth parents, everything about Clark was staged for the benefit of his alternate identity: as a reporter for the Daily Planet, he receives late-breaking news before the general public, has a plausible reason to be present at crime scenes, and need not strictly account for his whereabouts as long as he makes his story deadlines.
The newspaper is based in the fictional city of Metropolis, and employs Clark Kent, Lois Lane, and Jimmy Olsen, with Perry White as its editor-in-chief.

Jonathan and Martha Kent

Jonathan KentMartha KentJonathan
Adopted by Jonathan and Martha Kent from the Kansas town of Smallville, Clark (and thus Superman) was raised with the values of a typical rural American town, including attending the local Methodist Church (though it is debated by comic fans if Superman is a Methodist).
In most versions of Superman's origin story, Jonathan and Martha were the first to come across the rocket that brought the infant Kal-El, with their adopting him shortly thereafter, renaming him Clark Kent, "Clark" being Martha's maiden name.

Secret identity

secret identitiesdual identityidentities
Created by Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster, he debuted in Action Comics #1 (June 1938) and serves as the civilian and secret identity of the superhero Superman. As Superman's alter ego, the personality, concept, and name of Clark Kent have become ingrained in popular culture as well, becoming synonymous with secret identities and innocuous fronts for ulterior motives and activities.
Sometimes the distinction as to which persona is the "real one" may be blurred or confused, as has sometimes been the case with Clark Kent and Superman.

Atom Man vs. Superman

This was the view in most comics and other media such as movie serials and TV (e.g., in Atom Man vs. Superman starring Kirk Alyn and The Adventures of Superman starring George Reeves) and radio.
When Lex Luthor blackmail the city of Metropolis by threatening to destroy the entire community, Perry White, editor of the Daily Planet assigns Lois Lane, Jimmy Olsen and Clark Kent to cover the story.

The Man of Steel (comics)

The Man of SteelMan of SteelSuperman
In John Byrne's 1986 origin version The Man of Steel, instead of adopting him through an orphanage, the Kents passed Clark off as their own child after their farm was isolated for months by a series of snowstorms that took place shortly after they found his rocket, using their past medical history of various miscarriages to account for their reasons for keeping Martha's pregnancy secret.
The series includes the embryonic Kal-El rocketing away from the destruction of Krypton and his birth upon landing in Kansas when he emerged from the artificial womb, Clark Kent as a teenager in Smallville learning that he was found in a crashed space ship, his being hired at the Daily Planet in Metropolis, the creation of his secret identity of Superman, his first meeting with fellow hero Batman, and how he finally learned of his birth parents and from where he came.

Superboy (Kal-El)

SuperboyKal-Elteenage Clark Kent
In the Silver Age comics continuity, Clark's superpowers manifested upon his landing on Earth and he gradually learned to master them, adopting the superhero identity of Superboy at the age of eight.
In this original story, years after his arrival on Earth, Clark Kent saves a man pinned under an automobile and subsequently decides to become the costumed hero Superboy.

Smallville (comics)

SmallvilleSmallville, Kansas Smallville
Adopted by Jonathan and Martha Kent from the Kansas town of Smallville, Clark (and thus Superman) was raised with the values of a typical rural American town, including attending the local Methodist Church (though it is debated by comic fans if Superman is a Methodist).
Noted residents of Smallville include the Kent family, Jonathan and Martha Kent, or Ma and Pa Kent as they were often called, and their adopted son Clark Kent; Clark's friend, classmate and sometimes romantic interest Lana Lang; Clark's best friend Pete Ross, and Smallville police chief Douglas Parker.

Joe Shuster

ShusterJoseph "Joe" ShusterShuster University
Created by Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster, he debuted in Action Comics #1 (June 1938) and serves as the civilian and secret identity of the superhero Superman.
Shuster modeled the hero on Douglas Fairbanks Sr., and his bespectacled alter ego, Clark Kent, on a combination of Harold Lloyd and Shuster himself, with the name "Clark Kent" derived from movie stars Clark Gable and Kent Taylor.

Action Comics 1

Action Comics'' #1Action Comics #1#1
Created by Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster, he debuted in Action Comics #1 (June 1938) and serves as the civilian and secret identity of the superhero Superman.
4) When Superman (now named Clark Kent) reaches maturity, he discovers that he can leap 1/8 of a mile, hurdle 20-story buildings, "raise tremendous weights", outrun a train, and "that nothing less than a bursting shell could penetrate his skin".

One Year Later

One yearBrave New WorldA year later
Following One Year Later, Clark adopts some tricks to account for his absences, such as feigning illness or offering to call the police.
The story primarily featured a depowered Clark Kent (having lost his powers in the climax of Infinite Crisis) using his skills as a journalist to defend Metropolis from both organized crime and Lex Luthor, newly bankrupt and disgraced due to his actions in the series 52.

Lana Lang

L''ana ''L''angLanaLana Lazarenko
Only a few trusted people are aware of it, such as Batman and other members of the Justice League, Superman's cousin Supergirl, and Clark's childhood friend Lana Lang.
Across decades of Superman comics and adaptations into other media, Lana has most consistently been depicted as Superman's teenage romantic interest growing up in Smallville; as an adult, she is a distant friend of Superman in his civilian identity as Clark Kent.

Jimmy Olsen

James OlsenJames "Jimmy" OlsenSuperman's Pal, Jimmy Olsen
Shortly before this trouble began, Superman also revealed his identity to Jimmy Olsen.
He is close friends with Lois Lane and Clark Kent/Superman, and has a good working relationship with his boss Perry White.

Kent Taylor

In 1992, Superman co-creator Joe Shuster told the Toronto Star that the name derived from 1930s cinematic leading men Clark Gable and Kent Taylor, but the persona from bespectacled silent film comic Harold Lloyd and himself.
Along with Clark Gable, Kent Taylor served as the inspiration behind the name of Superman's alter-ego Clark Kent.

Perry White

Alice WhiteKeith Whiteboss
In the 2009 retcon of the mythos, Lois Lane is fully aware from the beginning, along with Perry White, that the meek, pudgy, and bumbling Clark Kent deliberately holds himself back: however, still far from associating him with Superman, they simply believe he's hiding his qualities as a good reporter.
The earliest Superman comics shows Clark Kent and Lois Lane working for the newspaper the Daily Star and an editor named George Taylor.

Alter ego

alter-egodouble lifealter egos
As Superman's alter ego, the personality, concept, and name of Clark Kent have become ingrained in popular culture as well, becoming synonymous with secret identities and innocuous fronts for ulterior motives and activities.
In comic books, superheroes and their secret identities are often considered alter egos. The archetypal comic book hero, Superman, assumes the identity of the "mild-mannered" newspaper reporter Clark Kent in order to live among the citizens of Metropolis without arousing suspicion. The Incredible Hulk comic book series further complicates this theme, as Bruce Banner loses control to the Hyde-like Hulk whenever he becomes angry, yet also depends upon the Hulk's super powers in order to combat villains. Comic book-inspired alter egos can be seen in other forms of popular fiction, including television and movie adaptations of comic books, parodies of this genre, and unrelated fictions.

Lex Luthor

LuthorLexPresident Luthor
In "The Secret Revealed", a supercomputer constructed by Lex Luthor calculated Superman's true identity from information that had been assembled by his staff, but Lex dismissed the idea because he could not believe that someone so powerful would want another, weaker identity.
Lois Lane and Clark Kent investigate, which results in Lois being kidnapped.

Superman vs. Muhammad Ali

Ali, Muhammaddeduce the identity and retain the knowledgeMuhammad Ali
(In pre-Crisis stories, Lana did not know, but their friend Pete Ross did, unbeknownst to anyone, including Clark.) Lex Luthor, other supervillains, and various civilians have learned the secret identity several times, though their knowledge is usually removed through various means (the boxer Muhammad Ali is one of the very few to deduce the identity and retain the knowledge).
Following a tip-off, Jimmy Olsen leads his friends Clark Kent (secretly Superman) and Lois Lane into a ghetto district of Metropolis for an exclusive interview with Muhammad Ali.

Dean Cain

Dean Cain in the 1990s series Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman showed Clark as a normal and shy Everyman demonstrating occasional touches of clumsiness (e.g., pretending to burn his mouth on coffee), but still a highly skilled journalist, much like the current post-Crisis portrayal. His Superman, by contrast, was very much the model of the classic hero who stood up straight and spoke in a more formal and authoritative voice. In the episode "Tempus Fugitive", the time-traveler Tempus mocks Lois, saying that future historians laugh at her for being fooled by a pair of glasses. On the other hand, H.G. Wells tells Lois that in truth the people of the future simply considered Lois to be blinded by love, and that this has made her story a compelling one throughout the intervening years.
Dean George Cain (né Tanaka; born July 31, 1966) is an American actor, producer and television show host, best known for playing the role of Clark Kent/Superman in the TV series Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman.

Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman

Lois & ClarkThe New Adventures of SupermanLois and Clark
Dean Cain in the 1990s series Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman showed Clark as a normal and shy Everyman demonstrating occasional touches of clumsiness (e.g., pretending to burn his mouth on coffee), but still a highly skilled journalist, much like the current post-Crisis portrayal. His Superman, by contrast, was very much the model of the classic hero who stood up straight and spoke in a more formal and authoritative voice. In the episode "Tempus Fugitive", the time-traveler Tempus mocks Lois, saying that future historians laugh at her for being fooled by a pair of glasses. On the other hand, H.G. Wells tells Lois that in truth the people of the future simply considered Lois to be blinded by love, and that this has made her story a compelling one throughout the intervening years.
It stars Dean Cain as Clark Kent/Superman and Teri Hatcher as Lois Lane.

Christopher Reeve

ChristopherChristopher and Dana Reeve Paralysis Resource CenterChristopher Reeve's injury
Christopher Reeve in the Superman film series, who was praised for making the disguise's effectiveness credible to audiences, portrayed Clark Kent as clumsy and mild mannered. In his book Still Me, Reeve says he based his interpretation of Clark Kent on Cary Grant's nerdy character in Bringing Up Baby. Tom Mankiewicz described his performance on the commentary track for Superman II: The Richard Donner Cut as always playing Superman but, when he was Clark, playing Superman playing Clark Kent.
During My Life, Stark Hesseltine told Reeve that he had been asked to audition for the leading role as Clark Kent/Superman in the big budget film, Superman (1978).

Superman robots

Superman robotrobotsAjax
Superman robots, androids that physically resemble Superman in powers and appearance. Superman robots were primarily used during the Silver Age, but were largely disposed of after the early '70s. Clark Kent robots were also maintained by Superman for similar purposes.
These robots each possessed a fraction of the Man of Steel's powers, and were sometimes used to substitute for him on missions (such as those where kryptonite was present) or for the purposes of protecting his secret identity (to that end, Superman also possessed a few Clark Kent robots).

The Superman Family

Superman Family AdventuresSuperman FamilyEd Lacy
The feature was later shown in the Superman Family title.
The Private Life of Clark Kent—The adventures of Clark Kent in which he used his powers and skills without becoming Superman. This feature had moved over from Superman after issue #328 of that series. (#182, #191–196) After the cancellation of The Superman Family, it returned to Superman for two more appearances in issues #371 and 373.

The New Adventures of Superman (TV series)

The New Adventures of SupermanNew Adventures of Superman, TheSuperman
The CBS Saturday morning series The New Adventures of Superman produced by Filmation Studios—as well as The Adventures of Superboy from the same animation house—featured the iconic "shirt rip" to reveal the "S" or Clark Kent removing his unbuttoned white dress shirt in a secluded spot, usually thanks to stock animation which was reused over dozens of episodes, to reveal his costume underneath while uttering his famed line "This is a job for Superman!"
These adventures were the first time that Superman (and his guise of Clark Kent), Lois Lane and Perry White had been seen in animated form since the Fleischer brothers had immortalized them in the Superman short films of the 1940s.