Classical Chinese poetry

poetpoetryChinese poetClassical Chinese poemclassical poetry and versesChinese poetryClassical Chinese poetclassical Chinese verse.their poetrytraditional Chinese poetry
Classical Chinese poetry is traditional Chinese poetry written in Classical Chinese and typified by certain traditional forms, or modes; traditional genres; and connections with particular historical periods, such as the poetry of the Tang Dynasty.wikipedia
255 Related Articles

Chinese poetry

poetChinesepoetry
Classical Chinese poetry is traditional Chinese poetry written in Classical Chinese and typified by certain traditional forms, or modes; traditional genres; and connections with particular historical periods, such as the poetry of the Tang Dynasty.
While this last term comprises Classical Chinese, Standard Chinese, Mandarin Chinese, Yue Chinese, and other historical and vernacular forms of the language, its poetry generally falls into one of two primary types, Classical Chinese poetry and Modern Chinese poetry.

Chu Ci

ChuciSongs of ChuVerses of Chu
The main source sources for the earliest preserved poems are the Classic of Poetry (Shijing) and the Songs of the South (Chuci).
The early (pre-Qin dynasty) Classical Chinese poetry is mainly known through the two anthologies, the Chu Ci and the Shi Jing (Classic of Poetry or Book of Songs).

Qu Yuan

Mi YuanCh'ü YüanTuen Ng Festival
One important part of this is the Li Sao, attributed to Qu Yuan.
He is known for his patriotism and contributions to classical poetry and verses, especially through the poems of the Chu Ci anthology (also known as The Songs of the South or Songs of Chu): a volume of poems attributed to or considered to be inspired by his verse writing.

Gushi (poetry)

gushigushi'', or "old-style versegutishi
The new form of shi developed during the Han and the Jian'an period would become known as "gushi", or "ancient style poetry".
Gushi is one of the main poetry forms defined in Classical Chinese poetry, literally meaning "old (or ancient) poetry" or "old (or ancient) style poetry": gushi is a technical term for certain historically exemplary poems, together with later poetry composed in this formal style.

Han poetry

poetry of the Han DynastyHan Dynasty balladsHan dynasty folk ballads
The Han dynasty witnessed major developments in Classical Chinese poetry, including both the active role of the imperial government in encouraging poetry through the Music Bureau and through its collection of Han dynasty folk ballads (although some of these seem to have been subject to at least some post-folk literary polishing, as in the case of the Shijing).
This poetry reflects one of the poetry world's more important flowerings, as well as being a special period in Classical Chinese poetry, particularly in regard to the development of the quasipoetic fu; the activities of the Music Bureau in connection with the collection of popular ballads and the resultant development of what would eventually become known as the yuefu, or as the rhapsodic formal style; and, finally, towards the end of the Han Dynasty, the development of a new style of shi poetry, as the later development of the yuehfu into regular, fixed-line length forms makes it difficult to distinguish in form from the shi form of poetic verse, and at what point specific poems are classified as one or the other is somewhat arbitrary.

Li Sao

LisaoSaoChu ''sao
One important part of this is the Li Sao, attributed to Qu Yuan.
In his signature poem "Li Sao", Qu Yuan manifests himself in a poetic character, which is a major landmark in the tradition of Classical Chinese poetry, contrasting with the anonymous poetic voices encountered in the Shijing and the other early poems which exist as preserved in the form of incidental incorporations into various documents of ancient miscellany.

Sima Xiangru

One exponent of this style was Sima Xiangru.
Sima is a significant figure in the history of Classical Chinese poetry, and is generally regarded as the greatest of all composers of Chinese fu rhapsodies.

Music Bureau

Imperial Music BureauMusic Bureau styleShi Kuang
The Han dynasty witnessed major developments in Classical Chinese poetry, including both the active role of the imperial government in encouraging poetry through the Music Bureau and through its collection of Han dynasty folk ballads (although some of these seem to have been subject to at least some post-folk literary polishing, as in the case of the Shijing).
The songs/poems collected or developed by the Han music bureau received the appellation of "yuefu"; but, eventually, the term "Music Bureau", or yuefu (also yueh-fu) also came to be applied to a category of Classical Chinese poetry which was based upon the standard forms and themes documented or promoted by the Music Bureau staff during the Han Dynasty.

Midnight Songs poetry

Lady MidnightMidnight Songs
The Jin Dynasty era was typified poetically by, for example, the Orchid Pavilion Gathering of 42 literati; the romantic Midnight Songs poetry; and, Tao Yuanming, the great and highly personal poet who was noted for speaking in his own voice rather than a persona.
This is of major significance within the Classical Chinese poetry tradition, finding such practitioners of the genre as Li Bai (also known as Li Bo or Li Po); as well as importantly influencing world poetry through translations, such as by David Hinton.

Lüshi (poetry)

lüshifive-character-regular-verseLu
The Tang dynasty (618–907) was particularly noted for its poetry, especially the shi forms such as jueju and lüshi.
Lüshi refers to a specific form of Classical Chinese poetry verse form.

Ci (poetry)

cici poetryci'' (song lyric) poetry
The Song dynasty (960–1279) was noted for its poetry, perhaps especially the development of the Ci form; indeed, the ci as a poetic form perhaps reached a high point during the Song Dynasty.
Cí ( pronounced ; ) is a type of lyric poetry in the tradition of Classical Chinese poetry.

Yongming poetry

YongmingYongming poetYongming reign
Some of the highlights of the poetry of the Northern and Southern Dynasties include the Yongming poets, the anthology collection New Songs from the Jade Terrace, and Su Hui's Star Gauge.
However brief this era, it is now associated with a major movement within Classical Chinese poetry.

Shi (poetry)

shigushishi'' poetry
The Tang dynasty (618–907) was particularly noted for its poetry, especially the shi forms such as jueju and lüshi. The Han dynasty poetry is particularly associated with the fu, as opposed to the shi style of poetry or literature: note, however, that this fu is a different word than the fu meaning government bureau in the term yuefu (sometimes spelled Yüeh Fu, or similarly).
This use is not common within Chinese literature, however, which instead classifies these poems into other categories such as "classical Chinese poetry", "Field and Garden" poetry, and "curtailed" poetry.

Classical Chinese poetry genres

biansai shiClassical Chinese poetry genregenre
Classical Chinese poetry is traditional Chinese poetry written in Classical Chinese and typified by certain traditional forms, or modes; traditional genres; and connections with particular historical periods, such as the poetry of the Tang Dynasty.

Middle Chinese

Early Middle ChineseLate Middle ChineseMC
In part because of the prevalence of rhymed and parallel structures within Tang poetry, it also has a role in linguistics studies, such as in the reconstruction of Middle Chinese pronunciation.
The study of Middle Chinese also provides for a better understanding and analysis of Classical Chinese poetry, such as the study of Tang poetry.

Classical Chinese poetry forms

Classical Chinese poetry formChinaclassical Chinese poems
Classical Chinese poetry is traditional Chinese poetry written in Classical Chinese and typified by certain traditional forms, or modes; traditional genres; and connections with particular historical periods, such as the poetry of the Tang Dynasty.

Classical Chinese

Literary ChineseChineseclassical
Classical Chinese poetry is traditional Chinese poetry written in Classical Chinese and typified by certain traditional forms, or modes; traditional genres; and connections with particular historical periods, such as the poetry of the Tang Dynasty.

Tang poetry

poetTang dynasty poetrypoetry
Classical Chinese poetry is traditional Chinese poetry written in Classical Chinese and typified by certain traditional forms, or modes; traditional genres; and connections with particular historical periods, such as the poetry of the Tang Dynasty. The Tang dynasty (618–907) was particularly noted for its poetry, especially the shi forms such as jueju and lüshi.

Qu (poetry)

ququ form of Chinese verseYuan Dynasty operas
Yuan drama's notable qu form was set to music, restricting each individual poem to one of nine modal key selections and one of over two hundred tune patterns.
The fixed-tone type of verse such as the Qu and the ci together with the shi and fu forms of poetry comprise the three main forms of Classical Chinese poetry.

Jian'an poetry

Jian'anJian'an'' styleJian'an poet
Jian'an poetry refers to those poetic movements occurring during the final years of the failing Han Dynasty and continuing their development into the beginning of the Six Dynasties period.

Modern Chinese poetry

However, the development and great expansion of modern Chinese poetry is generally thought to start at this point in history, or shortly afterwards.
Modern Chinese poetry, including New poetry, refers to post Qing Dynasty (1644 to 1912) Chinese poetry, including the modern vernacular (baihua) style of poetry increasingly common with the New Culture and 4 May 1919 movements, with the development of experimental styles such as "free verse" (as opposed to the traditional Chinese poetry written in Classical Chinese language); but, also including twentieth and twenty-first century continuations or revivals of Classical Chinese poetry forms.

Nineteen Old Poems

19 Old PoemsNineteen Old SongsNineteen Poems
Another important Han dynasty poetry collection is the Nineteen Old Poems.

New Songs from the Jade Terrace

New Songs from a Jade TerraceNew Songs from the Jade Terrace ''(''Yutai xinyong'' 玉臺新詠)
Some of the highlights of the poetry of the Northern and Southern Dynasties include the Yongming poets, the anthology collection New Songs from the Jade Terrace, and Su Hui's Star Gauge. The Six Dynasties (220–589) also witnessed major developments in Classical Chinese poetry, especially emphasizing romantic love, gender roles, and human relationships, and including the important collection New Songs from the Jade Terrace.

Wang Wei (Tang dynasty)

Wang WeiWang Wei (王維)Wáng Wéi
Some authors, such as Li Bai (also known as Li Po), Wang Wei, Du Fu, and Bai Juyi (also known as Po Chü-i) managed to maintain consistent popularity.

Tao Yuanming

Tao QianT'ao Ch'ien
The Jin Dynasty era was typified poetically by, for example, the Orchid Pavilion Gathering of 42 literati; the romantic Midnight Songs poetry; and, Tao Yuanming, the great and highly personal poet who was noted for speaking in his own voice rather than a persona.