Classification schemes for indigenous languages of the Americas

C1929 classificationclassification of Indigenous languages of the AmericasClassification schemes for Native American languagesfamilies of the AmericasHokan–SiouanTakelmanTunicanTunican language
This article is a list of different language classification proposals developed for indigenous languages of the Americas.wikipedia
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Edward Sapir

SapirSapir, EdwardSapir tradition
Below is Edward Sapir's (1929) famous Encyclopædia Britannica classification.
Among his major contributions to linguistics is his classification of Indigenous languages of the Americas, upon which he elaborated for most of his professional life.

Chimariko language

Chimarikocid
Edward Sapir's famous [[Classification schemes for indigenous languages of the Americas#Sapir (1929): Encyclopædia Britannica|1929 classification]] grouped Chimariko with Shastan, Palaihnihan, Pomoan, and the Karuk and Yana languages in a Hokan sub-grouping known as Northern Hokan.

Lumpers and splitters

splitlumpedsplitter
Sapir was part of a "lumper" movement in Native American language classification.
For this reason, many language families have had lumper–splitter controversies, including Altaic, Pama–Nyungan, Nilo-Saharan, and most of the larger families of the Americas.

Zuni language

ZuniZuñizun
Zuni was included as being part of the Aztec-Tanoan language family within Edward Sapir's heuristic [[Classification schemes for indigenous languages of the Americas#Sapir (1929): Encyclopædia Britannica|1929 classification]] (without supporting evidence).

Penutian languages

PenutianPenutian languagePenutian language family
(Sapir's full 1929 classification scheme including the Penutian proposal can be seen here: [[Classification schemes for indigenous languages of the Americas#Sapir (1929): Encyclopædia Britannica]].)

Indigenous languages of the Americas

Native American languagesindigenous languagesNative American language
This article is a list of different language classification proposals developed for indigenous languages of the Americas.
Other proposals are more controversial with many linguists believing that some genetic relationships of a proposal may be demonstrated but much of it undemonstrated (for example, Hokan–Siouan, which, incidentally, Edward Sapir called his "wastepaper basket stock").

Lyle Campbell

Campbell, LyleCampbell
In American Indian Languages: The Historical Linguistics of Native America, Lyle Campbell describes various pidgins and trade languages spoken by the indigenous peoples of the Americas.
* Classification schemes for indigenous languages of the Americas

Albert Gallatin

GallatinistAbraham Alfonse Albert GallatinGallatin
An early attempt at North American language classification was attempted by A. A. Albert Gallatin published in 1826, 1836, and 1848.

John Wesley Powell

PowellJohn PowellJohn W. Powell
Gallatin's classifications are missing several languages which are later recorded in the classifications by Daniel G. Brinton and John Wesley Powell. John Wesley Powell, an explorer who served as director of the Bureau of American Ethnology, published a classification of 58 "stocks" that is the "cornerstone" of genetic classifications in North America.

Bureau of American Ethnology

Bureau of EthnologySmithsonian Bureau of EthnologyUS Bureau of Ethnology
John Wesley Powell, an explorer who served as director of the Bureau of American Ethnology, published a classification of 58 "stocks" that is the "cornerstone" of genetic classifications in North America.

Language family

language familiesfamilyLanguage families and languages
John Wesley Powell, an explorer who served as director of the Bureau of American Ethnology, published a classification of 58 "stocks" that is the "cornerstone" of genetic classifications in North America.

Daniel Garrison Brinton

Daniel G. BrintonBrintonDaniel Brinton
Gallatin's classifications are missing several languages which are later recorded in the classifications by Daniel G. Brinton and John Wesley Powell.

Eskimo–Aleut languages

Eskimo–AleutEskimoEskimo-Aleut
Joseph Greenberg's classification in his 1987 book Language in the Americas is best known for the highly controversial assertion that all North, Central and South American language families other than Eskimo–Aleut and Na-Dene including Haida, are part of an Amerind macrofamily.