Claudia (gens)

Claudiigens ClaudiaClaudiaClaudiusClaudii MarcelliClaudianClaudian familyClaudia gensClaudian gensClaudii Nerones
The gens Claudia, sometimes written Clodia, was one of the most prominent patrician houses at Rome.wikipedia
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Appius Claudius Sabinus Regillensis

Appius ClaudiusAttius ClaususAp. Claudius Sabinus Regillensis
The first of the Claudii to obtain the consulship was Appius Claudius Sabinus Regillensis, in 495 BC, and from that time its members frequently held the highest offices of the state, both under the Republic and in imperial times. According to legend, the first of the Claudii was a Sabine, by the name of Attius Clausus, who came to Rome with his retainers in 504 BC, the sixth year of the Republic.
505 – 480 BC) was the legendary founder of the Roman gens Claudia, and consul in 495 BC.

Clodius

alternative spelling of his nameClodia
The gens Claudia, sometimes written Clodia, was one of the most prominent patrician houses at Rome.
Clodius is an alternate form of the Roman nomen Claudius, a patrician gens that was traditionally regarded as Sabine in origin.

Tiberius

Tiberius CaesarEmperor TiberiusTiberius Claudius Nero
In his life of the emperor Tiberius, who was a scion of the Claudii, the historian Suetonius gives a summary of the gens, and says, "as time went on it was honoured with twenty-eight consulships, five dictatorships, seven censorships, six triumphs, and two ovations."
Born to Tiberius Claudius Nero and Livia Drusilla in a Claudian family, he was given the personal name Tiberius Claudius Nero.

Julio-Claudian dynasty

Julio-ClaudianJulio-ClaudiansImperial Family
Writing several decades after the fall of the so-called "Julio-Claudian dynasty", Suetonius took care to mention both the good and wicked deeds attributed to members of the family.
The name "Julio-Claudian dynasty" is a historiographical term derived from the two main branches of the imperial family: the gens Julia (Julii Caesares) and gens Claudia (Claudii Nerones).

Claudius

Emperor ClaudiusClaudianClaudius Caesar
During the Republic, no patrician Claudius adopted a member of another gens; the emperor Claudius was the first who broke this custom, by adopting Lucius Domitius Ahenobarbus, afterwards the emperor Nero.
He was a descendant of the Octavii Rufi (through Gaius Octavius), Julii Caesares (through Julia Minor and Julia Antonia), and the Claudii Nerones (through Nero Claudius Drusus).

Roman Republic

RomanRepublicRomans
The gens traced its origin to the earliest days of the Roman Republic. According to legend, the first of the Claudii was a Sabine, by the name of Attius Clausus, who came to Rome with his retainers in 504 BC, the sixth year of the Republic.
The most prominent of these families were the Cornelii, followed by the Aemilii, Claudii, Fabii, and Valerii.

Plebs

plebeianplebeiansplebe
Plebeian Claudii are found fairly early in Rome's history.
Certain gentes ("clans") were patrician, as identified by the nomen (family name), but a gens might have both patrician and plebeian branches that shared a nomen but were distinguished by a cognomen, as was the case with the gens Claudia.

Appius Claudius Sabinus Regillensis (consul 471 BC)

Appius Claudius SabinusAppius ClaudiusAppius Claudius Sabinus Regillensis
f. M. n. Sabinus Regillensis (or Inregillensis'''), was a member of the great patrician house of the Claudii at Ancient Rome.

Gaius Claudius Sabinus Regillensis

brotherC. Claudius Inregillensis SabinusGaius Claudius Ap. f. M. n. Sabinus Regillensis
f. M. n. Sabinus Regillensis (or Inregillensis'''), was a member of the great patrician house of the Claudii at Ancient Rome.

Ancient Rome

RomanRomansRome
The gens Claudia, sometimes written Clodia, was one of the most prominent patrician houses at Rome.
The dynasty is so-called due to the gens Julia, family of Augustus, and the gens Claudia, family of Tiberius.

Patrician (ancient Rome)

patricianpatrikiospatricians
The gens Claudia, sometimes written Clodia, was one of the most prominent patrician houses at Rome.
However, large gentes with multiple stirpes seem to have coped better; the Aemilii, Claudii, Cornelii, Fabii, Sulpicii, and Valerii all continued to thrive under the Principate.

Appius (praenomen)

Appius
The early Claudii favored the praenomina Appius, Gaius, and Publius.
Appius is a Latin praenomen, or personal name, usually abbreviated Ap. or sometimes App., and best known as a result of its extensive use by the patrician gens Claudia.

Annia (gens)

gens AnniaAnniaAnnia gens
But in fact there are other figures in Roman history named "Appius", and in later times the name was used by plebeian families such as the Junii and the Annii.
Other names occur infrequently, although in imperial times several of the Annii used Appius, an otherwise uncommon praenomen chiefly associated with the Claudii.

Appius Claudius Caecus

Appius ClaudiusAp. Claudius CaecusApp. Claudius Caecus
The other main families of the patrician Claudii were descended from Appius Claudius Caecus, the last recorded member of the Claudii Crassi, who gave a different cognomen to each of his four sons: Russus (or Rufus), Pulcher, Cento or Centho, and Nero.
This image is notably found in the works of Livy, Suetonius and Tacitus, who repeated these accusations on the other Claudii.

Sabines

SabineSabiniKingdom of Sabinum
According to legend, the first of the Claudii was a Sabine, by the name of Attius Clausus, who came to Rome with his retainers in 504 BC, the sixth year of the Republic.
Some of the gentes of the Roman republic were proud of their Sabine heritage, such as the Claudia gens, assuming Sabinus as a cognomen or agnomen.

Publius Claudius Pulcher (consul 249 BC)

Publius Claudius PulcherP. Claudius PulcherPublius Claudius Ap. f. C. n. Pulcher
Publius Claudius Pulcher (died 249 BC/246 BC) (of the Claudii family) was a Roman politician.

Appius Claudius Caudex

Ap. Claudius CaudexAppius ClaudiusAppius Claudius C. f. Ap. n. Caudex
Appius Claudius Caudex (flourished 264 BC) was a patrician member of the Claudii.

Roman naming conventions

nomenfiliationgentilicum
The nomen Claudius, originally Clausus, is usually said to be derived from the Latin adjective claudus, meaning "lame".
Furthermore, a number of the oldest and most influential patrician families made a habit of choosing unusual names; in particular the Fabii, Aemilii, Furii, Claudii, Cornelii, and Valerii all used praenomina that were uncommon amongst the patricians, or which had fallen out of general use.

Publius Clodius Pulcher

ClodiusClodius PulcherPublius Claudius Pulcher
Clodius was a Roman nobilis of the patrician Claudian gens and a senator.

Appius Claudius Pulcher (consul 54 BC)

Appius Claudius PulcherAp. Claudius PulcherAppius Claudius
He was head of the senior line of the most powerful family of the patrician Claudii.

Gaius Claudius Crassus

Gaius Claudius Ap. f. Ap. n. CrassusGaius Claudius Crassinus RegillensisGaius Claudius Crassus Inregillensis
Caecus belonged to the patrician gens Claudia, one of the most important families of the Republic, which counted prominent men from its beginning to the Roman Empire.

Marcus Livius Drusus Claudianus

Appius Claudius PulcherMarcus Livius DrususMarcus Livius M. f. M. n. Drusus Claudianus
He was born with the name Appius Claudius Pulcher, into the patrician family of the Claudii.

Aulus Postumius Albus Regillensis (consul 496 BC)

Aulus Postumius Albus RegillensisAulus Postumius AlbusA. Postumius
The same cognomen was borne by a family of the Postumii, although in this instance the surname is supposed to have been derived from the Battle of Lake Regillus, in which the victorious Roman general was the dictator Aulus Postumius Albus.
The name "Regillensis" is usually supposed to have been derived from this battle; but Niebuhr thinks that it was taken from a place of residence, just as the Claudii bore the same name, and that the later annalists only spoke of Postumius as commander in consequence of the name.

Nero Claudius Drusus

DrususDrusus the ElderDrusus Germanicus
He was a patrician Claudian on his birth father's side but his maternal grandmother was from a plebeian family.

Germanicus

Germanicus CaesarGermanicus Julius CaesarCaesar
The son of Nero Claudius Drusus and Antonia Minor, Germanicus was born into an influential branch of the patrician gens Claudia.