Clerestory

clerestoriesclerestoriedclerestoreyclerestory windowsclearstoryclerestory roofclerestory windowclerestory roofsRobinson Clerestory BCLcelestory
In architecture, a clerestory (lit. clear storey, also clearstory, clearstorey, or overstorey) is a high section of wall that contains windows above eye level.wikipedia
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Basilica

basilicasminor basilicabasilican
Historically, clerestory denoted an upper level of a Roman basilica or of the nave of a Romanesque or Gothic church, the walls of which rise above the rooflines of the lower aisles and are pierced with windows.
The central aisle tended to be wide and was higher than the flanking aisles, so that light could penetrate through the clerestory windows.

Gothic architecture

GothicGothic styleLate Gothic
Historically, clerestory denoted an upper level of a Roman basilica or of the nave of a Romanesque or Gothic church, the walls of which rise above the rooflines of the lower aisles and are pierced with windows.
There are also many hall churches (Hallenkirchen) without clerestory windows.

Romanesque architecture

RomanesqueRomanesque styleLate Romanesque
Historically, clerestory denoted an upper level of a Roman basilica or of the nave of a Romanesque or Gothic church, the walls of which rise above the rooflines of the lower aisles and are pierced with windows.
While the arcade of a cloister is typically of a single stage, the arcade that divides the nave and aisles in a church is typically of two stages, with a third stage of window openings known as the clerestory rising above them.

Aisle

aislesside aisleaisled
Historically, clerestory denoted an upper level of a Roman basilica or of the nave of a Romanesque or Gothic church, the walls of which rise above the rooflines of the lower aisles and are pierced with windows.
In Gothic architecture, the aisles' roofs are lower than that of the nave, allowing light to enter through clerestory windows.

Arcade (architecture)

arcadearcadesarcaded
Initially the nave of a large aisled and clerestoried church was of two levels, arcade and clerestory.
In the Gothic architectural tradition, the arcade can be located in the interior, in the lowest part of the wall of the nave, supporting the triforium and the clerestory in a cathedral, or on the exterior, in which they are usually part of the walkways that surround the courtyard and cloisters.

Egyptian temple

templetemplesancient Egyptian temple
The technology of the clerestory appears to originate in the temples of ancient Egypt.
They were often less dark as well: New Kingdom halls rose into tall central passages over the processional path, allowing a clerestory to provide dim light.

Triforium

triforiaarched gallerybiforium
During the Romanesque period a third level was inserted between them, a gallery called the "triforium".
In a church, it opens onto the nave from above the side aisles; it may occur at the level of the clerestory windows, or it may be located as a separate level below the clerestory.

Window

fenestrationlightsclerestory window
In architecture, a clerestory (lit. clear storey, also clearstory, clearstorey, or overstorey) is a high section of wall that contains windows above eye level. The ribbed vaulting and flying buttresses of Gothic architecture concentrated the weight and thrust of the roof, freeing wall-space for larger clerestory fenestration.
Types include the eyebrow window, fixed windows, single-hung and double-hung sash windows, horizontal sliding sash windows, casement windows, awning windows, hopper windows, tilt and slide windows (often door-sized), tilt and turn windows, transom windows, sidelight windows, jalousie or louvered windows, clerestory windows, skylights, roof windows, roof lanterns, bay windows, oriel windows, thermal, or Diocletian, windows, picture windows, emergency exit windows, stained glass windows, French windows, panel windows, and double - and triple paned windows.

Lightwell

light welllight-wellAir well (ventilation)
In the Minoan palaces of Crete such as Knossos, by contrast, lightwells were employed in addition to clerestories.

Daylighting

natural lightnatural lightingskylight
Modern clerestory windows may have another especially important role, besides daylighting and ventilation: they can be part of passive solar strategies, in very energy efficient buildings (Passive House Buildings, Zero Energy Buildings).
Another important element in creating daylighting is the use of clerestory windows.

Augsburg Cathedral

cathedralCathedral of AugsburgCathedral of Our Lady Visitation and the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus
The oldest glass clerestory windows still in place are from the late eleventh century, found in the Augsburg Cathedral
The southern clerestory has five stained glass windows dated to the late 11th-early 12th centuries, the oldest in Germany: they feature the prophets David, Jonah, Daniel, Moses, Hosea, and were perhaps part of a larger series, the others now being missing.

Flying buttress

flying buttressesbuttressesflying
The ribbed vaulting and flying buttresses of Gothic architecture concentrated the weight and thrust of the roof, freeing wall-space for larger clerestory fenestration.
The flying buttress originally helped bring the idea of open space and light to the cathedrals through stability and structure, by supporting the clerestory and the weight of the high roofs.

Passive house

Passivhauspassive housespassive housing
Modern clerestory windows may have another especially important role, besides daylighting and ventilation: they can be part of passive solar strategies, in very energy efficient buildings (Passive House Buildings, Zero Energy Buildings).
Use of passive natural ventilation is an integral component of passive house design where ambient temperature is conducive — either by singular or cross ventilation, by a simple opening or enhanced by the stack effect from smaller ingress with larger egress windows and/or clerestory-operable skylight.

London Underground Q Stock

Q StockQ' stockQ38
The last clerestory-roofed trains on the London Underground were the 'Q' stock, which were withdrawn from operation in 1971.
Trains were made up from cars of different ages with differing appearances, the older ones with clerestory roofs and the newer ones with flared sides.

Säteri roof

Säteritakseteritak
A säteritak ("manorial roof") is a type of roof, similar to a clerestory, that enjoyed great popularity in Sweden from the mid-seventeenth century.

Passive solar building design

passive solarPassive solar designpassive solar heating
Modern clerestory windows may have another especially important role, besides daylighting and ventilation: they can be part of passive solar strategies, in very energy efficient buildings (Passive House Buildings, Zero Energy Buildings).
Whilst high mounted clerestory window and traditional skylights can introduce daylight in poorly oriented sections of a building, unwanted heat transfer may be hard to control.

Architecture of cathedrals and great churches

Cathedral architecturecathedralsbasilica
Above the roof of the aisle are the clerestory windows which light the nave.

Pullman (car or coach)

PullmanPullman carPullman cars
The first Pullman coaches in England had clerestory roofs, and were imported and assembled at Derby, where Pullman set up an assembly plant in conjunction with the Midland Railway, a predecessor of the London Midland and Scottish Railway (LMS).

Passenger car (rail)

passenger carbaggage carcoaches
Clerestory roofs were used on railway carriages (known as "clerestory carriages") from the mid-nineteenth century to the 1930s.

Double-decker bus

double-deckerdouble decker busdouble-decker buses
Clerestories were also used in early double-decker buses, giving better ventilation and headroom in the centre corridor, as well as better illumination.

Architecture

architecturalarchitectarchitecturally
In architecture, a clerestory (lit. clear storey, also clearstory, clearstorey, or overstorey) is a high section of wall that contains windows above eye level.

Nave

navessingle-navesanctuary
Historically, clerestory denoted an upper level of a Roman basilica or of the nave of a Romanesque or Gothic church, the walls of which rise above the rooflines of the lower aisles and are pierced with windows.

Church (building)

churchchurcheschurch building
Historically, clerestory denoted an upper level of a Roman basilica or of the nave of a Romanesque or Gothic church, the walls of which rise above the rooflines of the lower aisles and are pierced with windows.

Ancient Egypt

EgyptEgyptianAncient Egyptian
The technology of the clerestory appears to originate in the temples of ancient Egypt.

Amarna

AkhetatenEATell el-Amarna
Clerestory appeared in Egypt at least as early as the Amarna period.