Cleveland Indians

Cleveland NapsIndiansClevelandCleveland BluesCLECleveland BluebirdsCleveland Blues (AL)Cleveland Bronchos/NapsCleveland IndianCleveland Bronchos
The Cleveland Indians are an American professional baseball team based in Cleveland, Ohio.wikipedia
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American League Central

Central DivisionAL CentralCentral
They compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member club of the American League (AL) Central division.
In 1994, the Cleveland Indians were sitting atop the wild-card standings and would have qualified for the postseason as the AL's first wild card but on August 12 of that year, the season came to an early end due to a players strike, cancelling the remainder of the regular season and postseason.

Cleveland

Cleveland, OhioCleveland, OHCleveland Ohio
The Cleveland Indians are an American professional baseball team based in Cleveland, Ohio.
By 1920, the year in which the Cleveland Indians won their first World Series championship, Cleveland had grown into a densely-populated metropolis of 796,841 with a foreign-born population of 30%, making it the fifth largest city in the nation.

Chief Wahoo

Common nicknames for the Indians include the "Tribe" and the "Wahoos", the latter referencing their former logo, Chief Wahoo.
Chief Wahoo was the logo of the Cleveland Indians, a Major League Baseball (MLB) franchise based in Cleveland, Ohio.

List of Major League Baseball franchise postseason droughts

List of Major League Baseball franchise post-season droughtsdroughtsList of Major Leaglongest championship drought
The team's current World Series championship drought is the [[List of Major League Baseball franchise postseason droughts#Longest current World Series championship drought|longest active]] among all 30 current Major League teams.

List of baseball nicknames

nicknamedDetroit Tigers NicknamesNicknames
Common nicknames for the Indians include the "Tribe" and the "Wahoos", the latter referencing their former logo, Chief Wahoo.

Nap Lajoie

Napoleon LajoieLajoieNapoleon "Nap" Lajoie
The name "Indians" originated from a request by club owner Charles Somers to baseball writers to choose a new name to replace "Cleveland Naps" following the departure of Nap Lajoie after the 1914 season.
He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Philadelphia Phillies, Philadelphia Athletics (twice), and Cleveland Naps between 1896 and 1916.

Goodyear, Arizona

GoodyearGoodyear, AZCity of Goodyear
The team's spring training facility is at Goodyear Ballpark in Goodyear, Arizona.
The city is home to the Goodyear Ballpark, where the Cleveland Indians and Cincinnati Reds of Major League Baseball hold spring training.

League Park

Dunn FieldLeague Park IICleveland League Park
Originally called the Cleveland Bluebirds, the team played in League Park until moving permanently to Cleveland Stadium in 1946.
The park was home to a number of professional sports teams, most notably the Cleveland Indians of Major League Baseball.

List of Major League Baseball longest winning streaks

longest winning streaksecond longest all-timeconsecutive games without a loss
From August 24 to September 14, 2017, the Indians won 22 consecutive games, the longest winning streak in American League history.

Major League Baseball

MLBMajor LeagueMajor Leagues
They compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member club of the American League (AL) Central division.
The 1920 season was notable for the death of Ray Chapman of the Cleveland Indians.

1901 Major League Baseball season

19011901 season
One of the American League's eight charter franchises, the major league incarnation of the club was founded in Cleveland in 1901.
The eight franchises that comprised the AL that year were the original Baltimore Orioles, the Boston Americans, the Chicago White Stockings, the Cleveland Blues, the Detroit Tigers, the original Milwaukee Brewers, the Philadelphia Athletics and the original Washington Senators.

Cy Young

Denton True "Cy" YoungDenton T. "Cy" Young
Led by native Ohioan Cy Young, the Spiders became a contender in the mid-1890s, playing in the Temple Cup Series (that era's World Series) twice and winning it in 1895.
He finished his career with the Cleveland Naps and Boston Rustlers, retiring in 1911.

Charles Somers

Charles W. Somers
The name "Indians" originated from a request by club owner Charles Somers to baseball writers to choose a new name to replace "Cleveland Naps" following the departure of Nap Lajoie after the 1914 season.
At the insistence of league president Ban Johnson, Somers and Jack Kilfoyl, who owned a popular Cleveland men's furnishings store, became the first owners of the Cleveland franchise.

Stan Coveleski

CoveleskiStanley CoveleskiStanley Coveleskie
Manager Lee Fohl, who had taken over in early 1915, acquired two minor league pitchers, Stan Coveleski and Jim Bagby and traded for center fielder Tris Speaker, who was engaged in a salary dispute with the Red Sox.
Stanley Anthony Coveleski (born Stanislaus Kowalewski, July 13, 1889 – March 20, 1984) was an American right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball who played for four American League (AL) teams between and, primarily the Cleveland Indians.

Bob Feller

Bob Feller MuseumFellerFeller, Bob
brought Cleveland a new superstar in 17-year-old pitcher Bob Feller, who came from Iowa with a dominating fastball.
Robert William Andrew Feller (November 3, 1918 – December 15, 2010), nicknamed "The Heater from Van Meter", "Bullet Bob", and "Rapid Robert", was an American baseball pitcher who played 18 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Cleveland Indians.

Ray Chapman

Shortstop Ray Chapman, who often crowded the plate, was batting against Carl Mays, who had an unusual underhand delivery.
He spent his entire career as a shortstop for the Cleveland Indians.

Goodyear Ballpark

Arizona
The team's spring training facility is at Goodyear Ballpark in Goodyear, Arizona.
Goodyear Ballpark is a stadium in Goodyear, Arizona (a western suburb of Phoenix) and part of a $108 million baseball complex that is the current spring training home of the Cleveland Indians and the Cincinnati Reds.

Joe Sewell

Rookie Joe Sewell hit .329 after replacing Chapman in the lineup.
Joseph Wheeler Sewell (October 9, 1898 – March 6, 1990) was a Major League Baseball infielder for the Cleveland Indians and New York Yankees.

Carl Mays

Mays
Shortstop Ray Chapman, who often crowded the plate, was batting against Carl Mays, who had an unusual underhand delivery.
Although he won over 200 games, 27 in 1921 alone, and was a member of four World Series-champion teams, Mays is primarily remembered for throwing the pitch that killed Ray Chapman of the Cleveland Indians on August 16, 1920.

Lou Boudreau

All Future and No PastBoudreau, Lou
By, Feller, along with Ken Keltner, Mel Harder and Lou Boudreau, led the Indians to within one game of the pennant.
He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for 15 seasons, primarily as a shortstop on the Cleveland Indians, and managed four teams for 15 seasons including 10 seasons as a player-manager.

Shoeless Joe Jackson

Joe JacksonShoeless" Joe JacksonShoeless Joe
Despite a strong lineup anchored by the potent Lajoie and Shoeless Joe Jackson, poor pitching kept the team below third place for most of the next decade.
He spent – as a member of the Philadelphia Athletics and with the minor league New Orleans Pelicans before joining the Cleveland Naps at the end of the 1910 season.

Tris Speaker

TrisTris Speaker Memorial Award
Manager Lee Fohl, who had taken over in early 1915, acquired two minor league pitchers, Stan Coveleski and Jim Bagby and traded for center fielder Tris Speaker, who was engaged in a salary dispute with the Red Sox.
In 1915, Speaker's batting average dropped to .322 from .338 the previous season; he was traded to the Cleveland Indians when he refused to take a pay cut.

Bill Veeck

Mike VeeckBill Veeck, Jr.Bill V. Veck
In, Bill Veeck formed an investment group that purchased the Cleveland Indians from Bradley's group for a reported $1.6 million.
Veeck was at various times the owner of the Cleveland Indians, St. Louis Browns and Chicago White Sox.

Boston Red Sox

Red SoxBoston AmericansBoston
Manager Lee Fohl, who had taken over in early 1915, acquired two minor league pitchers, Stan Coveleski and Jim Bagby and traded for center fielder Tris Speaker, who was engaged in a salary dispute with the Red Sox. The Cleveland franchise was among its eight charter members, and is one of four teams that remain in its original city, along with Boston, Chicago, and Detroit.
Following the 1915 season, Tris Speaker was traded to the Cleveland Indians.

Ken Keltner

By, Feller, along with Ken Keltner, Mel Harder and Lou Boudreau, led the Indians to within one game of the pennant.
He played almost his entire Major League Baseball career as a third baseman with the Cleveland Indians, until his final season when he played 13 games for the Boston Red Sox.