Click consonant

clicksclickclick consonantsclick languagelingual ingressiveclick soundstongue clicksclick languagesclickingbetter understanding of click sounds
Click consonants, or clicks, are speech sounds that occur as consonants in many languages of Southern Africa and in three languages of East Africa.wikipedia
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Lateral click

alveolar lateral clicklaterallateral clicks
Tsk! (American spelling) used to express disapproval or pity, the tchick! used to spur on a horse, and the clip-clop!'' sound children make with their tongue to imitate a horse trotting. The five click places of articulation with dedicated symbols in the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) are labial, dental, palatal ("palato-alveolar"), (post)alveolar ("retroflex") and lateral.
The lateral clicks are a family of click consonants found only in African languages.

Sandawe language

Sandawesad
The forward closure is then released, producing what may be the loudest consonants in the language, but in some languages such as Hadza and Sandawe, clicks can be more subtle and may even be mistaken for ejectives. Three languages in East Africa use clicks: Sandawe and Hadza of Tanzania, and Dahalo, an endangered South Cushitic language of Kenya that has clicks in only a few dozen words.
Sandawe is a "click language" spoken by about 60,000 Sandawe people in the Dodoma region of Tanzania.

Khoisan languages

KhoisanSanSan language
Clicks occur in all three Khoisan language families of southern Africa, where they may be the most numerous consonants.
Khoisan languages share click consonants and do not belong to other African language families.

Dental click

dentaldental clicksǀ
Examples familiar to English-speakers are the Tut-tut (British spelling) or ''Tsk! The five click places of articulation with dedicated symbols in the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) are labial, dental, palatal ("palato-alveolar"), (post)alveolar ("retroflex") and lateral.
Dental (or more precisely denti-alveolar) clicks are a family of click consonants found, as constituents of words, only in Africa and in the Damin ritual jargon of Australia.

Hadza language

HadzaHadzaneHatsa
The forward closure is then released, producing what may be the loudest consonants in the language, but in some languages such as Hadza and Sandawe, clicks can be more subtle and may even be mistaken for ejectives. Three languages in East Africa use clicks: Sandawe and Hadza of Tanzania, and Dahalo, an endangered South Cushitic language of Kenya that has clicks in only a few dozen words.
In the late 20th century Hadza was included in a proposed Khoisan language family, largely on the basis of its use of clicks, but this classification is no longer accepted.

Bilabial click

labialBilabial clicksʘ
The five click places of articulation with dedicated symbols in the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) are labial, dental, palatal ("palato-alveolar"), (post)alveolar ("retroflex") and lateral.
The bilabial clicks are a family of click consonants that sound something like a smack of the lips.

Palatal click

palatalǂpalatal clicks
The five click places of articulation with dedicated symbols in the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) are labial, dental, palatal ("palato-alveolar"), (post)alveolar ("retroflex") and lateral.
The palatal or palato-alveolar clicks are a family of click consonants found, as components of words, only in Africa.

Xhosa language

XhosaisiXhosaIsiXhosa language
In the southeast, in eastern South Africa, Swaziland, Lesotho, Zimbabwe and southern Mozambique, they were adopted from a Tuu language or languages by the languages of the Nguni cluster (especially Zulu, Xhosa and Phuthi, but also to a lesser extent Swazi and Ndebele), and spread from them in a reduced fashion to the Zulu-based pidgin Fanagalo, Sesotho, Tsonga, Ronga, the Mzimba dialect of Tumbuka and more recently to Ndau and urban varieties of Pedi, where the spread of clicks continues.
Xhosa is a Nguni Bantu language with click consonants and is one of the official languages of South Africa.

Ejective consonant

ejectiveejectives ejective
The forward closure is then released, producing what may be the loudest consonants in the language, but in some languages such as Hadza and Sandawe, clicks can be more subtle and may even be mistaken for ejectives.
Dahalo of Kenya, has ejectives, implosives, and click consonants.

Zulu language

ZuluisiZululanguage
In the southeast, in eastern South Africa, Swaziland, Lesotho, Zimbabwe and southern Mozambique, they were adopted from a Tuu language or languages by the languages of the Nguni cluster (especially Zulu, Xhosa and Phuthi, but also to a lesser extent Swazi and Ndebele), and spread from them in a reduced fashion to the Zulu-based pidgin Fanagalo, Sesotho, Tsonga, Ronga, the Mzimba dialect of Tumbuka and more recently to Ndau and urban varieties of Pedi, where the spread of clicks continues.

Airstream mechanism

airstreampulmonicairflow
The enclosed pocket of air is rarefied by a sucking action of the tongue (in technical terminology, clicks have a lingual ingressive airstream mechanism).
Lingual stops are more commonly known as clicks, and are almost universally ingressive.

Dahalo language

Dahalodal
Three languages in East Africa use clicks: Sandawe and Hadza of Tanzania, and Dahalo, an endangered South Cushitic language of Kenya that has clicks in only a few dozen words.
Dahalo has a highly diverse sound system using all four airstream mechanisms found in human language: clicks, ejectives, and implosives, as well as the universal pulmonic sounds.

Tsonga language

TsongaXitsongaXichangana
In the southeast, in eastern South Africa, Swaziland, Lesotho, Zimbabwe and southern Mozambique, they were adopted from a Tuu language or languages by the languages of the Nguni cluster (especially Zulu, Xhosa and Phuthi, but also to a lesser extent Swazi and Ndebele), and spread from them in a reduced fashion to the Zulu-based pidgin Fanagalo, Sesotho, Tsonga, Ronga, the Mzimba dialect of Tumbuka and more recently to Ndau and urban varieties of Pedi, where the spread of clicks continues.
Unlike some of the Nguni languages, Tsonga has very few words with click consonants, and these vary in place between dental and postalveolar.

Khoe languages

KhoeKhoe languageKhoe family
The second point of transfer was near the Caprivi Strip and the Okavango River where, apparently, the Yeyi language borrowed the clicks from a West Kalahari Khoe language; a separate development led to a smaller click inventory in the neighbouring Mbukushu, Kwangali, Gciriku, Kuhane and Fwe languages in Angola, Namibia, Botswana and Zambia.
The Khoe languages were the first Khoisan languages known to European colonists and are famous for their clicks, though these are not as extensive as in other Khoisan language families.

Fwe language

Fwe
The second point of transfer was near the Caprivi Strip and the Okavango River where, apparently, the Yeyi language borrowed the clicks from a West Kalahari Khoe language; a separate development led to a smaller click inventory in the neighbouring Mbukushu, Kwangali, Gciriku, Kuhane and Fwe languages in Angola, Namibia, Botswana and Zambia.
It is closely related to Kuhane, and is one of several Bantu languages of the Okavango which have click consonants.

Lardil language

Lardillbz
The only non-African language known to have clicks as regular speech sounds is Damin, a ritual code used by speakers of Lardil in Australia.
Damin is regarded by Lardil-speakers as a separate language and has the only phonological system outside Africa to use click consonants.

Yeyi language

YeyiShiyeyilanguage
The second point of transfer was near the Caprivi Strip and the Okavango River where, apparently, the Yeyi language borrowed the clicks from a West Kalahari Khoe language; a separate development led to a smaller click inventory in the neighbouring Mbukushu, Kwangali, Gciriku, Kuhane and Fwe languages in Angola, Namibia, Botswana and Zambia.
Indeed, it has the largest known inventory of clicks of any Bantu language, with dental, alveolar, palatal, and lateral articulations.

Consonant

consonantsCconsonantal
Click consonants, or clicks, are speech sounds that occur as consonants in many languages of Southern Africa and in three languages of East Africa.

Kwangali language

KwangaliRuKwangalikwn
The second point of transfer was near the Caprivi Strip and the Okavango River where, apparently, the Yeyi language borrowed the clicks from a West Kalahari Khoe language; a separate development led to a smaller click inventory in the neighbouring Mbukushu, Kwangali, Gciriku, Kuhane and Fwe languages in Angola, Namibia, Botswana and Zambia.
It is one of several Bantu languages of the Okavango which have click consonants; these are the dental clicks c and gc, along with prenasalization and aspiration.

Gciriku language

GcirikuManyoRumanyo
The second point of transfer was near the Caprivi Strip and the Okavango River where, apparently, the Yeyi language borrowed the clicks from a West Kalahari Khoe language; a separate development led to a smaller click inventory in the neighbouring Mbukushu, Kwangali, Gciriku, Kuhane and Fwe languages in Angola, Namibia, Botswana and Zambia.
It is one of several Bantu languages of the Okavango which have click consonants, as in ('bed'), ('flower'), and ('tortoise').

Mbukushu language

Mbukushumhw
The second point of transfer was near the Caprivi Strip and the Okavango River where, apparently, the Yeyi language borrowed the clicks from a West Kalahari Khoe language; a separate development led to a smaller click inventory in the neighbouring Mbukushu, Kwangali, Gciriku, Kuhane and Fwe languages in Angola, Namibia, Botswana and Zambia.
Mbukushu is one of several Bantu languages of the Okavango which have click consonants.

Damin

Damin language
The only non-African language known to have clicks as regular speech sounds is Damin, a ritual code used by speakers of Lardil in Australia.
Damin is the only click language outside Africa.

Tumbuka language

TumbukaChitumbukaChitimbuka
In the southeast, in eastern South Africa, Swaziland, Lesotho, Zimbabwe and southern Mozambique, they were adopted from a Tuu language or languages by the languages of the Nguni cluster (especially Zulu, Xhosa and Phuthi, but also to a lesser extent Swazi and Ndebele), and spread from them in a reduced fashion to the Zulu-based pidgin Fanagalo, Sesotho, Tsonga, Ronga, the Mzimba dialect of Tumbuka and more recently to Ndau and urban varieties of Pedi, where the spread of clicks continues.
The Mzimba dialect has been strongly influenced by Zulu (chiNgoni), even so far as to have clicks in words like chitha "urinate", which do not occur in other dialects.

Northern Sotho language

Northern SothoSepediPedi
In the southeast, in eastern South Africa, Swaziland, Lesotho, Zimbabwe and southern Mozambique, they were adopted from a Tuu language or languages by the languages of the Nguni cluster (especially Zulu, Xhosa and Phuthi, but also to a lesser extent Swazi and Ndebele), and spread from them in a reduced fashion to the Zulu-based pidgin Fanagalo, Sesotho, Tsonga, Ronga, the Mzimba dialect of Tumbuka and more recently to Ndau and urban varieties of Pedi, where the spread of clicks continues.
Urban varieties of Northern Sotho, such as Pretoria Sotho (actually a derivative of Tswana), have acquired clicks in an ongoing process of such sounds spreading from Nguni languages.

Ndau dialect

NdauCindauchiNdau
In the southeast, in eastern South Africa, Swaziland, Lesotho, Zimbabwe and southern Mozambique, they were adopted from a Tuu language or languages by the languages of the Nguni cluster (especially Zulu, Xhosa and Phuthi, but also to a lesser extent Swazi and Ndebele), and spread from them in a reduced fashion to the Zulu-based pidgin Fanagalo, Sesotho, Tsonga, Ronga, the Mzimba dialect of Tumbuka and more recently to Ndau and urban varieties of Pedi, where the spread of clicks continues.