Clive James

The Clive James ShowThe Crystal BucketClive Vivian Leopold JamesSaturday Night CliveClive [Jamespoem by Clive James
Clive James (7 October 1939 – 24 November 2019) was an Australian critic, broadcaster and writer who lived and worked in the United Kingdom from 1961 until his death in 2019.wikipedia
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...on Television

Tarrant on TVClive James on Television...on TV
He achieved mainstream success in the UK first as a writer for television, and eventually as the lead in his own programs, including ...on Television.
The show was first presented by TV critic and journalist Clive James between 1982 and 1988, before returning in 1997–98 and by celebrity chef Keith Floyd in 1989.

Sydney Push

push movementSydney "PushSydney Libertarians
He was educated at Sydney Technical High School (despite winning a bursary award to Sydney Boys High School) and the University of Sydney, where he studied English and psychology from 1957 to 1960, and became associated with the Sydney Push, a libertarian intellectual subculture.
Well known associates of the Push include Darcy Waters, Jim Baker, John Flaus, Harry Hooton, Margaret Fink, Sasha Soldatow, Lex Banning, David Perry, Eva Cox, Richard Appleton, Paddy McGuinness, David Makinson, Germaine Greer, Clive James, Robert Hughes, Frank Moorhouse, Robyn Davidson and Lillian Roxon.

Footlights

Cambridge FootlightsCambridge University Footlights Dramatic ClubFootlights Club
While there, he contributed to all the undergraduate periodicals, was a member and later President of the Cambridge Footlights, and appeared on University Challenge as captain of the Pembroke team, beating St Hilda's, Oxford, but losing to Balliol on the last question in a tied game.
She joined in October 1964 on the same day as Clive James and Russell Davies.

Visions Before Midnight

Selections from the column were published in three books — Visions Before Midnight, The Crystal Bucket and Glued to the Box – and finally in a compendium, On Television.
Visions Before Midnight is a selection of the television criticism written by Clive James during his first four years (1972–1976) as The Observer's weekly television critic.

Brett Whiteley

Brett Whiteley StudioBrett WhitelyWhiteley
During his first three years in London studying in Cambridge, he shared a flat with the Australian film director Bruce Beresford (disguised as "Dave Dalziel" in the first three volumes of James's memoirs), was a neighbour of Australian artist Brett Whiteley, became acquainted with Barry Humphries (disguised as "Bruce Jennings") and had a variety of occasionally disastrous short-term jobs – sheet metal worker, library assistant, photo archivist and market researcher.
Whiteley appears as a character in the book Falling Towards England by Clive James under the name Dibbs Buckley.

Germaine Greer

Greer, GermaineGermain GreerGermaine
His contemporaries at Cambridge included Germaine Greer (known as "Romaine Rand" in the first three volumes of his memoirs), Simon Schama and Eric Idle.
Clive James was involved with the group at the time.

Cultural Amnesia (book)

Cultural AmnesiaCultural Amnesia: Necessary Memories from History and the ArtsCultural Amnesia: Notes in the Margin of My Time
The Metropolitan Critic (1974), his first collection of literary criticism, was followed by At the Pillars of Hercules (1979), From the Land of Shadows (1982), Snakecharmers in Texas (1988), The Dreaming Swimmer (1992), Even As We Speak (2004), The Meaning of Recognition (2005) and Cultural Amnesia (2007), a collection of miniature intellectual biographies of over 100 significant figures in modern culture, history and politics.
Cultural Amnesia is a book of biographical essays by Clive James, first published in 2007.

Pembroke College, Cambridge

Pembroke CollegePembrokePembroke Hall, Cambridge
James gained a place at Pembroke College, Cambridge, to read English literature.
There are many clubs and societies organised by the students of the college, such as the boat club Pembroke College Boat Club and the college's dramatic society the Pembroke Players, which has been made famous by alumni such as Peter Cook, Eric Idle, Tim Brooke-Taylor, Clive James and Bill Oddie and is now in its 60th year.

Glued to the Box

Selections from the column were published in three books — Visions Before Midnight, The Crystal Bucket and Glued to the Box – and finally in a compendium, On Television.
Glued to the Box (TV Criticism from the Observer 1979–1982), is the third and final collection of the television criticism Clive James wrote for The Observer.

Pete Atkin

During the 1970s he also collaborated on six albums of songs with Pete Atkin:
Pete Atkin (born 22 August 1945) is a British singer-songwriter and radio producer notable for his 1970s musical collaborations with Clive James and for producing the BBC Radio 4 series This Sceptred Isle.

University Challenge

Christmas University ChallengeUniversity Challenge: The ProfessionalsBritish show of the same name
While there, he contributed to all the undergraduate periodicals, was a member and later President of the Cambridge Footlights, and appeared on University Challenge as captain of the Pembroke team, beating St Hilda's, Oxford, but losing to Balliol on the last question in a tied game.

Barry Humphries

John Barry HumphriesBarry Humphries AO CBEBarry Humphries' Flashbacks
During his first three years in London studying in Cambridge, he shared a flat with the Australian film director Bruce Beresford (disguised as "Dave Dalziel" in the first three volumes of James's memoirs), was a neighbour of Australian artist Brett Whiteley, became acquainted with Barry Humphries (disguised as "Bruce Jennings") and had a variety of occasionally disastrous short-term jobs – sheet metal worker, library assistant, photo archivist and market researcher.
It was filmed in England and Australia with an all-star cast including Spike Milligan, Peter Cook, Dennis Price, Dick Bentley, Willie Rushton, Julie Covington, Clive James and broadcaster Joan Bakewell.

Sydney Technical High School

Sydney Boy's Technical High School
He was educated at Sydney Technical High School (despite winning a bursary award to Sydney Boys High School) and the University of Sydney, where he studied English and psychology from 1957 to 1960, and became associated with the Sydney Push, a libertarian intellectual subculture.

So It Goes (TV series)

So It GoesSo It Goes TV series (Series 2, show 3)So It Goes'' (TV series)
James developed his television career as a guest commentator on various shows, including as an occasional co-presenter with Tony Wilson on the first series of So It Goes, the Granada Television pop music show.
It also included occasional non-punk guests such as journalist Clive James and comedian Peter Cook (hosting a 'Riff of the Month' competition).

Honi Soit

At the university, he contributed to the student newspaper, Honi Soit, and directed the annual students' union revue.
Former contributors include art critic Robert Hughes, poet Les Murray, film-maker Bruce Beresford, OZ magazine co-founder Richard Walsh, media personality Clive James, feminist Germaine Greer, journalists Bob Ellis and Laurie Oakes, Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull, High Court Judge Michael Kirby, author Madeleine St John, historian Keith Windschuttle, theatre director Kip Williams, intellectual Donald Horne, broadcaster Adam Spencer, and members of comedy troupe The Chaser.

Fame in the 20th Century

His major documentary series Fame in the 20th Century (1993) was broadcast in the United Kingdom by the BBC, in Australia by the ABC and in the United States by the PBS network.
Fame in the 20th Century is a 1993 BBC documentary television series and book by Clive James.

Libertarianism

libertarianlibertarianslibertarian state
He was educated at Sydney Technical High School (despite winning a bursary award to Sydney Boys High School) and the University of Sydney, where he studied English and psychology from 1957 to 1960, and became associated with the Sydney Push, a libertarian intellectual subculture.
Well known associates of the Push include Jim Baker, John Flaus, Harry Hooton, Margaret Fink, Sasha Soldatow, Lex Banning, Eva Cox, Richard Appleton, Paddy McGuinness, David Makinson, Germaine Greer, Clive James, Robert Hughes, Frank Moorhouse and Lillian Roxon.

Kogarah, New South Wales

KogarahKogarah Barracks, NSWHogarah
James was born Vivian Leopold James in Kogarah, a southern suburb of Sydney.

The Monthly

Monthly
He wrote literary criticism for newspapers, magazines and periodicals in Britain, Australia and the United States, including, among many others, the Australian Book Review, The Monthly, The Atlantic, the The New York Review of Books, The Liberal and the The Times Literary Supplement.
Anna Goldsworthy, Kerryn Goldsworthy, Ramachandra Guha, Gideon Haigh, M. J. Hyland, Linda Jaivin, Clive James, Kate Jennings, Paul Kelly, Benjamin Law, Amanda Lohrey, Mungo MacCallum, Shane Maloney, Robert Manne, David Marr, Maxine McKew, Drusilla Modjeska, Peter Robb, Kevin Rudd, Margaret Simons, Tim Soutphommasane, Lindsay Tanner, Malcolm Turnbull and Don Watson.

The Late Show (British TV programme)

The Late ShowLate ShowThe Late Review
He was also one of the original team of presenters of the BBC's The Late Show, hosting a round-table discussion on Friday nights.
Once a week, during the first two series, the slot featured a round-table discussion hosted by Clive James on Friday nights.

Jannali

Jannali East Public SchoolJannali, New South WalesJannali/Kareela
James, an only child, was brought up by his mother (Minora May, née Darke), a factory worker, in the Sydney suburbs of Kogarah and Jannali, living some years with his English maternal grandfather.

University of Sydney

The University of SydneySydney UniversitySydney
He was educated at Sydney Technical High School (despite winning a bursary award to Sydney Boys High School) and the University of Sydney, where he studied English and psychology from 1957 to 1960, and became associated with the Sydney Push, a libertarian intellectual subculture.
Author and university alumnus Clive James quipped in his 1981 autobiography that the motto loosely implies "Sydney University is really Oxford or Cambridge laterally displaced approximately 12,000 miles."

Margarita Pracatan

In 1995 he set up Watchmaker Productions to produce The Clive James Show for ITV, and a subsequent series launched the British career of singer and comedian Margarita Pracatan.
Margarita Pracatan is a Cuban novelty singer, who found success in the 1990s when Clive James had her perform live on his TV show on numerous occasions.

Les Murray (poet)

Les MurrayLes A. Murray(Les) Murray
In addition to the poetry and prose of James himself, the site featured the works of other literary figures such as Les Murray and Michael Frayn, as well as the works of painters, sculptors and photographers such as John Olsen and Jeffrey Smart.
Speaking about this time to Clive James he has said: "I was as soft-headed as you could imagine. I was actually hanging on to childhood because I hadn't had much teenage. My Mum died and my father collapsed. I had to look after him. So I was off the chain at last, I was in Sydney and I didn't quite know how to do adulthood or teenage. I was being coltish and foolish and childlike. I received the least distinguished degree Sydney ever issued. I don't think anyone's ever matched it."

Bruce Beresford

Beresford
During his first three years in London studying in Cambridge, he shared a flat with the Australian film director Bruce Beresford (disguised as "Dave Dalziel" in the first three volumes of James's memoirs), was a neighbour of Australian artist Brett Whiteley, became acquainted with Barry Humphries (disguised as "Bruce Jennings") and had a variety of occasionally disastrous short-term jobs – sheet metal worker, library assistant, photo archivist and market researcher.
Beresford attended the University of Sydney with critic and documentary maker Clive James, art critic and aficionado Robert Hughes, activist and author Germaine Greer, journalist Bob Ellis, poet Les Murray, and writer Mungo McCallum.