Clyde Drexler

Clyde "The Glide" DrexlerClyde “The Glide” DrexlerDrexlerDrexler, Clyde
Clyde Austin Drexler (born June 22, 1962) is an American former professional basketball player who is the commissioner of the Big3 3-on-3 basketball league.wikipedia
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Portland Trail Blazers

PortlandTrail BlazersBlazers
Nicknamed "Clyde the Glide", he played 15 seasons in the National Basketball Association (NBA), spending a majority of his career with the Portland Trail Blazers before finishing with the Houston Rockets. In the 1983 NBA draft Drexler was selected by the Portland Trail Blazers with the 14th overall pick.
Six Hall of Fame players have played for the Trail Blazers (Lenny Wilkens, Bill Walton, Clyde Drexler, Dražen Petrović, Arvydas Sabonis, and Scottie Pippen).

Houston Rockets

HoustonSan Diego RocketsRockets
Nicknamed "Clyde the Glide", he played 15 seasons in the National Basketball Association (NBA), spending a majority of his career with the Portland Trail Blazers before finishing with the Houston Rockets. On February 14, 1995, with the Blazers out of serious contention for a championship, Portland honored Drexler's request to be traded to a contender and sent the Blazer great back home to the Houston Rockets, along with Tracy Murray in exchange for Otis Thorpe, the draft rights of Marcelo Nicola, and a 1995 first round draft pick in mid-season, right before the trade deadline.
During the following season, reinforced by another All-Star, Clyde Drexler, the Rockets—in their fourth NBA Finals appearance in franchise history—repeated as champions with a four-game sweep of the Orlando Magic, who were led by a young Shaquille O'Neal and Penny Hardaway.

List of NBA All-Stars

NBA All-StarAll-StarAll-Star Game selections
He was a ten-time NBA All-Star and named one of the 50 Greatest Players in NBA History.

Big3

Big 3
Clyde Austin Drexler (born June 22, 1962) is an American former professional basketball player who is the commissioner of the Big3 3-on-3 basketball league.
On March 15, 2018, Clyde Drexler became the second Commissioner, replacing Roger Mason.

National Basketball Association

NBANBA.comBasketball Association of America
Nicknamed "Clyde the Glide", he played 15 seasons in the National Basketball Association (NBA), spending a majority of his career with the Portland Trail Blazers before finishing with the Houston Rockets.
The 1992 Olympic basketball Dream Team, the first to use current NBA stars, featured Michael Jordan as the anchor, along with Bird, Johnson, David Robinson, Patrick Ewing, Scottie Pippen, Clyde Drexler, Karl Malone, John Stockton, Chris Mullin, Charles Barkley, and star NCAA amateur Christian Laettner.

NBA Finals

NBA championshipNBA championshipsFinals
Drexler won an NBA championship with Houston in 1995, and earned a gold medal on the 1992 United States Olympic team known as "The Dream Team".
In 1990, the Pistons then went back-to-back after defeating the Clyde Drexler led Portland Trailblazers in five games, attaining the nickname "Bad Boys" due to its rough, physical play.

Michael Young (basketball, born 1961)

Michael YoungMichael Young (basketball)
After graduating in 1980, he was recruited by New Mexico State University, Texas Tech University, and the University of Houston, the latter after childhood friend Michael Young told an assistant to head coach Guy V. Lewis that Drexler was the best player he had faced in high school; Houston was able to recruit them both due to Drexler's friendship with Young and his desire to stay home.
With the Houston Cougars, he was part of Phi Slama Jama and was named Southwest Conference Men's Basketball Player of the Year in 1983, along with teammate Clyde Drexler.

1992 United States men's Olympic basketball team

Dream Team1992 Olympic team1992
Drexler won an NBA championship with Houston in 1995, and earned a gold medal on the 1992 United States Olympic team known as "The Dream Team".
On May 12, 1992, Clyde Drexler of the Portland Trail Blazers was chosen over Isiah Thomas of the Detroit Pistons for the final professional roster spot.

Phi Slama Jama

Alvin FranklinHoustonUniversity of Houston
Drexler and Young, along with Larry Micheaux and new recruit Hakeem Olajuwon (known then as Akeem Olajuwon), comprised the "Phi Slama Jama" basketball fraternity that gained national attention for its acrobatic, above-the-rim play.
The teams were coached by Guy V. Lewis and featured future Hall of Fame and NBA Top 50 players Hakeem Olajuwon and Clyde Drexler.

1983 NCAA Division I Men's Basketball Tournament

19831983 NCAA TournamentNCAA Tournament
He finished with 21 points, seven rebounds and six assists, but in the championship game against North Carolina State, Drexler failed to make an impact after picking up four fouls before halftime, and scored only four points on one-of-five shooting and two free throws in NC State's upset victory.
Houston was hampered by foul trouble that plagued star Clyde Drexler, who picked up four first half fouls.

1983 NBA draft

19831983 draft1983 first-round draft pick
In the 1983 NBA draft Drexler was selected by the Portland Trail Blazers with the 14th overall pick.
Sampson was joined in the Hall by University of Houston Cougars standout Clyde “The Glide” Drexler, taken number 14 by the Portland Trailblazers.

Hakeem Olajuwon

Akeem OlajuwonDream ShakeHakeem "The Dream" Olajuwon
Drexler and Young, along with Larry Micheaux and new recruit Hakeem Olajuwon (known then as Akeem Olajuwon), comprised the "Phi Slama Jama" basketball fraternity that gained national attention for its acrobatic, above-the-rim play. Despite finishing the regular season with a record of 47–35, which placed the Rockets 6th out of 8 playoff teams in the Western Conference, Drexler and long-time friend Hakeem Olajuwon helped propel them to an improbable second consecutive championship in 1995, sweeping the Orlando Magic.
He and his teammates (including Clyde Drexler) formed what was dubbed "Phi Slama Jama", the first slam-dunking "fraternity", so named because of its above-the-rim prowess.

Larry Micheaux

Drexler and Young, along with Larry Micheaux and new recruit Hakeem Olajuwon (known then as Akeem Olajuwon), comprised the "Phi Slama Jama" basketball fraternity that gained national attention for its acrobatic, above-the-rim play.
As a senior, he averaged 14 points and 7 rebounds a game during that season while playing alongside Akeem Olajuwon, Clyde Drexler, Alvin Franklin, Benny Anders, Reid Gettys and Michael Young.

Michael Jordan

JordanMichael Jordan Motorsports Michael Jordan
In the 1991–92 season he made the All-NBA First Team and finished second to Michael Jordan in MVP voting.
However, Trail Blazers general manager Stu Inman contended that it was not a matter of drafting a center, but more a matter of taking Sam Bowie over Jordan, in part because Portland already had Clyde Drexler, who was a guard with similar skills to Jordan.

Guy Lewis

Guy V. Lewis
After graduating in 1980, he was recruited by New Mexico State University, Texas Tech University, and the University of Houston, the latter after childhood friend Michael Young told an assistant to head coach Guy V. Lewis that Drexler was the best player he had faced in high school; Houston was able to recruit them both due to Drexler's friendship with Young and his desire to stay home.
Lewis coached many outstanding players, some who rank among the greatest of all time, including Elvin Hayes, Hakeem Olajuwon, Clyde Drexler, Otis Birdsong, Dwight Jones, Don Chaney, Louis Dunbar, and Ken Spain.

Otis Thorpe

On February 14, 1995, with the Blazers out of serious contention for a championship, Portland honored Drexler's request to be traded to a contender and sent the Blazer great back home to the Houston Rockets, along with Tracy Murray in exchange for Otis Thorpe, the draft rights of Marcelo Nicola, and a 1995 first round draft pick in mid-season, right before the trade deadline.
The team sent Thorpe to the Portland Trail Blazers in a deal for Clyde Drexler and Tracy Murray.

Chicago Bulls

ChicagoBullsCHI
He met Jordan's Chicago Bulls in the NBA Finals that same season only to fall short, as Jordan and the Bulls went on to win their second consecutive championship.
They swept the Miami Heat in the first round, the Knicks in seven games in the second round, then the Cleveland Cavaliers in six games in the Eastern Conference to the Finals for the second year in a row where they defeated the Clyde Drexler-led Portland Trail Blazers in six games.

University of Houston

HoustonHouston UniversityUniversity of Houston College of Pharmacy
After graduating in 1980, he was recruited by New Mexico State University, Texas Tech University, and the University of Houston, the latter after childhood friend Michael Young told an assistant to head coach Guy V. Lewis that Drexler was the best player he had faced in high school; Houston was able to recruit them both due to Drexler's friendship with Young and his desire to stay home.
See also Phi Slama Jama, the Cougars teams of the early 1980s that featured NBA legends Clyde Drexler and Hakeem Olajuwon.

Southwest Conference

SWCSouthwestAll-SWC
He averaged 15.2 points and 10.5 rebounds (second in the Southwest Conference) per game as a small forward as Houston finished 25–8.
Great SWC hoops players included the aforementioned Triplets, Akeem Olajuwon, Clyde Drexler, Vinnie Johnson, Jon Koncak, Alvin Robertson, Ricky Pierce, Darrell Walker, Joe Kleine, Day, Mayberry, Miller and U.S. Reed, among others.

Tracy Murray

On February 14, 1995, with the Blazers out of serious contention for a championship, Portland honored Drexler's request to be traded to a contender and sent the Blazer great back home to the Houston Rockets, along with Tracy Murray in exchange for Otis Thorpe, the draft rights of Marcelo Nicola, and a 1995 first round draft pick in mid-season, right before the trade deadline.
Murray spent two-and-a-half seasons with Portland before being dealt to the Houston Rockets on February 14, 1995, with guard Clyde Drexler in exchange for forward Otis Thorpe, the rights to Argentinian forward Marcelo Nicola and a 1995 first-round draft choice.

Oregon Sports Hall of Fame

State of Oregon Sports Hall of FameOregon Sports Hall of Fame (Multi-sport athlete)

Jake O'Donnell

During the 1995 NBA Playoffs, Drexler was ejected during a game between the Rockets and the Phoenix Suns by referee Jake O'Donnell, which allegedly stemmed from a personal feud between the two at the time.
O'Donnell's final game of his officiating career was marred by a controversial ejection of the Houston Rockets' Clyde Drexler during the 1995 NBA Playoffs, which allegedly stemmed from a personal feud between the two at the time.

1995 NBA Finals

1995NBA Finals1994-95
Despite finishing the regular season with a record of 47–35, which placed the Rockets 6th out of 8 playoff teams in the Western Conference, Drexler and long-time friend Hakeem Olajuwon helped propel them to an improbable second consecutive championship in 1995, sweeping the Orlando Magic.
On February 14, the Rockets acquired Clyde Drexler from the Portland Trail Blazers, but the trade of a hometown hero (Drexler was a teammate of Olajuwon at the University of Houston) did not improve matters, and the Rockets settled for the sixth seed with a 47–35 record.

South Park, Houston

South ParkSouth Park, Houston, Texas
Born in New Orleans, Louisiana, Drexler lived in the South Park area in Houston, Texas, and attended Ross Sterling High School in Houston, where he was a classmate of tennis player Zina Garrison.

Houston Cougars men's basketball

HoustonHouston CougarsUniversity of Houston
Drexler stayed with the Rockets for three more seasons before retiring from the NBA after the 1997–98 season in order to become head men's basketball coach at his alma mater, the University of Houston.
Among the outstanding players who Lewis coached are Elvin Hayes, Hakeem Olajuwon, Clyde Drexler, Otis Birdsong, Dwight Jones, Don Chaney and "Sweet" Lou Dunbar.