Clyde Tombaugh

C. W. TombaughClyde W. TombaughC. TombaughClyde William TombaughsatellitesTombaughTombaugh, Clyde W.Tombaugh, Clyde William
Clyde William Tombaugh (February 4, 1906 – January 17, 1997) was an American astronomer.wikipedia
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Streator, Illinois

StreatorStreator, ILHardscrabble
Tombaugh was born in Streator, Illinois, son of Muron Dealvo Tombaugh, a farmer, and his wife Adella Pearl Chritton.
The city is the hometown of Clyde Tombaugh, who in 1930 discovered the dwarf planet Pluto, the first object to be discovered in what would later be identified as the Kuiper belt; and George "Honey Boy" Evans, who wrote "In the Good Old Summer Time."

Kuiper belt

Kuiper belt objectKuiper belt objectsKuiper cliff
He discovered Pluto in 1930, the first object to be discovered in what would later be identified as the Kuiper belt.
Soon after Pluto's discovery by Clyde Tombaugh in 1930, Leonard pondered whether it was "not likely that in Pluto there has come to light the first of a series of ultra-Neptunian bodies, the remaining members of which still await discovery but which are destined eventually to be detected".

Lowell Observatory

FlagstaffFlagstaff ObservatoryLowell
He sent drawings of Jupiter and Mars to the Lowell Observatory, at Flagstaff, Arizona which offered him a job. While a young researcher working for the Lowell Observatory in Flagstaff, Arizona, Tombaugh was given the job to perform a systematic search for a trans-Neptunian planet (also called Planet X), which had been predicted by Percival Lowell and William Pickering.
It was at the Lowell Observatory that the dwarf planet Pluto was discovered in 1930 by Clyde Tombaugh.

1604 Tombaugh

The asteroid 1604 Tombaugh, discovered in 1931, is named after him.
It was named after the discoverer of Pluto, Clyde Tombaugh.

New Horizons

New Horizons KBO SearchNew HorizonNew Horizons mission
The call eventually led to the launch of the New Horizons space probe to Pluto in 2006. Following the passage on July 14, 2015 of Pluto by the New Horizons spacecraft the "Cold Heart of Pluto" was named Tombaugh Regio.
In August 1992, JPL scientist Robert Staehle called Pluto discoverer Clyde Tombaugh, requesting permission to visit his planet.

Burdett, Kansas

Burdett
After his family moved to Burdett, Kansas in 1922, Tombaugh's plans for attending college were frustrated when a hailstorm ruined his family's farm crops.
* Clyde Tombaugh, astronomer who discovered the dwarf planet Pluto in 1930, he lived in Burdett during part of his teens.

Planets beyond Neptune

Planet Xtenth planetunseen planet
While a young researcher working for the Lowell Observatory in Flagstaff, Arizona, Tombaugh was given the job to perform a systematic search for a trans-Neptunian planet (also called Planet X), which had been predicted by Percival Lowell and William Pickering.
Clyde Tombaugh's discovery of Pluto in 1930 appeared to validate Lowell's hypothesis, and Pluto was officially named the ninth planet.

Venetia Burney

Venetia Phair
The name "Pluto" was suggested by an 11-year-old English schoolgirl, Venetia Burney.
Venetia Katharine Douglas Burney (married name Phair, 11 July 1918 – 30 April 2009), as an English girl of 11 years old, was credited by Clyde Tombaugh with first suggesting the name Pluto for the planet he discovered in 1930.

Unidentified flying object

UFOUFOsunidentified flying objects
He called for the serious scientific research of unidentified flying objects, or UFOs.
Astronomer Clyde Tombaugh, who admitted to six UFO sightings, including three green fireballs, supported the Extraterrestrial hypothesis for UFOs and stated he thought scientists who dismissed it without study were being "unscientific."

Tombaugh Regio

The Heart (Pluto)
Following the passage on July 14, 2015 of Pluto by the New Horizons spacecraft the "Cold Heart of Pluto" was named Tombaugh Regio.
It is named after Clyde Tombaugh, the discoverer of Pluto.

New Mexico Museum of Space History

International Space Hall of FameNational Space Hall of FameThe New Mexico Museum of Space History
In 1980 he was inducted into the International Space Hall of Fame.
The Clyde W. Tombaugh IMAX Theater and Planetarium has a projection dome that doubles as an IMAX screen and as a planetarium.

Trans-Neptunian object

TNOtrans-Neptunian objectscolor indices
While a young researcher working for the Lowell Observatory in Flagstaff, Arizona, Tombaugh was given the job to perform a systematic search for a trans-Neptunian planet (also called Planet X), which had been predicted by Percival Lowell and William Pickering.
After Pluto's discovery, American astronomer Clyde Tombaugh continued searching for some years for similar objects, but found none.

Percival Lowell

LowellP. LowellLowell, Percival
While a young researcher working for the Lowell Observatory in Flagstaff, Arizona, Tombaugh was given the job to perform a systematic search for a trans-Neptunian planet (also called Planet X), which had been predicted by Percival Lowell and William Pickering. By 1965 Robert S. Richardson called Tombaugh one of two great living experienced visual observers as talented as Percival Lowell or Giovanni Schiaparelli.
In 1930 Clyde Tombaugh, working at the Lowell Observatory, discovered Pluto near the location expected for Planet X. Partly in recognition of Lowell's efforts, a stylized P-L monogram – the first two letters of the new planet's name and also Lowell's initials – was chosen as Pluto's astronomical symbol.

2839 Annette

It was discovered on 5 October 1929, by American astronomer Clyde Tombaugh at Lowell Observatory during his search for Pluto.

3754 Kathleen

It was discovered at the Lowell Observatory near Flagstaff, Arizona, on 16 March 1931, by American astronomer Clyde Tombaugh, who named it after his granddaughter Kathleen Clifford.

Blink comparator

blink comparingblinking techniqueProblicom
He then used a blink comparator to compare the different images.
The most notable body to be found using this technique is Pluto, discovered by Clyde Tombaugh in 1930.

Pluto

134340 Pluto(134340) Plutoescaped moon of Neptune
He discovered Pluto in 1930, the first object to be discovered in what would later be identified as the Kuiper belt. Following the passage on July 14, 2015 of Pluto by the New Horizons spacecraft the "Cold Heart of Pluto" was named Tombaugh Regio.
Pluto was discovered by Clyde Tombaugh in 1930 as the ninth planet from the Sun.

Jackson-Gwilt Medal

The Royal Astronomical Society awarded him the Jackson-Gwilt Medal in 1931.

New Mexico State University

New Mexico StateNew Mexico A&MNMSU
He worked at White Sands Missile Range in the early 1950s, and taught astronomy at New Mexico State University from 1955 until his retirement in 1973.
Notable faculty include Paul Bosland, an internationally recognized authority on chile who leads the university's chile breeding research program and directs the Chile Pepper Institute at NMSU, Clyde Tombaugh, an astronomer best known for his discovery of Pluto; Mark Medoff, playwright, screenwriter, director and actor, who wrote the Tony award winning Children of a Lesser God.

Astrograph

astrograph telescopeastrographic cameraastrographic telescopes
Tombaugh used the observatory's 13-inch astrograph to take photographs of the same section of sky several nights apart.
One well-known case of an astrograph used in a discovery is Clyde Tombaugh’s discovery of the dwarf planet Pluto in 1930.

William Henry Pickering

W. H. PickeringWilliam H. PickeringWilliam Pickering
While a young researcher working for the Lowell Observatory in Flagstaff, Arizona, Tombaugh was given the job to perform a systematic search for a trans-Neptunian planet (also called Planet X), which had been predicted by Percival Lowell and William Pickering.
Pluto was later discovered at Flagstaff by Clyde Tombaugh in 1930, but in any case it is now known that Pluto's mass is far too small to have appreciable gravitational effects on Uranus or Neptune, and the anomalies are accounted for when today's much more accurate values of planetary masses are used in calculating orbits.

Clayton Kershaw

KershawC. Kershaw
Through the daughter of his youngest brother Robert, he is the great-uncle of Los Angeles Dodgers pitcher Clayton Kershaw.
He is the great-nephew of astronomer Clyde Tombaugh, the discoverer of Pluto.

David H. Levy

D. H. LevyDavid LevyLevy
He has written 34 books, mostly on astronomical subjects, such as The Quest for Comets, a biography of Pluto-discoverer Clyde Tombaugh in 2006, and his tribute to Gene Shoemaker in Shoemaker by Levy.