Coat

coatsCoat (clothing)coat or jacketcoats and jacketsgarmentjacketjacketsouter garment🧥
A coat is a garment worn on the upper body by either sex, for warmth or fashion.wikipedia
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Clothing

apparelgarmentclothes
A coat is a garment worn on the upper body by either sex, for warmth or fashion.
For example, coats, hats, gloves and other outer layers are normally removed when entering a warm place.

Collar (clothing)

collarcollarswing collar
Other possible features include collars, shoulder straps and hoods.
In clothing, a collar is the part of a shirt, dress, coat or blouse that fastens around or frames the neck.

Zipper

zipzipperszip fastener
Coats typically have long sleeves and are open down the front, closing by means of buttons, zippers, hook-and-loop fasteners, toggles, a belt, or a combination of some of these.

Clothing terminology

van Dyke collar
(See also Clothing terminology.) The Oxford English Dictionary traces coat in its modern meaning to c. 1300, when it was written cote. The word coat stems from Old French and then Latin cottus. It originates from the Proto-Indo-European word for woolen clothes.
Coat remains a term for an overgarment, its essential meaning for the last thousand years (see Coat).

Overcoat

topcoattopcoatstop coat
The term "under-coat" is now archaic but denoted the fact that the word coat could be both the outermost layer for outdoor wear (overcoat) or the coat worn under that (under-coat). Nor do the terms tailcoat, morning coat or house coat denote types of overcoat.
An overcoat is a type of long coat intended to be worn as the outermost garment, which usually extends below the knee.

Tailcoat

morning coatdress coattails
Nor do the terms tailcoat, morning coat or house coat denote types of overcoat. Overcoats worn over the top of knee length coats (under-coats) such as frock coats, dress coats, and morning coats are cut to be a little longer than the under-coat so as to completely cover it, as well as being large enough to accommodate the coat underneath.
A tailcoat is a knee-length coat with the front of the skirt cut away, so as to leave only the rear section of the skirt, known as the tails.

Tailor

tailorsclothiermaster tailor
In tailoring circles, the tailor who makes all types of coats is called a coat maker.
Although the term dates to the thirteenth century, tailor took on its modern sense in the late eighteenth century, and now refers to makers of men's and women's suits, coats, trousers, and similar garments, usually of wool, linen, or silk.

Jacket

jacketsgarmentripped jackets
Similarly, in American English, the term sports coat is used to denote a type of jacket not worn as outerwear (overcoat) (sports jacket in British English).
A jacket is generally lighter, tighter-fitting, and less insulating than a coat, which is outerwear.

Cloak

cloaksboatcloakmantill
By the eighteenth century, overcoats had begun to supplant capes and cloaks as outerwear, and by the mid-twentieth century the terms jacket and coat became confused for recent styles; the difference in use is still maintained for older garments.
In full evening dress in the Western countries, ladies and gentlemen frequently use the cloak as a fashion statement, or to protect the fine fabrics of evening wear from the elements, especially where a coat would crush or hide the garment.

Cape

Cape short storycapescappa
By the eighteenth century, overcoats had begun to supplant capes and cloaks as outerwear, and by the mid-twentieth century the terms jacket and coat became confused for recent styles; the difference in use is still maintained for older garments.
In full evening dress, ladies frequently use the cape as a fashion statement, or to protect the wearer or the fine fabrics of their evening-wear from the elements, especially where a coat would crush—or hide—the garment.

Frock coat

redingotefrockcoatPrince Albert coat
Overcoats worn over the top of knee length coats (under-coats) such as frock coats, dress coats, and morning coats are cut to be a little longer than the under-coat so as to completely cover it, as well as being large enough to accommodate the coat underneath.
A frock coat is a man's coat characterised by a knee-length skirt (often cut just above the knee) all around the base, popular during the Victorian and Edwardian periods.

Raincoat

rainwearSlickerrain gear
A raincoat or slicker is a waterproof or water-resistant coat worn to protect the body from rain.

Fashion

fashion industrystylewomenswear
A coat is a garment worn on the upper body by either sex, for warmth or fashion.

Sleeve

sleevesset-in sleevesBatwing sleeves
Coats typically have long sleeves and are open down the front, closing by means of buttons, zippers, hook-and-loop fasteners, toggles, a belt, or a combination of some of these.

Button

buttonsbutton-upcloth buttons
Coats typically have long sleeves and are open down the front, closing by means of buttons, zippers, hook-and-loop fasteners, toggles, a belt, or a combination of some of these.

Velcro

human flyhook-and-loophook-and-loop fasteners
Coats typically have long sleeves and are open down the front, closing by means of buttons, zippers, hook-and-loop fasteners, toggles, a belt, or a combination of some of these.

Belt (clothing)

beltbeltsleather belt
Coats typically have long sleeves and are open down the front, closing by means of buttons, zippers, hook-and-loop fasteners, toggles, a belt, or a combination of some of these.

Shoulder strap

passantShoulder strapsnarrow strap
Other possible features include collars, shoulder straps and hoods.

Hood (headgear)

hoodhoodshooded
Other possible features include collars, shoulder straps and hoods.

English language

EnglishEnglish-languageen
Coat is one of the earliest clothing category words in English, attested as far back as the early Middle Ages.

Middle Ages

medievalmediaevalmedieval Europe
Coat is one of the earliest clothing category words in English, attested as far back as the early Middle Ages.

Oxford English Dictionary

OEDOxford DictionaryThe Oxford English Dictionary
(See also Clothing terminology.) The Oxford English Dictionary traces coat in its modern meaning to c. 1300, when it was written cote. The word coat stems from Old French and then Latin cottus. It originates from the Proto-Indo-European word for woolen clothes.

Proto-Indo-European language

Proto-Indo-EuropeanPIEIndo-European
(See also Clothing terminology.) The Oxford English Dictionary traces coat in its modern meaning to c. 1300, when it was written cote. The word coat stems from Old French and then Latin cottus. It originates from the Proto-Indo-European word for woolen clothes.

Chain mail

mailchainmailmail armour
An early use of coat in English is coat of mail (chainmail), a tunic-like garment of metal rings, usually knee- or mid-calf length.