Coat of arms

armscoats of armscoat-of-armsarmorial bearingscoats-of-armscrestdevicearmorialarms of officearmorists
A coat of arms is a heraldic visual design on an escutcheon (i.e., shield), surcoat, or tabard.wikipedia
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Escutcheon (heraldry)

escutcheonshieldescutcheons
A coat of arms is a heraldic visual design on an escutcheon (i.e., shield), surcoat, or tabard.
First, as the shield on which a coat of arms is displayed; second, a shield can itself be a charge within a coat of arms.

Roll of arms

armorialrolls of armsarmorials
The Roll of Arms is a collection of many coats of arms, and since the early Modern Age centuries it has been a source of information for public showing and tracing the membership of a noble family, and therefore its genealogy across time.
A roll of arms (or armorial) is a collection of coats of arms, usually consisting of rows of painted pictures of shields, each shield accompanied by the name of the person bearing the arms.

Achievement (heraldry)

achievementarmorial bearingsheraldic achievement
The coat of arms on an escutcheon forms the central element of the full heraldic achievement which in its whole consists of shield, supporters, crest, and motto.
Sometimes the term "coat of arms" is used to refer to the full achievement, but this usage is wrong in the strict sense of heraldic terminology, as a coat of arms refers to a garment with the escutcheon or armorial achievement embroidered on it.

Burgher arms

burgherburgher familiesburghers
Burgher arms are used in Northern Italy in the second half of the 13th century, and in the Holy Roman Empire The heraldic tradition and style of modern and historic Germany and the Holy Roman Empire — including national and civic arms, noble and burgher arms, ecclesiastical heraldry, heraldic displays, and heraldic descriptions — stand in contrast to Gallo-British, Latin and Eastern heraldry, and strongly influenced the styles and customs of heraldry in the Nordic countries, which developed comparatively late.
Burgher or Bourgeois arms are coats of arms borne by persons of the burgher social class of Europe (usually called bourgeois in English) since the Middle Ages.

Heraldry

heraldicheraldistarms
A coat of arms is a heraldic visual design on an escutcheon (i.e., shield), surcoat, or tabard. The heraldic tradition and style of modern and historic Germany and the Holy Roman Empire — including national and civic arms, noble and burgher arms, ecclesiastical heraldry, heraldic displays, and heraldic descriptions — stand in contrast to Gallo-British, Latin and Eastern heraldry, and strongly influenced the styles and customs of heraldry in the Nordic countries, which developed comparatively late.
The term "coat of arms" technically refers to the shield of arms itself, but the phrase is commonly used to refer to the entire achievement.

Motto

heraldic mottomottosmottoes
The coat of arms on an escutcheon forms the central element of the full heraldic achievement which in its whole consists of shield, supporters, crest, and motto.
In heraldry, a motto is often found below the shield in a banderole; this placement stems from the Middle Ages, in which the vast majority of nobles possessed a coat of arms and a motto.

Blazon

blazonedemblazonedemblazons
Unlike seals and other general emblems, heraldic "achievements" have a formal description called a blazon, which uses vocabulary that allows for consistency in heraldic depictions.
In heraldry and heraldic vexillology, a blazon is a formal description of a coat of arms, flag or similar emblem, from which the reader can reconstruct the appropriate image.

Crest (heraldry)

crestheraldic crestcrests
The coat of arms on an escutcheon forms the central element of the full heraldic achievement which in its whole consists of shield, supporters, crest, and motto.
The use of the crest and torse independently from the rest of the achievement, a practice which became common in the era of paper heraldry, has led the term "crest" to be frequently but erroneously used to refer to the arms displayed on the shield, or to the achievement as a whole.

Seal (emblem)

sealsealssignet ring
Unlike seals and other general emblems, heraldic "achievements" have a formal description called a blazon, which uses vocabulary that allows for consistency in heraldic depictions.
In Europe, although coats of arms and heraldic badges may well feature in such contexts as well as on seals, the seal design in its entirety rarely appears as a graphical emblem and is used mainly as originally intended: as an impression on documents.

Cadency

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Undifferenced arms are used only by one person at any given time.
In heraldry, cadency is any systematic way to distinguish arms displayed by decendants of the holder of a coat of arms when those family members have not been granted arms in their own right.

Nobility

noblemannoblenobles
The Roll of Arms is a collection of many coats of arms, and since the early Modern Age centuries it has been a source of information for public showing and tracing the membership of a noble family, and therefore its genealogy across time.
Various court and military positions were reserved by tradition for nobles who could "prove" an ancestry of at least seize quartiers (16 quarterings), indicating exclusively noble descent (as displayed, ideally, in the family's coat of arms) extending back five generations (all 16 great-great grandparents).

Genealogy

genealogistgenealogicalfamily history
The Roll of Arms is a collection of many coats of arms, and since the early Modern Age centuries it has been a source of information for public showing and tracing the membership of a noble family, and therefore its genealogy across time.
The term often overlapped with heraldry, in which the ancestry of royalty was reflected in their coats of arms.

Lord Lyon King of Arms

Lord LyonLyon King of ArmsLord Lyon King of Arms of Scotland
In Scotland, the Lord Lyon King of Arms has criminal jurisdiction to control the use of arms.
The Lord Lyon is responsible for overseeing state ceremonial in Scotland, for the granting of new arms to persons or organisations, and for confirming proven pedigrees and claims to existing arms as well as recognising clan chiefs after due diligence.

Surcoat

juponcoat armour
A coat of arms is a heraldic visual design on an escutcheon (i.e., shield), surcoat, or tabard.
From about the 12th century, knights wore long, flowing surcoats, frequently emblazoned with their personal arms, over their armor.

Logo

logotypecorporate logologo design
Heraldry has been compared to modern corporate logos.
600 BCE), trans-cultural diffusion of logographic languages, coats of arms, watermarks, silver hallmarks, and the development of printing technology.

Herald

heraldsherald of armsChief Herald
This has been carried out by heralds and the study of coats of arms is therefore called "heraldry".
It was possibly due to their role in managing the tournaments of the Late Middle Ages that heralds came to be associated with the regulation of the knights' coats of arms.

Earl Marshal

Earl Marshal of EnglandMarshal of EnglandLord Marshal
In reference to a dispute over the exercise of authority over the Officers of Arms in England, Arthur Annesley, 1st Earl of Anglesey, Lord Privy Seal, declared on 16 June 1673 that the powers of the Earl Marshal were "to order, judge, and determine all matters touching arms, ensigns of nobility, honour, and chivalry; to make laws, ordinances, and statutes for the good government of the Officers of Arms; to nominate Officers to fill vacancies in the College of Arms; to punish and correct Officers of Arms for misbehaviour in the execution of their places".
In conjunction with the Lord High Constable, he had held a court, known as the Court of Chivalry, for the administration of justice in accordance with the law of arms, which was concerned with many subjects relating to military matters, such as ransom, booty and soldiers' wages, and including the misuse of armorial bearings.

Genealogical Office

Chief Herald of IrelandOffice of the Chief Herald of IrelandChief Herald
Heraldry in the Republic of Ireland is regulated by the Government of Ireland, by the Genealogical Office through the Office of the Chief Herald of Ireland.
The Chief Herald authorises the granting of arms to Irish bodies and Irish people, including descendants of emigrants.

College of Arms

College of HeraldsRoyal LicenceDerby House
In England, for example, the granting of arms is and has been controlled by the College of Arms.
The heralds are appointed by the British Sovereign and are delegated authority to act on behalf of the Crown in all matters of heraldry, the granting of new coats of arms, genealogical research and the recording of pedigrees.

Coat of arms of San Marino

coat of armsSan Marinocoat of arms of the republic
At a national level, "coats of arms" were generally retained by European states with constitutional continuity of more than a few centuries, including constitutional monarchies like Denmark as well as old republics like San Marino and Switzerland.
The coat of arms of San Marino probably originated in the fourteenth century.

Fleur-de-lis

fleur-de-lysfleurs-de-lisfleur de lys
In France, the coat of arms is based on the Fleur-de-lys and the Rule of Tinctures used in English heraldry as well.
While the fleur-de-lis has appeared on countless European coats of arms and flags over the centuries, it is particularly associated with the French monarchy in a historical context and continues to appear in the arms of the King of Spain (from the French House of Bourbon), the Grand Duke of Luxembourg and members of the House of Bourbon.

Nordic countries

NordicNordic regionNordic country
The heraldic tradition and style of modern and historic Germany and the Holy Roman Empire — including national and civic arms, noble and burgher arms, ecclesiastical heraldry, heraldic displays, and heraldic descriptions — stand in contrast to Gallo-British, Latin and Eastern heraldry, and strongly influenced the styles and customs of heraldry in the Nordic countries, which developed comparatively late.

Ireland King of Arms

An earlier Ireland King of Arms was created by King Richard II in 1392 and discontinued by King Henry VII in 1487.
The last holder of the office, Walter Bellinger, did exercise the heraldic prerogative of a king of arms to grant armorial bearings, however two of his grants were annulled or regranted by other kings of arms as they felt he encroached on their provinces.

Norroy and Ulster King of Arms

Norroy King of ArmsUlster King of ArmsNorroy and Ulster
In Ireland the usage and granting of coats of arms was strictly regulated by the Ulster King of Arms from the office's creation in 1552.
The arms of The new office of Norroy and Ulster King of Arms were devised in 1980 based on elements from the arms of the two former offices.

Canadian Heraldic Authority

The Canadian Heraldic AuthorityChancellery of Honoursthe country's heraldic authority
The Canadian Heraldic Authority is situated at Rideau Hall.
The authority is responsible for the creation and granting of new coats of arms (armorial bearings), flags, and badges for Canadian citizens, government agencies, municipal, civic and other corporate bodies.