A report on Codex Marchalianus

Page of the codex with text of Ezek 5:12–17
Folio 283 of the codex with text of Ezek 1:28–2:6
Daniel 1–9 in Tischendorf's facsimile edition (1869)

6th-century Greek manuscript copy of the Greek version of the Hebrew Bible known as the Septuagint.

- Codex Marchalianus
Page of the codex with text of Ezek 5:12–17

5 related topics with Alpha

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Page from Codex Vaticanus; ending of 2 Thes and beginning of Heb

Codex Vaticanus

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The Codex Vaticanus (The Vatican, Bibl. Vat., Vat.

The Codex Vaticanus (The Vatican, Bibl. Vat., Vat.

Page from Codex Vaticanus; ending of 2 Thes and beginning of Heb
Ending of Luke and Beginning of John on the same page
A section of the codex containing 1 Esdras 2:1–8
The end of Mark in Vaticanus contains an empty column after Verse 16:8, possibly suggesting that the scribe was aware of the missing ending. It is the only empty New Testament column in the Codex.
2 Epistle of John in the codex
The Great Hall, Vatican Library, photographed by William H. Rau
In 1843 Tischendorf was permitted to make a facsimile of a few verses.
Angelo Mai prepared first facsimile edition of the New Testament text of the codex
Vaticanus in facsimile edition (1868), page with text of Matthew 1:22–2:18
Exhibition in Warsaw (2015)

The manuscript is in quarto volume, written on 759 leaves of fine and thin vellum (sized, although originally bigger), in uncial letters, arranged in quires of five sheets or ten leaves each, similar to Codex Marchalianus or Codex Rossanensis; but unlike Codex Sinaiticus which has an arrangement of four or three sheets.

William Shakespeare's will, written in secretary hand

Palaeography

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Study of historic writing systems and the deciphering and dating of historical manuscripts, including the analysis of historic handwriting.

Study of historic writing systems and the deciphering and dating of historical manuscripts, including the analysis of historic handwriting.

William Shakespeare's will, written in secretary hand
Drawing of the hieroglyphic seal found in the Troy VIIb layer
Table showing the Mandaic alphabet (Abagada) with some of the mysteries represented by the letters
Greek minuscule, 15th-century manuscript of Aristotle.
Detail of the Berlin papyrus 9875 showing the 5th column of Timotheus' Persae, with a coronis symbol to mark the end.
The Derveni Papyrus, a Greek Macedonian philosophical text dating around 340 BC, considered Europe's oldest manuscript
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Greek papyrus with Homer's verses, 1st century BC
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Copy of Herculanean Rolls, Greek papyrus 157–152
Section of the Codex Alexandrinus, the oldest Greek witness of the Byzantine text in the Gospels.
Variants of paragraphos
Paper strip with writing in Kharoṣṭhī, 2nd–5th century
Rigveda manuscript in Devanāgarī (early 19th century)
Coin of Vikramadytia Chandragupta II with the name of the king in Brahmi script, 5th century
Folio14 recto of the Vergilius Romanus written in rustic capitals, also contains an author portrait of Virgil.
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Latin script
Page from the Magdeburg's Chronica archiepiscoporum
A 10th-century codex of Origo gentis Langobardorum from Reims
8th-century Merovingian script
Alphabet in Visigothic script
A page in Carolingian minuscule (Book of Exodus)
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Frontispiece, handwritten in Early New High German, of the so-called Stadtbuch from Bolzano, dated 1472
Handwriting by Niccolò de' Niccoli (1364–1437), which served as the origin of italic type.

A different type of uncials, derived from the Chancery hand and seen in two papyrus examples of the Festal letters despatched annually by the Patriarch of Alexandria, was occasionally used, the best known example being the Codex Marchalianus (6th or 7th century).

Fragment of a Septuagint: A column of uncial book from 1 Esdras in the Codex Vaticanus c. 325–350 CE, the basis of Sir Lancelot Charles Lee Brenton's Greek edition and English translation

Septuagint

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Earliest extant Greek translation of books from the Hebrew Bible.

Earliest extant Greek translation of books from the Hebrew Bible.

Fragment of a Septuagint: A column of uncial book from 1 Esdras in the Codex Vaticanus c. 325–350 CE, the basis of Sir Lancelot Charles Lee Brenton's Greek edition and English translation
Beginning of the Letter of Aristeas to Philocrates (Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana, 11th century)
The inter-relationship between significant ancient Old Testament manuscripts (some identified by their siglum). LXX denotes the original Septuagint.

The Codex Marchalianus is another notable manuscript.

The Tetragrammaton in Phoenician (12th century BCE to 150 BCE), Paleo-Hebrew (10th century BCE to 135 CE), and square Hebrew (3rd century BCE to present) scripts

Tetragrammaton

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Four-letter Hebrew theonym , the name of God in Judaism and Christianity.

Four-letter Hebrew theonym , the name of God in Judaism and Christianity.

The Tetragrammaton in Phoenician (12th century BCE to 150 BCE), Paleo-Hebrew (10th century BCE to 135 CE), and square Hebrew (3rd century BCE to present) scripts
Transcription of the divine name as ΙΑΩ in the 1st-century BCE Septuagint manuscript 4Q120
The Mesha Stele bears the earliest known reference (840 BCE) to the Israelite god Yahweh.
YHWH in one of the Lachish letters
Tetragrammaton written in paleo-Hebrew script on Greek Minor Prophets Scroll from Nahal Hever
Petrus Alphonsi's early 12th-century Tetragrammaton-Trinity diagram, rendering the name as "IEVE", which in contemporary letters is "IEUE".
Tetragrammaton at the Fifth Chapel of the Palace of Versailles, France.
A tetractys of the letters of the Tetragrammaton adds up to 72 by gematria.
Tetragrammaton by Francisco Goya: "The Name of God", YHWH in triangle, detail from fresco Adoration of the Name of God, 1772
The Tetragrammaton as represented in stained glass in an 1868 Episcopal Church in Iowa
The Tetragrammaton on the Tympanum of the Roman Catholic Basilica of St. Louis, King of France in Missouri

25) ** Codex Marchalianus – In addition to the Septuagint text of the prophets (with ), the manuscript contains marginal notes from a hand "not much later than the original scribe" indicating Hexaplaric variations, each identified as from Aquila, Symmachus or Theodotion. Marginal notes on some of the prophets contain πιπι to indicate that in the text corresponds to the Tetragrammaton. Two marginal notes at Ezekiel 1:2 and 11:1 use the form ιαω with reference to the Tetragrammaton.

Giuseppe Cozza-Luzi

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Italian savant and abbot of the Basilian monastery of Grottaferrata near Rome.

Italian savant and abbot of the Basilian monastery of Grottaferrata near Rome.

He edited the text of Codex Marchalianus (Prophetarum codex Graecus Vaticanus 2125 (Romae, 1890)).