Cognitive therapy

cognitivecognitive psychotherapycognitive behavioural therapycognitive behavioral therapyautomatic thoughtsBehavioral experiment (cognitive therapy)cognitive behavior therapycognitive behavioralcognitive behaviour therapistcognitive theory
Cognitive therapy (CT) is a type of psychotherapy developed by American psychiatrist Aaron T. Beck.wikipedia
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Aaron T. Beck

Aaron Beckautomatic thoughtsBeck, A.T
Cognitive therapy (CT) is a type of psychotherapy developed by American psychiatrist Aaron T. Beck.
He is regarded as the father of cognitive therapy, and his pioneering theories are widely used in the treatment of clinical depression.

Psychotherapy

psychotherapistpsychotherapeutictherapy
Cognitive therapy (CT) is a type of psychotherapy developed by American psychiatrist Aaron T. Beck.
Independently a few years later, psychiatrist Aaron T. Beck developed a form of psychotherapy known as cognitive therapy.

Cognitive behavioral therapy

cognitive behavioural therapycognitive-behavioral therapycognitive behavior therapy
CT is one of the therapeutic approaches within the larger group of cognitive behavioral therapies (CBT) and was first expounded by Beck in the 1960s. Behavioral modification techniques and cognitive therapy techniques became joined together, giving rise to cognitive behavioral therapy.
CBT may be delivered in conjunction with a variety of diverse but related techniques such as exposure therapy, stress inoculation, cognitive processing therapy, cognitive therapy, relaxation training, dialectical behavior therapy, and acceptance and commitment therapy.

Arbitrary inference

Beck initially focused on depression and developed a list of "errors" (cognitive distortion) in thinking that he proposed could maintain depression, including arbitrary inference, selective abstraction, over-generalization, and magnification (of negatives) and minimization (of positives).
Arbitrary inference is a classic tenet of cognitive therapy created by Aaron T. Beck in 1979.

Behaviorism

behavioristbehaviourismbehavior analysis
The new cognitive approach came into conflict with the behaviorism ascendant at the time, which denied that talk of mental causes was scientific or meaningful, rather than simply assessing stimuli and behavioral responses.
This shift was due to methodological behaviorism being highly criticized for not examining mental processes, and this led to the development of the cognitive therapy movement.

Albert Ellis

EllisDr. Albert Ellis
Albert Ellis had been working on similar ideas since the 1950s (Ellis, 1956).
From then, CBT gradually became one of the most popular systems of psychotherapy in many countries, mainly due to the large body of rigorously conducted research that underpinned the work of the cognitive therapy school (a key part of the CBT family) founded by Aaron T. Beck.

Rational emotive behavior therapy

rational emotive therapyrational-emotive therapyREBT
He called his approach Rational Therapy (RT) at first, then Rational Emotive Therapy (RET) and later Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy (REBT).
This was around a decade before psychiatrist Aaron Beck first set forth his "cognitive therapy", after Ellis had contacted him in the mid 1960s.

Selective abstraction

adds to the public's misconception
Beck initially focused on depression and developed a list of "errors" (cognitive distortion) in thinking that he proposed could maintain depression, including arbitrary inference, selective abstraction, over-generalization, and magnification (of negatives) and minimization (of positives).
It commonly appears in Aaron T. Beck's work in cognitive therapy.

Cognitive distortion

cognitive distortionsdistortionpsychopathic fiction
Beck initially focused on depression and developed a list of "errors" (cognitive distortion) in thinking that he proposed could maintain depression, including arbitrary inference, selective abstraction, over-generalization, and magnification (of negatives) and minimization (of positives).
In 1972, psychiatrist, psychoanalyst, and cognitive therapy scholar Aaron T. Beck published Depression: Causes and Treatment. He was dissatisfied with the conventional Freudian treatment of depression, because there was no empirical evidence for the success of Freudian psychoanalysis.

Socratic questioning

SocraticquestioningSocratic questions
Socratic questioning: involves the creation of a series of questions to a) clarify and define problems, b) assist in the identification of thoughts, images and assumptions, c) examine the meanings of events for the patient, and d) assess the consequences of maintaining maladaptive thoughts and behaviors.
Socratic questioning has also been used in psychotherapy, most notably as a cognitive restructuring technique in classical Adlerian psychotherapy, logotherapy, rational emotive behavior therapy, cognitive therapy, and logic-based therapy.

Cognitive shifting

cognitive-shifting
Cognitive-shifting
In the general framework of cognitive therapy and awareness management, cognitive shifting refers to the conscious choice to take charge of one's mental habits—and redirect one's focus of attention in helpful, more successful directions.

Cognitive analytic therapy

CATCognitive Analytic PsychotherapistCognitive Analytic Therapy (CAT)
Cognitive analytic therapy
He proposed a shorter, more active form of therapy which integrated elements from cognitive therapy practice (such as goal setting and Socratic questioning) into analytic practice.

Beck's cognitive triad

cognitive triadnegative triad
Beck's negative triad holds that depressed people have negative thoughts about themselves, their experiences in the world, and the future.
Cognitive therapy

David D. Burns

Burns, D. D.
David D. Burns
Burns was an early student of Aaron T. Beck, who developed cognitive therapy during the 1960s and 1970s.

History of psychotherapy

Psychological Clinic
History of psychotherapy
During the 1950s, Albert Ellis developed the first form of cognitive behavioral therapy, Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy (REBT) and few years later Aaron T. Beck developed cognitive therapy.

Psychiatrist

psychiatristsclinical psychiatristconsultant psychiatrist
Cognitive therapy (CT) is a type of psychotherapy developed by American psychiatrist Aaron T. Beck.

Cognitive model

cognitive modelingcognitive modellingpsychological model
Cognitive therapy is based on the cognitive model, which states that thoughts, feelings and behavior are all connected, and that individuals can move toward overcoming difficulties and meeting their goals by identifying and changing unhelpful or inaccurate thinking, problematic behavior, and distressing emotional responses.

Psychodynamics

psychodynamicpsychodynamic theorydynamic psychology
Becoming disillusioned with long-term psychodynamic approaches based on gaining insight into unconscious emotions and drives, Beck came to the conclusion that the way in which his patients perceived, interpreted and attributed meaning in their daily lives—a process scientifically known as cognition—was a key to therapy.

Cognition

cognitivecognitive functioncognitive processes
Becoming disillusioned with long-term psychodynamic approaches based on gaining insight into unconscious emotions and drives, Beck came to the conclusion that the way in which his patients perceived, interpreted and attributed meaning in their daily lives—a process scientifically known as cognition—was a key to therapy.

Behavior modification

behavioral modificationbehaviour modificationbehavioral interventions
Behavioral modification techniques and cognitive therapy techniques became joined together, giving rise to cognitive behavioral therapy.

Stoicism

StoicStoicsStoic philosopher
Precursors of certain fundamental aspects of cognitive therapy have been identified in various ancient philosophical traditions, particularly Stoicism.

Depression (mood)

depressiondepressedmelancholy
Beck initially focused on depression and developed a list of "errors" (cognitive distortion) in thinking that he proposed could maintain depression, including arbitrary inference, selective abstraction, over-generalization, and magnification (of negatives) and minimization (of positives).

Mental disorder

mental illnessnervous breakdownmentally ill
The GCM is an update of Beck's model that proposes that mental disorders can be differentiated by the nature of their dysfunctional beliefs.

Conceptual framework

frameworkframeworksconceptual
The GCM includes a conceptual framework and a clinical approach for understanding common cognitive processes of mental disorders while specifying the unique features of the specific disorders.

Mental process

mental functionmental processescognitive processes
The GCM includes a conceptual framework and a clinical approach for understanding common cognitive processes of mental disorders while specifying the unique features of the specific disorders.