Coir

coconut fibreCoco peatcoconut coirChoruscoco fibercoconut fibrescoconut huskcoconut husk chipscoconut ropecoir matting
Coir, or coconut fibre, is a natural fibre extracted from the husk of coconut and used in products such as floor mats, doormats, brushes and mattresses.wikipedia
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Coconut

coconut palmCocos nuciferacoconuts
Coir, or coconut fibre, is a natural fibre extracted from the husk of coconut and used in products such as floor mats, doormats, brushes and mattresses.
Mature, ripe coconuts can be used as edible seeds, or processed for oil and plant milk from the flesh, charcoal from the hard shell, and coir from the fibrous husk.

Natural fiber

natural fibrenaturalfiber
Coir, or coconut fibre, is a natural fibre extracted from the husk of coconut and used in products such as floor mats, doormats, brushes and mattresses.

Mat

mattingdoormatdoormats
Red coir is used in floor mats and doormats, brushes, mattresses, floor tiles and sacking.
In the United Kingdom, under the name of "coir" matting, a large amount of a coarse kind of carpet is made from coconut fibre; and the same material, as well as strips of cane, manila hemp, various grasses and rushes, is largely employed in various forms for making doormats.

Mattress

mattressesinnerspring mattressbed mattress
Red coir is used in floor mats and doormats, brushes, mattresses, floor tiles and sacking.
Kapok is a common mattress material in Southeast Asia, and coir in South Asia.

Retting

rettedretting pondwater retting
During this time, micro-organisms break down the plant tissues surrounding the fibres to loosen them — a process known as retting.
It is used in the production of fibre from plant materials such as flax and hemp stalks and coir from coconut husks.

Soil conditioner

soil amendmentsoil amendmentssoil conditioning
Coco peat is used as a soil conditioner.
Some examples include biochar, bone meal, blood meal, coffee grounds, compost, compost tea, coir, manure, straw, peat, sphagnum moss, vermiculite, sulfur, lime, hydroabsorbant polymers, and biosolids.

Twine

stringbinder twineat Ki
A small amount is also made into twine.
Natural fibres used for making twine include, wool, cotton, sisal, jute, hemp, henequen, and coir.

Rope

cordagecordropemaker
Ropes and cordage have been made from coconut fibre since ancient times.
Common natural fibres for rope are manila hemp, hemp, linen, cotton, coir, jute, straw, and sisal.

Sphagnum

sphagnum mosspeat mossbog moss
In agriculture and horticulture, coir is a substitute for sphagnum (peat moss) and peat because it is widely available and environmentally friendly.
Coir has also been touted as a sustainable alternative to peat moss in growing media.

Coir Board of India

Coir Board
45 of 1953) for the promotion and development of the coir (coconut fibre) industry in India.

Coconut production in Kerala

Various terms like Copra and Coir are derived from the native Malayalam language.

Kerala

Kerala stateKerala, Indiastate of Kerala
India, mainly in Pollachi and the coastal region of Kerala State, produces 60% of the total world supply of white coir fibre.
Traditional industries manufacturing items; coir, handlooms, and handicrafts employ around one million people.

Vermiculite

ZonoliteE561
The coir is usually mixed with vermiculite and pasteurised with boiling water.

Natural rope

Cotton, sisal, manila, coir, and papyrus are materials that can be used to create a natural rope.

Husk

hulledhullhulling
Coir, or coconut fibre, is a natural fibre extracted from the husk of coconut and used in products such as floor mats, doormats, brushes and mattresses.

Dravidian languages

DravidianDravidian languageSouthern
The name coir comes from kayar, a Dravidian word for cord, used Tamil, with neither language clearly proven to be the origin.

Tamil language

TamilTamil-languageta
The name coir comes from kayar, a Dravidian word for cord, used Tamil, with neither language clearly proven to be the origin.

Rigging

rigriggedrigger
Arab writers of the 11th century AD referred to the extensive use of coir for ship ropes and rigging.

Cellulose

cellulolyticcellulosiccellulose ester
The individual fibre cells are narrow and hollow, with thick walls made of cellulose.

Lignin

lignifiedlignificationlignins
They are pale when immature, but later become hardened and yellowed as a layer of lignin is deposited on their walls.

Flax

linseedflaxseedLinum usitatissimum
Mature brown coir fibres contain more lignin and less cellulose than fibres such as flax and cotton, so are stronger but less flexible.

Cotton

cotton woolcotton industrycotton fiber
Mature brown coir fibres contain more lignin and less cellulose than fibres such as flax and cotton, so are stronger but less flexible.

Copra

kopraCoconut meatcopra cake
Brown fibre is obtained by harvesting fully mature coconuts when the nutritious layer surrounding the seed is ready to be processed into copra and desiccated coconut.

Microorganism

microorganismsmicrobemicrobes
During this time, micro-organisms break down the plant tissues surrounding the fibres to loosen them — a process known as retting.