Colchis and its eastern neighbor Iberia.
Map of Colchis and Iberia by Christoph Cellarius printed in Leipzig in 1706
"Gorgania" i.e. Georgia on Fra Mauro map
Jason and the Argonauts arriving at Colchis. The Argonautica tells the myth of their voyage to retrieve the Golden Fleece. This painting is located in the Palace of Versailles.
Second century BC Greek bronze torso from Colchis, Georgian National Museum
Patera depicting Marcus Aurelius uncovered in central Georgia, 2nd century AD
Colchian pendants, riders and horses on wheeled platforms, Georgian National Museum
Northwestern Georgia is home to the medieval defensive Svan towers of Ushguli
Gelati Monastery, a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
Queen Tamar, the first woman to rule medieval Georgia in her own right.
King Vakhtang VI, a Georgian monarch caught between rival regional powers
The reign of George XII was marked by instability.
Noe Zhordania, Prime Minister of Georgia who was exiled to France after the Soviet takeover
The Bolshevik Red Army in Tbilisi on 25 February 1921. Saint David's church on the Holy Mountain is visible in the distance.
Georgian Civil War and the War in Abkhazia in August–October 1993
The Rose Revolution, 2003
US Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice holding a joint press conference with Georgian president Mikheil Saakashvili during the Russo-Georgian war
Salome Zourabichvili, the first woman elected as president of Georgia
Presidential residence at the Orbeliani Palace in Tbilisi
Pro-NATO poster in Tbilisi
President of Georgia Salome Zourabichvili, President of Moldova Maia Sandu, President of Ukraine Volodymyr Zelensky and President of the European Council Charles Michel during the 2021 Batumi International Conference. In 2014, the EU signed Association Agreements with all the three states.
Georgian built Didgori-2 during the military parade in 2011
A Ford Taurus Police Interceptor operated by the Georgian Patrol Police.
Map of Georgia highlighting the disputed territories of Abkhazia and Tskhinvali Region (South Ossetia), both of which are outside the control of the central government of Georgia
Köppen climate classification map of Georgia
Mount Kazbek in eastern Georgia
Svaneti region of Georgia
View of the cave city of Vardzia and the valley of the Kura River below
Georgia's diverse climate creates varied landscapes, like these flat marshlands in the country's west
Southwest Georgia has a subtropical climate, with frequent rain and thick green vegetation
Georgian Shepherd Dog
GDP per capita development since 1973
A proportional representation of Georgia's exports in 2019
One of several plants operated by HeidelbergCement in Georgia
Wine-making is a traditional component of the Georgian economy.
The most visited ski resort of Georgia, Gudauri
The Georgian Railways represent a vital artery linking the Black Sea and Caspian Sea – the shortest route between Europe and Central Asia.
Port of Batumi
Ethno-linguistic groups in the Caucasus region
Tbilisi State University, Corpus I
Illuminated manuscript from medieval Georgia, showing a scene from nativity
Old Tbilisi – Architecture in Georgia is in many ways a fusion of European and Asian.
Rather than serving food in courses, traditional supras often present all that a host has to offer
Château Mukhrani, one of the centres of Georgia's viticulture in the 19th century, has recently been restored to produce its eponymous wine.
Dinamo Tbilisi, winner of 1981 European Cup Winners' Cup on stamp of Georgia, 2002
Château Mukhrani, one of the centres of Georgia's viticulture in the 19th century, has recently been restored to produce its eponymous wine.

In Greco-Roman geography, Colchis was an exonym for the Georgian polity of Egrisi (ეგრისი) located on the coast of the Black Sea, centered in present-day western Georgia.

- Colchis

During the classical era, several independent kingdoms became established in what is now Georgia, such as Colchis and Iberia.

- Georgia (country)

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Satellite image of the Caucasus Mountains

Caucasus Mountains

Mountain range at the intersection of Asia and Europe.

Mountain range at the intersection of Asia and Europe.

Satellite image of the Caucasus Mountains
Aishkho Pass, Caucasus Nature Reserve
Khodz river headwaters, Western Caucasus
Mount Elbrus viewed from the south in Kabardino-Balkaria
Komito Mountain in Chechnya
Caucasus Mountains in Svaneti, Georgia
Chaukhi mountain in Khevi, Georgia
A gorge in Dagestan, Russia
Twin-peaked Ushba in Georgia
Mount Shkhara in Georgia
Mount Ararat in Turkey, as viewed from Yerevan, Armenia
Asbestnaya Mount and Acheshbok Mount, Russia
Bolshoy Tkhach Park, Russia

The Greater and Lesser Caucasus ranges are connected by the Likhi Range, and to the west and east of the Likhi Range lie the Colchis Plain and the Kur-Araz Lowland.

The Javakheti Volcanic Plateau in Georgia and the surrounding volcanic ranges which extend well into central Armenia are some of the youngest features of the region.

Adjara

Logo of the Cabinet of Ministers.
Government building in Batumi.
Black Sea coast near the resort of Kvariati.
Batumi in the 1900s.

Adjara (აჭარა Ach’ara ) or Achara, officially known as the Autonomous Republic of Adjara (აჭარის ავტონომიური რესპუბლიკა.Ач'арис автономиури республика,Аджа́рская Автоно́мная Респу́блика) is a political-administrative region of Georgia.

Adjara has been part of Colchis and Caucasian Iberia since ancient times.

The location of the Black Sea

Black Sea

Marginal mediterranean sea of the Atlantic Ocean lying between Europe and Asia, east of the Balkans, south of the East European Plain, west of the Caucasus, and north of Anatolia.

Marginal mediterranean sea of the Atlantic Ocean lying between Europe and Asia, east of the Balkans, south of the East European Plain, west of the Caucasus, and north of Anatolia.

The location of the Black Sea
The estuary of the Veleka in the Black Sea. Longshore drift has deposited sediment along the shoreline which has led to the formation of a spit. Sinemorets, Bulgaria
Black Sea coast of western Georgia, with the skyline of Batumi on the horizon
Swallow's Nest in Crimea
Coastline of Samsun in Turkey
A sanatorium in Sochi, Russia
Coast of the Black Sea at Ordu
Kapchik Cape in Crimea
The Black Sea near Constanța, Romania
Ice on the Gulf of Odessa
The bay of Sudak, Crimea
The Yavuz Sultan Selim Bridge in Istanbul, Turkey, crosses the Bosporus strait near its entrance to the Black Sea. Connecting Europe and Asia, it is one of the tallest suspension bridges in the world.
This SeaWiFS view reveals the colorful interplay of currents on the sea's surface.
Black Sea coast in Ordu, Turkey
The port of Poti, Georgia
Phytoplankton blooms and plumes of sediment form the bright blue swirls that ring the Black Sea in this 2004 image.
The Bosporus, taken from the International Space Station
Map of the Dardanelles
A 16th-century map of the Black Sea by Diogo Homem
Greek colonies (8th–3rd century BCE) of the Black Sea (Euxine, or "hospitable" sea)
Ivan Aivazovsky. Black Sea Fleet in the Bay of Theodosia, just before the Crimean War
Yalta, Crimea
Amasra, Turkey, is located on a small island in the Black Sea.
Black Sea beach in Zatoka, Ukraine
Soviet frigate Bezzavetny (right) bumping the USS Yorktown during the 1988 Black Sea bumping incident
Ukrainian Navy artillery boat U170 in the Bay of Sevastopol
Jellyfish
Actinia
Actinia
Goby
Stingray
Goat fish
Hermit crab, Diogenes pugilator
Blue sponge
Spiny dogfish
Seahorse
Black Sea common dolphins with a kite-surfer off Sochi

The southern edge around Turkey and the eastern edge around Georgia, however, are typified by a narrow shelf that rarely exceeds 20 km in width and a steep apron that is typically 1:40 gradient with numerous submarine canyons and channel extensions.

The land at the eastern end of the Black Sea, Colchis (in present-day Georgia), marked for the ancient Greeks the edge of the known world.

The Georgian kings, queens consort and the Catholicos-Patriarch depicted on a Byzantine-influenced fresco wearing Byzantine dress at the Gelati Monastery, UNESCO's World Heritage Site landmark.

Georgians

The Georgian kings, queens consort and the Catholicos-Patriarch depicted on a Byzantine-influenced fresco wearing Byzantine dress at the Gelati Monastery, UNESCO's World Heritage Site landmark.
Georgian peasant in Mestia, c. 1888
Armour of King Alexander III of Imereti with golden plates.
The Bagrati Cathedral, The Cathedral of the Dormition, built during the reign of King Bagrat III, one of Georgia's most significant medieval religious buildings returned to its original state in 2012.
Georgians having a feast at Supra and Tamada making a toast. Painting by Niko Pirosmani.

The Georgians, or Kartvelians (ქართველები, ), are a nation and indigenous Caucasian ethnic group native to Georgia and the South Caucasus.

Georgians arose from Colchian and Iberian civilizations of classical antiquity; Colchis was interconnected with the Hellenic world, whereas Iberia was influenced by the Achaemenid Empire until Alexander the Great conquered it.

Rioni

Herodotus considered the Rioni river as a boundary between Europe and Asia

The Rioni (რიონი, Rioni;, Phᾶsis) is the main river of western Georgia.

The city of Kutaisi, once the ancient city of Colchis, lies on its banks.

Guria

Guria in Georgia
Relief map of Guria
Subdivision of Guria
Flag of the Principality of Guria
Historical Guria in modern international borders of Georgia
A Gurian man.

Guria (გურია) is a region (mkhare) in Georgia, in the western part of the country, bordered by the eastern end of the Black Sea.

The territory that is now Guria was part of the kingdom of Colchis, best known in the West for the tale of the Golden Fleece.

Batumi

Detail from a map of Antonio Zatta, 1784, depicting Georgian principality of Guria and its major town Batumi.
Port of Batumi in 1881
British troops holding a military parade in Batumi, Georgia 1920
As Georgia's Black Sea coast continues to develop, high-rises are being built amongst Batumi's traditionally classical cityscapes.
Coast of Batumi as seen from a nearby cliff
Batumi at night
Street in Batumi
Batumi Neptun Square
Batumi boulevard and beach
Radisson Blu Hotel, Batumi
Batumi University Fountain
Panorama view of Batumi Europe Square and Medea Statue
Panorama view of Iveria Beach, Batumi Boulevard and Batumi Mirade Park
Georgian Orthodox Cathedral of the Mother of God
The seaport of Batumi with the city in the background.

Batumi (ბათუმი ) is the second largest city of Georgia and the capital of the Autonomous Republic of Adjara, located on the coast of the Black Sea in Georgia's southwest.

Batumi is located on the site of the ancient Greek colony in Colchis called "Bathus" or "Bathys", derived from (, bathus limen; or βαθύς λιμήν, bathys limēn; lit. the 'deep harbour').

Jason on an antique fresco from Pompeii

Jason

Ancient Greek mythological hero and leader of the Argonauts, whose quest for the Golden Fleece featured in Greek literature.

Ancient Greek mythological hero and leader of the Argonauts, whose quest for the Golden Fleece featured in Greek literature.

Jason on an antique fresco from Pompeii
Pelias, king of Iolcos, stops on the steps of a temple as he recognises young Jason by his missing sandal; Roman fresco from Pompeii, 20-25 AD.
Jason bringing Pelias the Golden Fleece, Apulian red-figure calyx krater, ca. 340 BC–330 BC, Louvre
Jason and Medea - as depicted by John William Waterhouse, 1907.
Jason and the Snake
Jason portrayed by Todd Armstrong in Jason and the Argonauts (1963).

Jason arrived in Colchis (modern Black Sea coast of Georgia) to claim the fleece as his own.

Kutaisi

Kutaisi in 1870
Kutaisi in 1885
Bagrati Cathedral, originally built in the Middle Ages and recently repaired from damages suffered through centuries
Gelati Monastery, a UNESCO World Heritage Site on the outskirts of Kutaisi
Kutaisi State Historical Museum
Drama Theatre
Downtown Kutaisi
View of Kutaisi
Map of Kutaisi
Rustaveli bridge at night
TBC Bank in Kutaisi
Kutaisi International Airport
Colchis Fountain in main square
New Georgian Parliament Building in Kutaisi
Kutaisi Walk in Newport
A street in central Kutaisi
Church of Annunciation
Court of Appeals
Kutaisi Public School
Local synagogue built in 1886
Kutaisi State Opera

Kutaisi (, ქუთაისი ) is one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the world and the third-most populous city in Georgia, traditionally, second in importance, after the capital city of Tbilisi.

Historically one of the major cities of Georgia, it served as political center of Colchis in the Middle Ages as capital of the Kingdom of Abkhazia and Kingdom of Georgia and later as the capital of the Kingdom of Imereti.

Jason returns with the Golden Fleece, shown on an Apulian red-figure calyx krater, c. 340–330 BC

Golden Fleece

Jason returns with the Golden Fleece, shown on an Apulian red-figure calyx krater, c. 340–330 BC
A sluice box used in placer mining.
The Douris cup, depicting Jason being regurgitated by the dragon protecting the fleece

In Greek mythology, the Golden Fleece (Χρυσόμαλλον δέρας, Chrysómallon déras) is the fleece of the golden-woolled, winged ram, Chrysomallos, that rescued Phrixus and brought him to Colchis, where Phrixus then sacrificed it to Zeus.

Nowadays, the heraldic variations of the Golden Fleece are featured frequently in the Republic of Georgia, especially for Coats of Arms and Flags associated with Western Georgian (Historical Colchis) municipalities and cities, including the Coats of Arms of City of Kutaisi, the ancient capital city of Colchis.