Colcombe Castle

ColcombeColcombe House
Colcombe Castle was a now lost castle or fortified house situated about a half mile north of the village of Colyton in East Devon.wikipedia
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Thomas de Courtenay, 5th/13th Earl of Devon

Thomas de Courtenay, 5th Earl of DevonThomas Courtenay, 13th Earl of DevonThomas de Courtenay, 13th Earl of Devon
It was used as his seat by Thomas de Courtenay, 5th Earl of Devon (d.
His seat was at Colcombe Castle near Colyton, and later at the principal historic family seat of Tiverton Castle, after his mother's death.

Colyton, Devon

ColytonYardbury
Colcombe Castle was a now lost castle or fortified house situated about a half mile north of the village of Colyton in East Devon.
Situated 0.5 mile to the north of the town was Colcombe Castle, now demolished, a former seat of the Courtenay family, Earls of Devon.

Clyst Heath

Battle of Clyst HeathClystFirst Battle of Clyst Heath
Its position near to Shute, the seat of William Bonville, 1st Baron Bonville (1392–1461), the arch-enemy of the 5th Earl, led to some serious territorial battles between the two families, culminating in the Battle of Clyst Heath of 1455.
The Courtenay family of Tiverton Castle and Colcombe Castle, who had been earls of Devon since 1335, were challenged in the 15th century by the rise of the Bonville family of Shute.

Henry Courtenay, 1st Marquess of Exeter

Marquess of ExeterHenry CourtenayHenry Courtenay, 1st Marquess of Exeter, 2nd Earl of Devon
The Earl built a mansion house at Colcombe, near Colyton, which was later rebuilt in a more grand state by Henry Courtenay, but upon his death, the mansion was left in ruins for a time.
1498 – 9 December 1538), KG, PC, feudal baron of Okehampton, feudal baron of Plympton, of Tiverton Castle, Okehampton Castle and Colcombe Castle all in Devon, was a grandson of King Edward IV, nephew of the queen consort, Elizabeth of York and a first cousin of King Henry VIII.

Tiverton Castle

It was a seat of the Courtenay family, Earls of Devon, whose principal seat was Tiverton Castle, about 22 miles to the NW.
The Courtenays also held from the 13th-century Okehampton Castle, their original seat in England, and later built Colcombe Castle, both in Devon.

Hugh de Courtenay, 1st/9th Earl of Devon

Hugh de CourtenayHugh de Courtenay, 9th Earl of DevonHugh de Courtenay, 1st Earl of Devon
Alice Bassett, the other daughter, was married to Sir Thomas Sanford, and secondly to Sir John Bissett, whose part was afterwards sold unto Hugh de Courtenay, 1st Earl of Devon, so that the whole manors of Colyton and Whitford came to be the possessions of the Earls of Devon.
He built the original Colcombe Castle situated near the village of Colyton, Devon.

William Pole (antiquary)

PoleWilliam PolePole, Sir William
His son Sir William Pole (1561–1635), the antiquary, purchased the remaining shares from the heirs of the Courtenays, and rebuilt the house, as he recorded after 1618 in his "Collections towards a History of Devon": A goodly building was here intended by the last erles but altogether unfinished, and nowe the whole being reduced from all ye co-heires unto my possession, I have newe built the howse and made it the place of my residinge". Sir William resided most of his younger life at Shute, until 1618, during which time he let his son John, later the 1st Pole baronet, live in the former building at Colcombe, as is evidenced by the record of the birth of John's second son Courtenay Pole, which described his father as "John Pole of Colcombe". In 1618 Sir William Pole exchanged residences with his son John, to whom he let Shute, and himself moved to Colcombe, which he then set about rebuilding and where he died in 1635.
Sir William Pole (1561–1635) of Colcombe House in the parish of Colyton, of Southcote in the parish of Talaton and formerly of Shute House in the parish of Shute (adjoining Colcombe), both in Devon, was an English country gentleman and landowner, a colonial investor, Member of Parliament and, most notably, a historian and antiquarian of the County of Devon.

William Bonville, 1st Baron Bonville

William BonvilleSir William BonvilleLord Bonville
Its position near to Shute, the seat of William Bonville, 1st Baron Bonville (1392–1461), the arch-enemy of the 5th Earl, led to some serious territorial battles between the two families, culminating in the Battle of Clyst Heath of 1455.
This particular phase of the feud was suspended by the holding of a loveday (dies amoris) between Bonville and Courtenay at Colcombe in 1451.

Earl of Devon

Earls of DevonEarl of Devon (1553)Earl of Devon (1141)
It was a seat of the Courtenay family, Earls of Devon, whose principal seat was Tiverton Castle, about 22 miles to the NW.
The principal seat of the Earls of Devon until the expiry of the senior line in 1556 was Tiverton Castle in Devon, and as a subsidiary seat Colcombe Castle, Devon, both of which are now largely demolished.

Old Shute House

ShuteShute HouseShute Barton
1588), who had purchased Shute House in 1560.
Courtenay had as his secondary seat Colcombe Castle, only a few miles from Shute, and the proximity of their two estates served to fuel their enmity.

Sir John de la Pole, 6th Baronet

Sir John-William de la PoleSir John de la PoleSir John William de la Pole, 6th Baronet
Colcombe appears to have passed out of the Pole family after the time of the 1st baronet, but was repurchased by Sir John de la Pole, 6th Baronet (1757–1799), the builder of New Shute House, possibly from Sir George Yonge of Colyton, from whom he had acquired several large properties in 1790.
In 1791 he published, under the title Collections Towards a Description of the County of Devon, the researches on the history and genealogy of Devonshire made by his ancestor the antiquary Sir William Pole (d.1635), which he did not publish in his lifetime and which were enlarged by his son Sir John Pole, 1st Baronet, but which were partly destroyed during the Civil War at Colcombe Castle.

Walter Erle (died 1581)

Walter ErleWalter EarleWalter I Erle
Following the downfall of the Courtenays and the Dissolution of the Monasteries the Chantry and its lands were purchased from the Crown by Walter Erle (died 1581), a royal courtier who in 1546 had been granted by Queen Catherine Parr a 40 year lease of Colcombe, having already in 1543 been granted the office of "Bailiff and Hayward of the manor and hundred of Colyton and Keeper of the park and mansion of Colcombe.
Walter Erle (c.1515/20-1581) (alias Erley, Erell, etc. ) of Colcombe in the parish of Colyton, of Bindon in the parish of Axmouth, both in Devon, and of Charborough in Dorset, England, was a courtier and servant of the Royal Household to two of the wives of King Henry VIII, namely Catherine Howard (beheaded 1542) and Catherine Parr (survived, died 1548), and successively to his son King Edward VI (1547-1553) and two daughters, Queen Mary I (1553-1558) and Queen Elizabeth I (1558-1603) during their successive reigns.

William Henry Hamilton Rogers

Rogers, William Henry HamiltonHamilton Rogers, William HenryHamilton Rogers, W.H.
*Rogers, W.H. Hamilton, Memorials of the West, Historical and Descriptive, Collected on the Borderland of Somerset, Dorset and Devon, Exeter, 1888, pp.

Fortified house

Fortifiedfortified housesfortified residence
Colcombe Castle was a now lost castle or fortified house situated about a half mile north of the village of Colyton in East Devon.

Devon

DevonshireDevon, EnglandCounty of Devon
Colcombe Castle was a now lost castle or fortified house situated about a half mile north of the village of Colyton in East Devon.

House of Courtenay

CourtenayCourtenay familyCourtenays
It was a seat of the Courtenay family, Earls of Devon, whose principal seat was Tiverton Castle, about 22 miles to the NW.

Colyford

Colyford, DevonColyford, East Devon
1630, described the descent of the manor of Colyford thus:

Norman conquest of England

Norman ConquestConquestNorman invasion
The manor at the Norman Conquest was parcel of the king's demesne, which King William the Conqueror gave to Robert de Mount Chardon; but was released again by King Henry II of England, with the manor of Whitford, which was bestowed on Sir Alan Dunstanville, whose son Sir Walter Dunstanville gave it in marriage (by the consent of King John) unto Sir Thomas Bassett, his nephew, younger son of the Lord Bassett by Alice Dunstanville, sister of the said Walter.

Demesne

Bartonfeudal domaindesmesne
The manor at the Norman Conquest was parcel of the king's demesne, which King William the Conqueror gave to Robert de Mount Chardon; but was released again by King Henry II of England, with the manor of Whitford, which was bestowed on Sir Alan Dunstanville, whose son Sir Walter Dunstanville gave it in marriage (by the consent of King John) unto Sir Thomas Bassett, his nephew, younger son of the Lord Bassett by Alice Dunstanville, sister of the said Walter.

William the Conqueror

William IWilliam I of EnglandWilliam of Normandy
The manor at the Norman Conquest was parcel of the king's demesne, which King William the Conqueror gave to Robert de Mount Chardon; but was released again by King Henry II of England, with the manor of Whitford, which was bestowed on Sir Alan Dunstanville, whose son Sir Walter Dunstanville gave it in marriage (by the consent of King John) unto Sir Thomas Bassett, his nephew, younger son of the Lord Bassett by Alice Dunstanville, sister of the said Walter.

Henry II of England

Henry IIKing Henry IIHenry Plantagenet
The manor at the Norman Conquest was parcel of the king's demesne, which King William the Conqueror gave to Robert de Mount Chardon; but was released again by King Henry II of England, with the manor of Whitford, which was bestowed on Sir Alan Dunstanville, whose son Sir Walter Dunstanville gave it in marriage (by the consent of King John) unto Sir Thomas Bassett, his nephew, younger son of the Lord Bassett by Alice Dunstanville, sister of the said Walter.

Whitford, Devon

Whitford
The manor at the Norman Conquest was parcel of the king's demesne, which King William the Conqueror gave to Robert de Mount Chardon; but was released again by King Henry II of England, with the manor of Whitford, which was bestowed on Sir Alan Dunstanville, whose son Sir Walter Dunstanville gave it in marriage (by the consent of King John) unto Sir Thomas Bassett, his nephew, younger son of the Lord Bassett by Alice Dunstanville, sister of the said Walter.

John, King of England

King JohnJohnJohn of England
The manor at the Norman Conquest was parcel of the king's demesne, which King William the Conqueror gave to Robert de Mount Chardon; but was released again by King Henry II of England, with the manor of Whitford, which was bestowed on Sir Alan Dunstanville, whose son Sir Walter Dunstanville gave it in marriage (by the consent of King John) unto Sir Thomas Bassett, his nephew, younger son of the Lord Bassett by Alice Dunstanville, sister of the said Walter.

Edward Courtenay, 1st Earl of Devon

Edward CourtenayEdwardEdward Courtenay, 1st Earl of Devon (1553 creation)
It was later restored unto his son, Edward Courtenay, the last earl of this family, by Queen Mary I of England, and upon his death, was left to descend to the heirs general, who sold this manor and house.