Cole Porter

PorterColeC. PorterMedley of songs by Cole Porter Cole PorterCole Albert Porter
Cole Albert Porter (June 9, 1891 – October 15, 1964) was an American composer and songwriter.wikipedia
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Tony Award for Best Musical

Best MusicalTony AwardOutstanding Musical
It won the first Tony Award for Best Musical.

Kiss Me, Kate

Kiss Me KateBroadway musical of the same nameWere Thine That Special Face
His shows of the early 1940s did not contain the lasting hits of his best work of the 1920s and '30s, but in 1948 he made a triumphant comeback with his most successful musical, Kiss Me, Kate.
Kiss Me, Kate is a musical written by Bella and Samuel Spewack with music and lyrics by Cole Porter.

Anything Goes

Anything Goes (Tuacahn High School)1934 playAnything Goes!
Porter's other musicals include Fifty Million Frenchmen, DuBarry Was a Lady, Anything Goes, Can-Can and Silk Stockings.
Anything Goes is a 1934 musical with music and lyrics by Cole Porter.

Du Barry Was a Lady

DuBarry Was a Ladystage musical of the same name
Porter's other musicals include Fifty Million Frenchmen, DuBarry Was a Lady, Anything Goes, Can-Can and Silk Stockings.
Du Barry Was a Lady is a Broadway musical, with music and lyrics by Cole Porter, and the book by Herbert Fields and Buddy DeSylva.

Can-Can (musical)

Can-CanCan-Can'' (musical)musical play
Porter's other musicals include Fifty Million Frenchmen, DuBarry Was a Lady, Anything Goes, Can-Can and Silk Stockings.
Can-Can is a musical with music and lyrics by Cole Porter, and a book by Abe Burrows.

Night and Day (song)

Night and DayNight & DayNight and Day" (song)
His numerous hit songs include "Night and Day", "Begin the Beguine", "I Get a Kick Out of You", "Well, Did You Evah!", "I've Got You Under My Skin", "My Heart Belongs to Daddy" and "You're the Top".
"Night and Day" is a popular song by Cole Porter that was written for the 1932 musical Gay Divorce.

You're the Top

You’re the Top
His numerous hit songs include "Night and Day", "Begin the Beguine", "I Get a Kick Out of You", "Well, Did You Evah!", "I've Got You Under My Skin", "My Heart Belongs to Daddy" and "You're the Top".
"You're the Top" is a Cole Porter song from the 1934 musical Anything Goes.

I Get a Kick Out of You

Eu Só Me Ligo Em Você (I Get a Kick Out Of You)I Get No Kick from Champagne
His numerous hit songs include "Night and Day", "Begin the Beguine", "I Get a Kick Out of You", "Well, Did You Evah!", "I've Got You Under My Skin", "My Heart Belongs to Daddy" and "You're the Top".
"I Get a Kick Out of You" is a song by Cole Porter, which was first sung in the 1934 Broadway musical Anything Goes, and then in the 1936 film version.

My Heart Belongs to Daddy

His numerous hit songs include "Night and Day", "Begin the Beguine", "I Get a Kick Out of You", "Well, Did You Evah!", "I've Got You Under My Skin", "My Heart Belongs to Daddy" and "You're the Top".
"My Heart Belongs to Daddy" is a song written by Cole Porter, for the 1938 musical Leave It to Me! which premiered on November 9, 1938.

Fifty Million Frenchmen

Paree, What Did You Do To Me
Porter's other musicals include Fifty Million Frenchmen, DuBarry Was a Lady, Anything Goes, Can-Can and Silk Stockings.
Fifty Million Frenchmen is a musical comedy with a book by Herbert Fields and music and lyrics by Cole Porter.

Well, Did You Evah!

Well Did You Evah!song
His numerous hit songs include "Night and Day", "Begin the Beguine", "I Get a Kick Out of You", "Well, Did You Evah!", "I've Got You Under My Skin", "My Heart Belongs to Daddy" and "You're the Top".
"Well, Did You Evah!" is a song written by Cole Porter for his 1939 musical DuBarry Was a Lady, where it was introduced by Betty Grable and Charles Walters.

Begin the Beguine

Begin The Beguine (Volver A Empezar)Beguine
His numerous hit songs include "Night and Day", "Begin the Beguine", "I Get a Kick Out of You", "Well, Did You Evah!", "I've Got You Under My Skin", "My Heart Belongs to Daddy" and "You're the Top".
"Begin the Beguine" is a popular song written by Cole Porter.

You'd Be So Easy to Love

Easy to Love(You'd Be So) Easy to Love
He also composed scores for films from the 1930s to the 1950s, including Born to Dance (1936), which featured the song "You'd Be So Easy to Love"; Rosalie (1937), which featured "In the Still of the Night"; High Society (1956), which included "True Love"; and Les Girls (1957).
"(You'd Be So) Easy to Love" is a popular song written by Cole Porter for William Gaxton to sing in the 1934 Broadway show Anything Goes.

True Love (Cole Porter song)

True LoveTrue Love (song)True Love" (Cole Porter song)
He also composed scores for films from the 1930s to the 1950s, including Born to Dance (1936), which featured the song "You'd Be So Easy to Love"; Rosalie (1937), which featured "In the Still of the Night"; High Society (1956), which included "True Love"; and Les Girls (1957).
"True Love" is a popular song written by Cole Porter and was published in 1956.

In the Still of the Night (Cole Porter song)

In the Still of the NightIn the Still of the Night" (Cole Porter song)
He also composed scores for films from the 1930s to the 1950s, including Born to Dance (1936), which featured the song "You'd Be So Easy to Love"; Rosalie (1937), which featured "In the Still of the Night"; High Society (1956), which included "True Love"; and Les Girls (1957).
"In the Still of the Night" is a popular song written by Cole Porter for the MGM film Rosalie sung by Nelson Eddy and published in 1937.

Silk Stockings

stage musical of the same name1957Porter's musical
Porter's other musicals include Fifty Million Frenchmen, DuBarry Was a Lady, Anything Goes, Can-Can and Silk Stockings.
Silk Stockings is a musical with a book by George S. Kaufman, Leueen MacGrath, and Abe Burrows and music and lyrics by Cole Porter.

Rosalie (film)

Rosaliea musical filmfilm
He also composed scores for films from the 1930s to the 1950s, including Born to Dance (1936), which featured the song "You'd Be So Easy to Love"; Rosalie (1937), which featured "In the Still of the Night"; High Society (1956), which included "True Love"; and Les Girls (1957).
The film follows the story of the musical, but replaces most of the Broadway score with new songs by Cole Porter.

Born to Dance

He also composed scores for films from the 1930s to the 1950s, including Born to Dance (1936), which featured the song "You'd Be So Easy to Love"; Rosalie (1937), which featured "In the Still of the Night"; High Society (1956), which included "True Love"; and Les Girls (1957).
The score was composed by Cole Porter.

The Whiffenpoofs

WhiffenpoofsThe Whiffenpoof SongYale Whiffenpoofs
He was an early member of the Whiffenpoofs a cappella singing group and participated in several other music clubs; in his senior year, he was elected president of the Yale Glee Club and was its principal soloist.
Former members include Cole Porter.

High Society (1956 film)

High Society19561956 film
He also composed scores for films from the 1930s to the 1950s, including Born to Dance (1936), which featured the song "You'd Be So Easy to Love"; Rosalie (1937), which featured "In the Still of the Night"; High Society (1956), which included "True Love"; and Les Girls (1957).
The film was produced by Sol C. Siegel for Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, and shot in VistaVision and Technicolor, with music and lyrics by Cole Porter.

See America First

The quick success was immediately followed by failure: his first Broadway production, in 1916, See America First, a "patriotic comic opera" modeled on Gilbert and Sullivan, with a book by T. Lawrason Riggs, was a flop, closing after two weeks.
See America First is a comic opera with a book by T. Lawrason Riggs and music and lyrics by Cole Porter.

Yale Dramatic Association

DramatYale DramatYale Dramatic Club
He also wrote musical comedy scores for his fraternity, the Yale Dramatic Association, and as a student at Harvard – Cora (1911), And the Villain Still Pursued Her (1912), The Pot of Gold (1912), The Kaleidoscope (1913) and Paranoia (1914) – which helped prepare him for a career as a Broadway and Hollywood composer and lyricist.
Cole Porter was undoubtedly the best-known of the Dramat's early Twentieth-Century figures.

Linda Lee Thomas

LindaLinda PorterLinda Lee Porter
In 1918, he met Linda Lee Thomas, a rich, Louisville, Kentucky-born divorcée eight years his senior.
Linda Lee Thomas (November 17, 1883 – May 20, 1954) was an American socialite and the wife of musical theatre composer Cole Porter.

Musical theatre

musicalmusicalsmusical comedy
Classically trained, he was drawn to musical theatre.
Despite forgettable stories, these musicals featured stars such as Marilyn Miller and Fred Astaire and produced dozens of enduring popular songs by Kern, George and Ira Gershwin, Irving Berlin, Cole Porter and Rodgers and Hart.

Les Girls

He also composed scores for films from the 1930s to the 1950s, including Born to Dance (1936), which featured the song "You'd Be So Easy to Love"; Rosalie (1937), which featured "In the Still of the Night"; High Society (1956), which included "True Love"; and Les Girls (1957).
The music and lyrics were by Cole Porter.