Portrait by Harris & Ewing, 1919
European diplomatic alignments shortly before the World War I. Germany and the Ottoman Empire allied after the outbreak of war.
Anachronous world map showing member states of the League during its 26-year history.
Wilson, c. undefined mid-1870s
In 1938, France betrayed Czechoslovakia and signed the Munich Agreement with Nazi Germany, effectively dishonoring the French-Czechoslovak alliance.
The 1864 Geneva Convention, one of the earliest formulations of international law
Ellen Wilson in 1912
The leaders of some of the SEATO nations in Manila, hosted by Philippine President Ferdinand Marcos on 24 October 1966
The League to Enforce Peace published this full-page promotion in The New York Times on Christmas Day 1918. It resolved that the League "should ensure peace by eliminating causes of dissension, by deciding controversies by peaceable means, and by uniting the potential force of all the members as a standing menace against any nation that seeks to upset the peace of the world".
Wilson in 1902
Member states of NATO
On his December 1918 trip to Europe, Woodrow Wilson gave speeches that "reaffirmed that the making of peace and the creation of a League of Nations must be accomplished as one single objective".
Prospect House, Wilson's home on Princeton's campus
In 1924, the headquarters of the League was named "Palais Wilson", after Woodrow Wilson, who was credited as the "Founder of the League of Nations"
Governor Wilson, 1911
League of Nations Organisation chart
Results of the 1910 gubernatorial election in New Jersey. Wilson won the counties in blue.
Palace of Nations, Geneva, the League's headquarters from 1936 until its dissolution in 1946
1912 electoral vote map
Child labour in a coal mine, United States, c. 1912
Woodrow Wilson and his cabinet (1918)
Child labour in Kamerun in 1919
Wilson giving his first State of the Union address, the first such address since 1801
A sample Nansen passport
Map of Federal Reserve Districts–black circles, Federal Reserve Banks–black squares, District branches–red circles and Washington HQ–star/black circle
A map of the world in 1920–45, which shows the League of Nations members during its history
In a 1913 cartoon, Wilson primes the economic pump with tariff, currency and antitrust laws
Chinese delegate addresses the League of Nations concerning the Manchurian Crisis in 1932.
Official presidential portrait of Woodrow Wilson (1913)
Emperor Haile Selassie I going into exile in Bath, England via Jerusalem
Uncle Sam entering Mexico in 1916 to punish Pancho Villa. Uncle Sam says "I've had about enough of this."
The Gap in the Bridge; the sign reads "This League of Nations Bridge was designed by the President of the U.S.A."
Cartoon from Punch magazine, 10 December 1920, satirising the gap left by the US not joining the League.
Wilson and "Jingo", the American War Dog. The editorial cartoon ridicules jingoes baying for war.
World map showing member states of the League of Nations (in green and red) on 18 April 1946, when the League of Nations ceased to exist.
The Wilson family
League of Nations archives, Geneva.
Wilson accepts the Democratic Party nomination, 1916
1916 electoral vote map
Map of the great powers and their empires in 1914
Liberty Loan drive in front of City Hall, New Orleans. On City Hall is a banner reading "Food will win the war—don't waste it".
Women workers in ordnance shops, Pennsylvania, 1918
The "Big Four" at the Paris Peace Conference in 1919, following the end of World War I. Wilson is standing next to Georges Clemenceau at right.
Several new European states were established at the Paris Peace Conference
Wilson returning from the Versailles Peace Conference, 1919.
June 3, 1919, Newspapers of the 1919 bombings
Republican nominee Warren G. Harding defeated Democratic nominee James Cox in the 1920 election
The final resting place of Woodrow Wilson at the Washington National Cathedral
Quotation from Woodrow Wilson's History of the American People as reproduced in the film The Birth of a Nation.
World War I draft card, the lower left corner to be removed by men of African background to help keep the military segregated
Political cartoon published in New York Evening Mail about the East St. Louis riots of 1917. Original caption reads "Mr. President, why not make America safe for democracy?"
1934 $100,000 gold certificate depicting Wilson.
Stamps memorializing Wilson
Woodrow Wilson Monument in Prague

He was the leading architect of the League of Nations, and his progressive stance on foreign policy came to be known as Wilsonianism.

- Woodrow Wilson

They included preventing wars through collective security and disarmament and settling international disputes through negotiation and arbitration.

- League of Nations

In 1919 U.S. president Woodrow Wilson won the Nobel Peace Prize for his role as the leading architect of the League.

- League of Nations

The concept of "collective security" was pioneered by Baháʼu'lláh, Michael Joseph Savage, Martin Wight, Immanuel Kant, and Woodrow Wilson and was deemed to apply interests in security in a broad manner to "avoid grouping powers into opposing camps, and refusing to draw dividing lines that would leave anyone out."

- Collective security

The term "collective security" has also been cited as a principle of the United Nations and earlier the League of Nations.

- Collective security

Article X of the League Covenant, which sought to create a system of collective security by requiring League members to protect one another against external aggression, seemed to force the U.S. to join in any war the League decided upon.

- Woodrow Wilson

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