College of Arms

Royal LicenceCollege of HeraldsThe College of ArmsHerald's CollegeKings of ArmsHeraldsby Royal LicenceChester of Herald of the Royal College of ArmsCollege-of-HeraldsEngland
The College of Arms, sometimes referred to as the College of Heralds, is a royal corporation consisting of professional officers of arms, with jurisdiction over England, Wales, Northern Ireland and some Commonwealth realms.wikipedia
982 Related Articles

Pursuivant

pursuivant of armspursuivantsPursuivants of Arms
The College comprises thirteen officers or heralds: three Kings of Arms, six Heralds of Arms and four Pursuivants of Arms.
Most pursuivants are attached to official heraldic authorities, such as the College of Arms in London or the Court of the Lord Lyon in Edinburgh.

Court of the Lord Lyon

The Court of the Lord LyonLyon CourtCourt
Within the United Kingdom, there are two such authorities, the Court of the Lord Lyon in Scotland and the College for the rest of the United Kingdom.
Its equivalent in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland, in terms of awarding arms is the College of Arms, which is a royal corporation and not a court of law.

Earl Marshal

Lord MarshalMarshal of EnglandEarl Marshal of England
The entire corporation is overseen by the Earl Marshal, a hereditary office held by the Duke of Norfolk, currently Edward Fitzalan-Howard, 18th Duke of Norfolk. Soon after his accession to the throne he created Sir John Howard as Duke of Norfolk and Earl Marshal of England, who became the first Howard appointed to both positions.
He is also a leading officer of arms and oversees the College of Arms.

Heraldry

heraldicheraldistarms
The heralds are appointed by the British Sovereign and are delegated authority to act on behalf of the Crown in all matters of heraldry, the granting of new coats of arms, genealogical research and the recording of pedigrees.
In 1484, during the reign of Richard III, the various heralds employed by the crown were incorporated into the College of Arms, through which all new grants of arms would eventually be issued.

Royal Households of the United Kingdom

Royal HouseholdBritish Royal HouseholdPrivate Secretary to the Prince of Wales
Though a part of the Royal Household of the United Kingdom the College is self-financed, unsupported by any public funds.
The College of Arms has been a branch of the Royal Household since its incorporation in 1484 by King Richard III it was directly appointed by the Sovereign on the recommendation of Earl Marshal.

John Writhe

John Wrythe
This was because it was supposed that the house was granted personally to John Writhe the Garter King of Arms and not to the heralds as a corporation.
He was probably the son of William Writhe, who represented the borough of Cricklade in the Parliament of 1450–51, and is most remembered for being the first Garter King of Arms to preside over the College of Arms.

Roll of arms

armorialrolls of armsarmorials
King Richard III's interest in heraldry was indicated by his possession of two important rolls of arms.
Collins' Roll [Queen's College, Oxford, MS 158, pp. 366–402 (copy c.1640)] is a roll dating from 1296, containing 598 painted coats. It currently resides at the College of Arms in London.

Robert Cooke (officer of arms)

Robert CookeClarenceux Robert CookeCooke
The long reign saw the College distracted by the many quarrels between Garter William Dethick, Clarenceux Robert Cooke and York Herald Ralph Brooke about their rights and annulments.
In the College of Arms, he rose to the rank of Clarenceux King of Arms, serving in that capacity from 1567 until his death in 1592–3.

Duke of Norfolk

Dukes of NorfolkDukedom of NorfolkDuke of Norfolk (1483)
The entire corporation is overseen by the Earl Marshal, a hereditary office held by the Duke of Norfolk, currently Edward Fitzalan-Howard, 18th Duke of Norfolk. Soon after his accession to the throne he created Sir John Howard as Duke of Norfolk and Earl Marshal of England, who became the first Howard appointed to both positions.
As the Earl Marshal, the Duke of Norfolk is head of the College of Arms, through which he regulates all matters connected with armorial bearings and standards, in addition to controlling the arrangements for state functions.

Thomas Stanley, 1st Earl of Derby

Lord StanleyThomas StanleyThomas Stanley, 2nd Baron Stanley
The house was built by Thomas Stanley, 1st Earl of Derby, who married Lady Margaret Beaufort in 1482 and was created the 1st Earl of Derby in 1485.
His estates included what is now Tatton Park in Cheshire, Lathom House in Lancashire, and Derby House in the City of London, now the site of the College of Arms.

State funerals in the United Kingdom

state funeralstate funeralsceremonial funeral
The College of Arms also undertakes and consults on the planning of many ceremonial occasions such as coronations, state funerals, the annual Garter Service and the State Opening of Parliament.
One clear distinction, however, is that state funerals (like coronations and the State Opening of Parliament) are organized and overseen by the Earl Marshal and his officers the Heralds, who are prominently placed ahead of the coffin in the procession.

Pedigree chart

pedigreepedigreesbloodlines
The heralds are appointed by the British Sovereign and are delegated authority to act on behalf of the Crown in all matters of heraldry, the granting of new coats of arms, genealogical research and the recording of pedigrees.
In England and Wales pedigrees are officially recorded in the College of Arms, which has records going back to the Middle Ages, including pedigrees collected during roving inquiries by its heralds during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.

William Dethick

Sir William DethickGarter William DethickWilliam
The long reign saw the College distracted by the many quarrels between Garter William Dethick, Clarenceux Robert Cooke and York Herald Ralph Brooke about their rights and annulments.
Sir William Dethick (c. 1542–1612) was a long-serving officer of arms at the College of Arms in London.

Heraldic visitation

Heralds' Visitationsheraldic visitationsvisitation
It was also in this reign in 1530, that Henry VIII conferred on the College one of its most important duties for almost a century, the heraldic visitation.
Other ancient arms, many of which predated the establishment of the College of Arms, were confirmed.

Edward Fitzalan-Howard, 18th Duke of Norfolk

Duke of Norfolk18th Duke of Norfolkthe 18th Duke of Norfolk
The entire corporation is overseen by the Earl Marshal, a hereditary office held by the Duke of Norfolk, currently Edward Fitzalan-Howard, 18th Duke of Norfolk.
He is also, by virtue of this office, one of the hereditary judges of the Court of Chivalry and head of the College of Arms, responsible for heraldry in England and Wales as well as other parts of the Commonwealth of Nations.

Ralph Brooke

York Herald Ralph Brooke
The long reign saw the College distracted by the many quarrels between Garter William Dethick, Clarenceux Robert Cooke and York Herald Ralph Brooke about their rights and annulments.
He is known for his critiques of the work of other members of the College of Arms, most particularly in A Discoverie of Certaine Errours Published in Print in the Much Commended 'Britannia' 1594, which touched off a feud with its author, the revered antiquarian and herald William Camden.

Richard III of England

Richard IIIKing Richard IIIRichard, Duke of Gloucester
King Richard III's interest in heraldry was indicated by his possession of two important rolls of arms. Founded by royal charter in 1484 by King Richard III, the College is one of the few remaining official heraldic authorities in Europe.
Richard also founded the College of Arms.

City of London

CityLondonthe City
The College has had its home in the City of London since its foundation, and has been at its present location, on Queen Victoria Street, since 1555.
The coat of arms is "anciently recorded" at the College of Arms.

House of Howard

HowardHoward familyHowards
Soon after his accession to the throne he created Sir John Howard as Duke of Norfolk and Earl Marshal of England, who became the first Howard appointed to both positions.
A pedigree compiled and signed by Sir William Dugdale The Norroy King of Arms at the College of Arms dated 8 April 1665 however states that the Howard family are descended from the Howarth [sic Howard] family of Great Howarth Hall, Rochdale.

Algar Howard

Sir Algar HowardAlgar Henry Stafford HowardSir Algar Henry Stafford Howard
In 1939, at the beginning of the Second World War, the College's records were moved to Thornbury Castle in Gloucestershire, the home of Major Algar Howard (the Norroy King of Arms).
Sir Algar Henry Stafford Howard (7 August 1880 – 14 February 1970) was a long-serving officer of arms at the College of Arms in London.

Anthony Wagner

Sir Anthony WagnerSir Anthony Richard WagnerAnthony Richard Wagner
Sir Anthony Wagner wrote that "The officers of these departments, no doubt, in the overconfident way of their generation, esteemed the College an anachronistic and anomalous institution overdue for reform or abolition."
Sir Anthony Richard Wagner (6 September 1908 – 5 May 1995) was a long-serving Officer of Arms at the College of Arms in London.

Edward Walker (officer of arms)

Sir Edward WalkerEdward WalkerEdward Walker Esq.
Sir Edward Walker the Garter King of Arms (from 1645) was even appointed, with the permission of Parliament, to act as the King's chief secretary at the negotiations at Newport.
In 1635, Walker was made Blanch Lyon Pursuivant Extraordinary, in 1637 Rouge Croix Pursuivant of Arms in Ordinary, in 1638 Chester Herald of Arms in Ordinary, in 1644 Norroy King of Arms, and in 1645 Garter Principal King of Arms, so that within less than eight years of entering the College of Arms he had attained the highest post.

St Benet's, Paul's Wharf

Church of St Benet Paul's WharfSt Benet, Paul's WharfSt Benedict's, Paul's Wharf
In the year of the quincentenary of the incorporation of the College of Arms, the College held a special service of thanksgiving at St Benet Paul's Wharf (the College's official church since 1555) on 2 March 1984.
Since 1556, it has also been the official church of the College of Arms in which many officers of arms have been buried.

Heraldic authority

heraldic authoritiesheraldic bodyOffice of Heraldry
Founded by royal charter in 1484 by King Richard III, the College is one of the few remaining official heraldic authorities in Europe.
* College of Arms (1484- ), headed by the Garter Principal King of Arms, under the general jurisdiction of the Earl Marshal – grants personal, municipal, and corporate arms, also records pedigrees and genealogies.

Queen Victoria Street, London

Queen Victoria Street1 Queen Victoria Street, London
The College has had its home in the City of London since its foundation, and has been at its present location, on Queen Victoria Street, since 1555.
The College of Arms' headquarters at No. 130