Collegium (ancient Rome)

collegiumcollegiacollegecollegescollege (''collegium'')Roman Collegiacolleaguescollegial institutionscollegiicollegium pointificum
A collegium (plural collegia, "gathered together"; English "college") was any association in ancient Rome with a legal personality.wikipedia
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Club (organization)

clubclubsclubhouse
Collegia could function as guilds, social clubs, or burial societies; in practice, in ancient Rome, they sometimes became organized bodies of local businessmen and even criminals, who ran the mercantile/criminal activities in a given urban region, or rione.
Organizations of the sort have existed for many years, as evidenced by Ancient Greek clubs and associations (collegia) in Ancient Rome.

Legal person

legal personalitylegal entitybody corporate
A collegium (plural collegia, "gathered together"; English "college") was any association in ancient Rome with a legal personality.
The concept of legal personhood for organizations of people is at least as old as Ancient Rome: a variety of collegial institutions enjoyed the benefit under Roman law.

Burial society

burial societiesburial insuranceburial clubs
Collegia could function as guilds, social clubs, or burial societies; in practice, in ancient Rome, they sometimes became organized bodies of local businessmen and even criminals, who ran the mercantile/criminal activities in a given urban region, or rione.
Terms for these include hetaeria, collegium, and sodalitas.

College of Pontiffs

pontiffspontificespontifex
The College of Pontiffs (Latin: Collegium Pontificum; see collegium) was a body of the ancient Roman state whose members were the highest-ranking priests of the state religion.

Ancient Rome

RomanRomansRome
A collegium (plural collegia, "gathered together"; English "college") was any association in ancient Rome with a legal personality.
These areas, often built by upper class property owners to rent, were often centred upon collegia or taberna.

Pontifex maximus

Supremepontifices maximiHigh Priest
The pontifex maximus (Latin, "greatest priest" ) was the chief high priest of the College of Pontiffs (Collegium Pontificum) in ancient Rome.

Quindecimviri sacris faciundis

quindecimviridecemviri sacris faciundisdecemvir sacris faciundis
In ancient Rome, the quindecimviri sacris faciundis were the fifteen (quindecim) members of a college (collegium) with priestly duties.

Fetial

fetialesfetialsFeciales
They formed a collegium devoted to Jupiter as the patron of good faith.

Augur

augursauguriesCollege of Augurs
Roman augurs were part of a college (Latin collegium) of priests who shared the duties and responsibilities of the position.

Epulones

Septemviri epulonumseptemviri epulonesepulo
epulō; "feasters") arranged feasts and public banquets at festivals and games (ludi) They constituted one of the four great religious corporations (quattuor amplissima collegia) of ancient Roman priests.

Salii

Salii PalatiniSalian priestsSalii Collinus
King Tullus Hostilius is said to have established another collegium of Salii in fulfillment of a vow which he made in the second war with Fidenae and Veii.

College of Aesculapius and Hygia

The College of Aesculapius and Hygia was an association (collegium) founded in the mid-2nd century AD by a wealthy Roman woman named Salvia Marcellina, in honor of her dead husband and the procurator for whom he had worked.

Guild

guildscraft guildtrade guild
Collegia could function as guilds, social clubs, or burial societies; in practice, in ancient Rome, they sometimes became organized bodies of local businessmen and even criminals, who ran the mercantile/criminal activities in a given urban region, or rione.

Rione

rionidistrictdistricts
Collegia could function as guilds, social clubs, or burial societies; in practice, in ancient Rome, they sometimes became organized bodies of local businessmen and even criminals, who ran the mercantile/criminal activities in a given urban region, or rione.

Senate of the Roman Republic

senatorSenatevir clarissimus
The organization of a collegium was often modeled on that of civic governing bodies, the Senate of Rome being the epitome.

Curia

curiaeRoman CuriaGeneral Curia
The meeting hall was often known as the curia, the same term as that applied to that of the Roman Senate.

Consul

consulsRoman consulConsul General
By law, only three people were required in order to create a legal collegium; the only exception was the college of consuls, which included only the two consuls.

Roman emperor

EmperoremperorsWestern Roman Emperor
The Roman Emperor Aurelian imposed state control over collegia in the late 3rd Century AD.

Aurelian

Lucius Domitius AurelianusEmperor AurelianAurelianus
The Roman Emperor Aurelian imposed state control over collegia in the late 3rd Century AD.

Vestal Virgin

Vestal VirginsVestalsVestal
The College of the Vestals and its well-being were regarded as fundamental to the continuance and security of Rome.

Vigintisexviri

vigintivirivigintiviratemagistratus minores