The Colony of British Columbia in 1863
Cabin on the Fraser, B.C., "The Bacon is Cooked", About 1862
Sir James Douglas, first governor of the Colony of British Columbia
A portion of the Cariboo Road in the Fraser Canyon, c. 1867
Moody likened his vision of the nascent Colony of British Columbia to the pastoral scenes painted by Aelbert Cuyp
Moody designed the first Coat of arms of British Columbia

It was the catalyst for the founding of the Colony of British Columbia, the building of early road infrastructure, and the founding of many towns.

- Fraser Canyon Gold Rush

Almost overnight, some ten to twenty thousand men moved into the region around present-day Yale, British Columbia, sparking the Fraser Canyon Gold Rush.

- Colony of British Columbia (1858–1866)

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British Columbia

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Westernmost province of Canada.

Westernmost province of Canada.

British Columbia's geography is epitomized by the variety and intensity of its physical relief, which has defined patterns of settlement and industry since colonization.
Outline map of British Columbia with significant cities and towns
Köppen climate types in British Columbia
The Strait of Georgia, near Vancouver
Shuswap Lake as seen from Sorrento
The Okanagan region has a climate suitable to vineyards.
Mount Robson, Canadian Rockies
Odaray Mountain and Lake O'Hara
Yoho National Park
Cheakamus Lake in Garibaldi Provincial Park
Humpback whale in Sooke coast
'Namgis Thunderbird Transformation Mask, 19th century
Fort San Miguel at Nootka in 1793
Kwakwaka'wakw house pole, second half of the 19th century
Fort Rupert, Vancouver Island, 1851
Cattle near the Maas by Dutch painter Aelbert Cuyp. Moody likened his vision of the nascent Colony of British Columbia to the pastoral scenes painted by Cuyp.
Victoria, 1864
Lord Strathcona drives the Last Spike of the Canadian Pacific Railway, at Craigellachie, November 7, 1885. Completion of the transcontinental railroad was a condition of British Columbia's entry into Confederation.
Memorial to the "last spike" in Craigellachie
Statue of Queen Victoria outside the British Columbia Parliament Buildings in Victoria
Internment camp for Japanese Canadians during World War II
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W.A.C. Bennett, 25th premier of British Columbia
British Columbia's pavilion for Expo 86, Vancouver
The Coquihalla Highway was one of the legacies of the Expo 86 world's fair, though creation of the toll highway sparked controversy. Tolling was removed in 2008.
The cauldron of the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver
Population density map of British Columbia, with regional district borders shown
The Vancouver skyline
Canada Place in Downtown Vancouver
Entrance to Telus Garden
The British Columbia Parliament Buildings in Victoria
Coat of arms' escutcheon of the current lieutenant governor
John Horgan is premier, BC's head of government.
The meeting chamber of the Legislative Assembly
The flower of the Pacific dogwood is often associated with British Columbia.
The Alex Fraser Bridge on Highway 91 between Richmond and Delta
British Columbia Highway 1 near Brentwood, Burnaby
CPR train traversing the Stoney Creek Bridge
Spirit of Vancouver Island S-class ferry
Ice sailing in Whistler
Shoreline Trail in Victoria
Hatley Castle on the campus of Royal Roads University
Aerial view of Simon Fraser University in Burnaby
Quest University Canada Academic Building, aerial view

The Colony of British Columbia (1858–1866) was subsequently founded by Richard Clement Moody, and by the Royal Engineers, Columbia Detachment, in response to the Fraser Canyon Gold Rush.

Moody likened his vision of the nascent Colony of British Columbia to the pastoral scenes painted by Aelbert Cuyp

Royal Engineers, Columbia Detachment

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Moody likened his vision of the nascent Colony of British Columbia to the pastoral scenes painted by Aelbert Cuyp
Moody designed the first Coat of arms of British Columbia

The Columbia Detachment of the Royal Engineers was a contingent of the Royal Engineers of the British Army that was responsible for the foundation of British Columbia as the Colony of British Columbia (1858–66).

When news of the Fraser Canyon Gold Rush reached London, Sir Edward Bulwer-Lytton, Secretary of State for the Colonies, requested that War Office recommend a field officer who were 'a man of good judgement possessing a knowledge of mankind' to lead a Corps of 150 (later increased to 172) Royal Engineers who had been selected for their 'superior discipline and intelligence'.

Richard Clement Moody, 1859

Richard Clement Moody

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British governor, engineer, architect, and soldier.

British governor, engineer, architect, and soldier.

Richard Clement Moody, 1859
Richard Clement was born, in 1813, at St. Ann's Garrison, Bridgetown, Barbados.
Richard Clement Moody became Head of School at Royal Military Academy, Woolwich at 15 years of age.
Moody was the founder of British Columbia
Moody designed the first Coat of arms of British Columbia

Moody, who is considered to be the founding father of British Columbia, founded the Colony of British Columbia, when he was selected to 'found a second England on the shores of the Pacific' by Sir Edward Bulwer-Lytton, who desired to send to the nascent Colony 'representatives of the best of British culture' who had 'courtesy, high breeding, and urbane knowledge of the world'.

When news of the Fraser Canyon Gold Rush reached London, Sir Edward Bulwer-Lytton, Secretary of State for the Colonies, requested that War Office recommend a field officer who were 'a man of good judgement possessing a knowledge of mankind' to lead a Corps of 150 (later increased to 172) Royal Engineers who had been selected for their 'superior discipline and intelligence'.

James Douglas with Order of the Bath honours

James Douglas (governor)

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James Douglas with Order of the Bath honours
Lady Amelia Connolly Douglas, his wife
The Douglas Obelisk
Statue of Douglas, at Fort Langley National Historic Site in Fort Langley, BC
Grave of Sir James Douglas at Ross Bay Cemetery in Victoria, BC

Sir James Douglas (August 15, 1803 – August 2, 1877), was a British Columbian fur trader and politician who became the first Governor of the Colony of British Columbia.

In 1858, he became the first Governor of the Colony of British Columbia and asserted the authority of the British Empire during the Fraser Canyon Gold Rush, which had the potential to turn the Mainland into an American state.

Edward Bulwer-Lytton

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English writer and politician.

English writer and politician.

Edward Bulwer-Lytton. His Harold, the Last of the Saxons (1848) was the source for Verdi's opera Aroldo.
Bulwer-Lytton in later life
Caricature by Ape published in Vanity Fair in 1870
1849 printing of Pelham with Hablot K. Browne (Phiz) frontispiece: Pelham's electioneering visit to the Rev. Combermere St Quintin, who is surprised at dinner with his family.

When news of the Fraser Canyon Gold Rush reached London, Bulwer-Lytton, as Secretary of State for the Colonies, requested that the War Office recommend a field officer, "a man of good judgement possessing a knowledge of mankind", to lead a Corps of 150 (later increased to 172) Royal Engineers, who had been selected for their "superior discipline and intelligence".

Moody was charged to establish British order and transform the newly established Colony of British Columbia (1858–66) into the British Empire's "bulwark in the farthest west" and "found a second England on the shores of the Pacific."

Lytton, British Columbia

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Village of about 250 residents in southern British Columbia, Canada, on the east side of the Fraser River and primarily the south side of the Thompson River, where it flows southwesterly into the Fraser.

Village of about 250 residents in southern British Columbia, Canada, on the east side of the Fraser River and primarily the south side of the Thompson River, where it flows southwesterly into the Fraser.

Lytton's welcome sign
The confluence of the Fraser and Thompson rivers showing the mixing of the two different coloured waters. Botanie Mountain right background, Lillooet Ranges at left.
Street sign in Lytton

The town was founded during the Fraser Canyon Gold Rush of 1858–59, when it was known as "The Forks."

This event was held as part of the Village of Lytton's BC150 celebrations, which marked the 150th anniversary of the date that the community received its name, in addition to the province-wide celebration of the establishment of the original Colony of British Columbia on August 2, 1858.

Edward McGowan

McGowan's War

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Bloodless war that took place in Yale, British Columbia in the fall of 1858.

Bloodless war that took place in Yale, British Columbia in the fall of 1858.

Edward McGowan

The conflict posed a threat to the newly established British authority on the British Columbia mainland (which had only just been declared a colony the previous summer), at the onset of the Fraser Canyon Gold Rush.

The story, as relayed to Victoria by Vigilance Committee messengers, was that Ned McGowan had launched an attempt to overthrow the British authority in the new colony and declare the gold fields to be part of the United States.

Hope, British Columbia

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District municipality at the confluence of the Fraser and Coquihalla rivers in the province of British Columbia, Canada.

District municipality at the confluence of the Fraser and Coquihalla rivers in the province of British Columbia, Canada.

The Fraser River west of Hope
The Coquihalla River near Hope
Totem overlooking Fraser River in downtown Hope
Lake and mountain view, Hope
Friendship Garden
Ogilvie Peak rises some 1,800 m above the east shore of Kawkawa Lake and is the southwesternmost summit of the Coquihalla Range of the Cascade Mountains.

The area was transformed by the Fraser Canyon Gold Rush, beginning in 1858.

Hope became part of the new British colony of British Columbia when it was created on 2 August 1858.

Sir Matthew Baillie Begbie

Matthew Baillie Begbie

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British lawyer, politician, and judge.

British lawyer, politician, and judge.

Sir Matthew Baillie Begbie
Sir Matthew Baillie Begbie
Mt. Begbie (left)
Tombstone at Ross Bay Cemetery
Epitaph
Historical Marker at Bastion Square
Statue formerly displayed at the Law Society of British Columbia Building, Hornby Street, Vancouver BC, by Ralph Sketch.
Sir Matthew Begbie Elementary School, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

In 1858, Begbie became the first Chief Justice of the Crown Colony of British Columbia in colonial times and in the first decades after British Columbia joined Confederation as a province of Canada.

Given the influx of prospectors and others during Fraser Canyon Gold Rush and the following Cariboo Gold Rush of 1861, Begbie played a crucial role in the establishment of law and order throughout the new colony.