Color motion picture film

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Color motion picture film refers both to unexposed color photographic film in a format suitable for use in a motion picture camera, and to finished motion picture film, ready for use in a projector, which bears images in color.wikipedia
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Kinemacolor

Kinemacolor Film CompanyKinemacolor Film CompanyKinemacolour
A simplified additive system was successfully commercialised in 1909 as Kinemacolor.
Kinemacolor was the first successful colour motion picture process, used commercially from 1908 to 1914.

Edward Raymond Turner

Lee-Turner ColourLee-Turner Process
The first color cinematography was by additive color systems such as the one patented by Edward Raymond Turner in 1899 and tested in 1902.
He produced the earliest known colour motion picture film footage

Technicolor

three-strip Technicolortwo-color Technicolortechnicolour
Before 1932, when three-strip Technicolor was introduced, commercialized subtractive processes used only two color components and could reproduce only a limited range of color. Early processes used color filters to photograph the color components as completely separate images (e.g., three-strip Technicolor) or adjacent microscopic image fragments (e.g., Dufaycolor) in a one-layer black-and-white emulsion.
Technicolor is a series of color motion picture processes, the first version dating to 1916, and followed by improved versions over several decades.

Eastmancolor

WarnercolorEastman ColorEastmancolour
In the US, Eastman Kodak's Eastmancolor was the usual choice, but it was often re-branded with another trade name, such as "WarnerColor", by the studio or the film processor.
Color motion picture film, for background on Eastmancolor and other motion picture processes in general

Film

motion picturemoviecinema
Color motion picture film refers both to unexposed color photographic film in a format suitable for use in a motion picture camera, and to finished motion picture film, ready for use in a projector, which bears images in color.
Another major technological development was the introduction of "natural color," which meant color that was photographically recorded from nature rather than added to black-and-white prints by hand-coloring, stencil-coloring or other arbitrary procedures, although the earliest processes typically yielded colors which were far from "natural" in appearance.

Georges Méliès

MélièsGeorge MélièsMelies
George Méliès offered hand-painted prints of his own films at an additional cost over the black-and-white versions, including the visual-effects pioneering A Trip to the Moon (1902).
Méliès was well-known for the use of special effects, popularizing such techniques as substitution splices, multiple exposures, time-lapse photography, dissolves, and hand-painted colour.

Eastman Color Negative

EastmancolorcolourEastman
Later color films were standardized into two distinct processes: Eastman Color Negative 2 chemistry (camera negative stocks, duplicating interpositive and internegative stocks) and Eastman Color Positive 2 chemistry (positive prints for direct projection), usually abbreviated as ECN-2 and ECP-2.
Eastman Color Negative (ECN) is a photographic processing system created by Kodak in the 1950s for the development of monopack color negative motion picture film stock.

Eastman Color Positive

Eastman Color Positive 2ECPECP processes
Later color films were standardized into two distinct processes: Eastman Color Negative 2 chemistry (camera negative stocks, duplicating interpositive and internegative stocks) and Eastman Color Positive 2 chemistry (positive prints for direct projection), usually abbreviated as ECN-2 and ECP-2.
Eastman Color Positive (ECP) is a photographic processing system created by Kodak in the 1950s for the development of monopack color positive print for direct projection motion picture film stock.

Dufaycolor

Early processes used color filters to photograph the color components as completely separate images (e.g., three-strip Technicolor) or adjacent microscopic image fragments (e.g., Dufaycolor) in a one-layer black-and-white emulsion.
In 1926, Louis Dufay's interests were purchased by British paper manufacturing firm Spicers, which then funded research to produce a workable colour motion picture film.

Prizma

Prizma ColorPrisma ColorPrizmacolor
The first truly successful subtractive color process was William van Doren Kelley's Prizma, an early color process that was first introduced at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City on 8 February 1917.
The Prizma Color system was a color motion picture process, invented in 1913 by William Van Doren Kelley and Charles Raleigh.

Additive color

additiveadditive colouradditive colors
The first color cinematography was by additive color systems such as the one patented by Edward Raymond Turner in 1899 and tested in 1902.
Color motion picture film

Color photography

colorcolour photographycolor film
Color motion picture film refers both to unexposed color photographic film in a format suitable for use in a motion picture camera, and to finished motion picture film, ready for use in a projector, which bears images in color.
Color motion picture film

Subtractive color

subtractivesubtractive color mixingsubtractive mixing
Around 1920, the first practical subtractive color processes were introduced.
Color motion picture film

Trucolor

In 1947, the United States Justice Department filed an antitrust suit against Technicolor for monopolization of color cinematography (even though rival processes such as Cinecolor and Trucolor were in general use).
Trucolor was a color motion picture process used and owned by the Consolidated Film Industries division of Republic Pictures.

Cinecolor

SuperCinecolorColor Corporation of AmericaCinecolor Corporation
In 1947, the United States Justice Department filed an antitrust suit against Technicolor for monopolization of color cinematography (even though rival processes such as Cinecolor and Trucolor were in general use).
Cinecolor was an early subtractive color-model two color motion picture process, based upon the Prizma system of the 1910s and 1920s and the Multicolor system of the late 1920s and 1930s.

Gasparcolor

Gasparcolor, a single-strip 3-color system, was developed in 1933 by the Hungarian chemist Dr. Bela Gaspar.
Gasparcolor was a color motion picture film system, developed in 1933 by the Hungarian chemist Dr. Bela Gaspar (1898-1973).

Ruth Roland

The only feature film known to have been made in this process, Cupid Angling (1918) — starring Ruth Roland and with cameo appearances by Mary Pickford and Douglas Fairbanks — was filmed in the Lake Lagunitas area of Marin County, California.
She appeared in an early color feature film Cupid Angling (1918) made in the Natural Color process invented by Leon F. Douglass, and filmed in the Lake Lagunitas area of Marin County, California.

List of color film systems

List of colour film systems
List of color film systems
This is a list of color film processes known to have been created for photographing and exhibiting motion pictures in color since the first attempts were made in the late 1890s.

Handschiegl color process

dye-transfer techniqueHandschiegl colour processHandschiegl processes
In the United States, St. Louis engraver Max Handschiegl and cinematographer Alvin Wyckoff created the Handschiegl Color Process, a dye-transfer equivalent of the stencil process, first used in Joan the Woman (1917) directed by Cecil B. DeMille, and used in special effects sequences for films such as The Phantom of the Opera (1925).
Color motion picture film

Multicolor

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Multicolor
Multicolor is a subtractive natural color motion picture process.

CinemaScope

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By 1953, and especially with the introduction of anamorphic wide screen CinemaScope, Eastmancolor became a marketing imperative as CinemaScope was incompatible with Technicolor's Three-Strip camera and lenses.
Twentieth Century-Fox's pre-production of The Robe, originally committed to Technicolor Three-Strip origination, was halted so that the film could be changed to a CinemaScope production (using Eastmancolor, but processed by Technicolor).

Telecine

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In 2012, curators at the National Media Museum in Bradford, UK, had the original custom-format nitrate film copied to black-and-white 35 mm film, which was then scanned into a digital video format by telecine.
Color motion picture film

Bipack color

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This bipack color system used two strips of film running through the camera, one recording red, and one recording blue-green light.
Color motion picture film

Claude Friese-Greene

C. Friese-GreeneClaudeFriese-Greene Natural Color
William Friese-Greene invented another additive color system called Biocolour, which was developed by his son Claude Friese-Greene after William's death in 1921.
Color motion picture film

Duplitized film

duplitized print stockduplitized stock
Filter-photographed red and blue-green records were printed onto the front and back of one strip of black-and-white duplitized film.
Color motion picture film