Color television

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Color television is a television transmission technology that includes information on the color of the picture, so the video image can be displayed in color on the television set.wikipedia
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John Logie Baird

BairdBaird TelevisionBaird Television Ltd.
A practical demonstration of mechanically-scanned color television was given by John Logie Baird in 1928, but the limitations of a mechanical system were apparent even then.
John Logie Baird FRSE (13 August 1888 – 14 June 1946) was a Scottish engineer, innovator, one of the inventors of the mechanical television, demonstrating the first working television system on 26 January 1926, and inventor of both the first publicly demonstrated colour television system, and the first purely electronic colour television picture tube.

Digital television

digitaldigital TVDTV
Broadcasters began to switch from analog color television technology to digital television around 2006.

RCA

Radio Corporation of AmericaRCA CorporationRCA Astro
In the United States, after considerable research, the National Television Systems Committee approved an all-electronic system developed by RCA which encoded the color information separately from the brightness information and greatly reduced the resolution of the color information in order to conserve bandwidth.
The company was also a pioneer in the introduction and development of television, both black-and-white and especially, color television.

Black and white

black-and-whiteblack and white filmblack & white
It is considered an improvement on the earliest television technology, monochrome or black and white television, in which the image is displayed in shades of gray (grayscale). One of the great technical challenges of introducing color broadcast television was the desire to conserve bandwidth, potentially three times that of the existing black-and-white standards, and not use an excessive amount of radio spectrum.
Scottish inventor John Logie Baird demonstrated the world's first color television transmission on July 3, 1928 using a mechanical process.

NTSC

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The NTSC standard represented a major technical achievement.
In 1953, a second NTSC standard was adopted, which allowed for color television broadcasting which was compatible with the existing stock of black-and-white receivers.

Television

TVtelevisedtelevisions
Color television is a television transmission technology that includes information on the color of the picture, so the video image can be displayed in color on the television set.
His experiments with TV (known as telectroescopía at first) began in 1931 and led to a patent for the "trichromatic field sequential system" color television in 1940.

History of television

televisionelectronic televisiontelevision history
The invention of color television standards is an important part of the history of television, and it is described in the technology of television article.
His experiments with TV (known as telectroescopía at first) began in 1931 and led to a patent for the "trichromatic field sequential system" color television in 1940.

Outline of television broadcasting

television broadcastingTelevision stationstelevision
Television broadcasting stations and networks in most parts of the world upgraded from black and white to color transmission in the 1960s to the 1980s.

Field-sequential color system

field-sequentialfield-sequential colorfield sequential
In these systems the three colored images were sent one after each other, in either complete frames in the "field-sequential color system", or for each line in the "line-sequential" system.
A field-sequential color system (FSC) is a color television system in which the primary color information is transmitted in successive images and which relies on the human vision system to fuse the successive images into a color picture.

CBS

CBS TelevisionColumbia Broadcasting SystemCBS-TV
In 1939, Hungarian engineer Peter Carl Goldmark introduced an electro-mechanical system while at CBS, which contained an Iconoscope sensor.
It can also refer to some of CBS's first demonstrations of color television, which were held in a former Tiffany & Co. building in New York City in 1950.

Terrestrial television

Broadcastover-the-airterrestrial
One of the great technical challenges of introducing color broadcast television was the desire to conserve bandwidth, potentially three times that of the existing black-and-white standards, and not use an excessive amount of radio spectrum.
Television broadcasts were in black and white until the transition to color television in the 1950s and 60s.

Telechrome

As early as 1940, Baird had started work on a fully electronic system he called the "Telechrome".
Telechrome was the first all-electronic single-tube color television system.

Geer tube

The Geer tube was similar to Baird's concept, but used small pyramids with the phosphors deposited on their outside faces, instead of Baird's 3D patterning on a flat surface.
The Geer tube was an early single-tube color television cathode ray tube, developed by Willard Geer.

Beam-index tube

Apple" tube
Color Television Inc. (CTI) demonstrated its line-sequential system, while Philco demonstrated a dot-sequential system based on its beam-index tube-based "Apple" tube technology.
The beam-index tube is a color television cathode ray tube (CRT) design, using phosphor stripes and active-feedback timing, rather than phosphor dots and a beam-shadowing mask as developed by RCA.

Penetron

beam penetration tubespenetration color
The Penetron used three layers of phosphor on top of each other and increased the power of the beam to reach the upper layers when drawing those colors.
Unlike a conventional color television, the penetron produces a limited color gamut, typically two colors and their combination.

Color Television Inc.

Color Television Inc. (CTI)
Color Television Inc. (CTI) demonstrated its line-sequential system, while Philco demonstrated a dot-sequential system based on its beam-index tube-based "Apple" tube technology.
Color Television Inc. was an American research and development firm founded in 1947 and devoted to creating a color television system to be approved by the Federal Communications Commission as the U.S. color broadcasting standard.

Premiere (TV program)

PremierePremiere'' (TV program)
An unsuccessful lawsuit by RCA delayed the first commercial network broadcast in color until June 25, 1951, when a musical variety special titled simply Premiere was shown over a network of five East Coast CBS affiliates.
A major downside to the CBS system was that the video images being transmitted were not "compatible" with current black-and-white television sets, meaning that unless these sets were modified they would render these video transmissions as meaningless lines and squiggles (with the very rare exception of some sets which would produce four small black-and-white images, one in each corner of the screen.)

WCBS-TV

WCBSCBS New YorkW2XAB
CBS initiated a limited schedule of color broadcasts from its New York station WCBS-TV Mondays to Saturdays beginning November 14, 1950, making ten color receivers available for the viewing public.
On August 11, 1951, WCBS-TV broadcast the first baseball game on color television, between the Brooklyn Dodgers and Boston Braves from Ebbets Field.

Hovannes Adamian

Hovhannes Abgari Adamian
An Armenian inventor, Hovannes Adamian, also experimented with color television as early as 1907.
The first experimental color television was shown in London in 1928 based on Adamian's tricolor principle, and he is recognized as one of the founders of color television.

WUSA (TV)

WUSAWUSA-TVWTOP-TV
During its campaign for FCC approval, CBS gave the first demonstrations of color television to the general public, showing an hour of color programs daily Mondays through Saturdays, beginning January 12, 1950, and running for the remainder of the month, over WOIC in Washington, D.C., where the programs could be viewed on eight 16-inch color receivers in a public building.
In July 1950, WTOP-TV became the first television station in Washington authorized to broadcast color television in the 405-line field sequential color standard, which was incompatible with the black-and-white 525-line NTSC standard.

Mechanical television

Televisormechanicalelectromechanical television
A number of such mechanical television systems were being used experimentally in the 1920s.
The CBS color television system of Peter Goldmark used such technology in 1940.

Guillermo González Camarena

GuillermoGuillermo '''González CamarenaGuillermo Gonzalez Camarena
Guillermo González Camarena independently invented and developed a field-sequential tricolor disk system in México in the late 1930s, for which he requested a patent in México on August 19, 1940, and in the United States in 1941.
Guillermo González Camarena (17 February 1917 – 18 April 1965) was a Mexican electrical engineer who was the inventor of a color-wheel type of color television, and who also introduced color television to the world.

Peter Carl Goldmark

Peter GoldmarkPeter C. GoldmarkDr. Peter Goldmark
In 1939, Hungarian engineer Peter Carl Goldmark introduced an electro-mechanical system while at CBS, which contained an Iconoscope sensor.
In addition to his work on the LP record, Goldmark developed field-sequential color technology for color television while at CBS.

Adventures of Superman (TV series)

Adventures of SupermanThe Adventures of SupermanSuperman
Several syndicated shows had episodes filmed in color during the 1950s, including The Cisco Kid, The Lone Ranger, My Friend Flicka, and Adventures of Superman.
The show's first two seasons (episodes 1–52, 26 titles per season) were filmed in black and white; seasons three through six (episodes 53–104, 13 titles per season) were filmed in color but were originally telecast in black and white.

1965–66 United States network television schedule

1965–661965–19661965-1966 television season
As a result, NBC provided the catalyst for rapid color expansion by announcing that its prime time schedule for fall 1965 would be almost entirely in color.
''Note: This is the first season in which a majority of prime time programs were broadcast in color.