Columbia (name)

ColumbiaLady Columbia ColumbiaColumbia,female symbolGoddess ColumbiaHistorical ColumbiaLady Columbia statueLibertyMiss Columbia
Columbia is the female personification of the United States.wikipedia
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United States

AmericanU.S.USA
Columbia is the female personification of the United States.
"Columbia", a name popular in poetry and songs of the late 18th century, derives its origin from Christopher Columbus; it appears in the name "District of Columbia."

Washington, D.C.

Washington, DCWashington D.C.District of Columbia
It has given rise to the names of many persons, places, objects, institutions and companies; for example: Columbia University, the District of Columbia (the national capital of the United States), and the ship Columbia Rediviva, which would give its name to the Columbia River.
The federal district was named Columbia (a feminine form of "Columbus"), which was a poetic name for the United States commonly in use at that time.

Columbia University

ColumbiaColumbia CollegeUniversity of Columbia
It has given rise to the names of many persons, places, objects, institutions and companies; for example: Columbia University, the District of Columbia (the national capital of the United States), and the ship Columbia Rediviva, which would give its name to the Columbia River.
The Act created a Board of Regents to oversee the resuscitation of King's College, and, in an effort to demonstrate its support for the new Republic, the Legislature stipulated that "the College within the City of New York heretofore called King's College be forever hereafter called and known by the name of Columbia College", a reference to Columbia, an alternative name for America.

Statue of Liberty

The Statue of LibertyLady LibertyLiberty
Images of the Statue of Liberty largely displaced personified Columbia as the female symbol of the United States by around 1920, although Lady Liberty was seen as an aspect of Columbia.
One of these symbols, the personified Columbia, was seen as an embodiment of the United States in the manner that Britannia was identified with the United Kingdom and Marianne came to represent France.

The Gentleman's Magazine

Gentleman's MagazineGentleman’s MagazineGentlemen's Magazine
The name Columbia for America first appeared in 1738 in the weekly publication of the debates of the British Parliament in Edward Cave's The Gentleman's Magazine.
The name "Columbia", a poetic name for America coined by Johnson, first appears in a 1738 weekly publication of the debates of the British Parliament in the magazine.

Columbia, South Carolina

ColumbiaColumbia, SCColumbia, S.C.
The name Columbia is a poetic term used for the United States, originating from the name of Christopher Columbus.

Personification of the Americas

personification of Americapersonification of the Americas as an "Indian princess
The earliest type of personification of the Americas, seen in European art from the 16th century onwards, reflected the tropical regions in South and Central America from which the earliest travellers reported back.
In the 18th century, British America began to use personifications based on Britannia and Liberty, as well as Columbia, something of a combination of these.

Space Shuttle Columbia

ColumbiaSpace Shuttle ''ColumbiaColumbia Space Shuttle
Columbia was also the female symbol of the United States.

Britannia

BritainBrittaniaBritania
It originated from the name of Italian explorer Christopher Columbus and from the ending -ia, common in Latin names of countries (paralleling Britannia, Gallia, and others). Especially in the 19th century, Columbia was visualized as a goddess-like female national personification of the United States and of liberty itself, comparable to the British Britannia, the Italian Italia Turrita and the French Marianne, often seen in political cartoons of the 19th and early 20th century.
Perhaps the best analogy is that Britannia is to the United Kingdom and the British Empire what Marianne is to France or perhaps what Columbia is to the United States.

Columbia Pictures

ColumbiaColumbia Pictures CorporationColumbia Studios
When Columbia Pictures adopted Columbia as its logo in 1924, she appeared (and still appears) bearing a torch—similar to the Statue of Liberty and unlike 19th-century depictions of Columbia.
It adopted the Columbia Pictures name in 1924, went public two years later, and eventually began to use the image of Columbia, the female personification of the United States, as its logo.

Hail, Columbia

Hail ColumbiaThe President's MarchSalve, Columbia
The District of Columbia is named after the personification, as is the traditional patriotic hymn "Hail Columbia", which is the official vice presidential anthem of the United States Vice President.
Columbia is the poetic name for the national personification of the United States, which originated during the 18th century.

Americas

Americathe AmericasAmerican
It was also a historical name used to describe the Americas and the New World.

Christopher Columbus

ColumbusCristoforo ColomboColón
It originated from the name of Italian explorer Christopher Columbus and from the ending -ia, common in Latin names of countries (paralleling Britannia, Gallia, and others).
The name Columbia for "America" first appeared in a 1738 weekly publication of the debates of the British Parliament.

British Columbia

BCBritish Columbia, CanadaB.C.
Ultimately, the Columbia in the name British Columbia is derived from the name of the Columbia Rediviva, an American ship which lent its name to the Columbia River and later the wider region; the Columbia in the name Columbia Rediviva came from the name Columbia for the New World or parts thereof, a reference to Christopher Columbus.

American Revolution

RevolutionRevolutionary WarRevolutionary
Phyllis Wheatley was a black poet who popularized the image of Columbia to represent America.

Columbia County, Pennsylvania

Columbia CountyColumbiaColumbia County line
The county was created on March 22, 1813, from part of Northumberland County and named for Columbia, a poetic name for the United States that alludes to Christopher Columbus.

Niobium

NbcolumbiumNiobium (Nb)
He found a new element in a mineral sample that had been sent to England from Connecticut, United States in 1734 by John Winthrop F.R.S. (grandson of John Winthrop the Younger) and named the mineral columbite and the new element columbium after Columbia, the poetical name for the United States.

Memorial Hall (Philadelphia)

Memorial HallMemorial Hall, Fairmount Park, Philadelphia
Surmounting the dome is the 23 ft statue of Columbia (the poetic symbol of the United States) holding a laurel branch.

Liberty (personification)

LibertyGoddess of LibertyLady Liberty
Especially in the 19th century, Columbia was visualized as a goddess-like female national personification of the United States and of liberty itself, comparable to the British Britannia, the Italian Italia Turrita and the French Marianne, often seen in political cartoons of the 19th and early 20th century.
In the 1790s Columbia, who had been sometimes present in literature for some decades, emerged as a common name for this figure.

Columbia, the Gem of the Ocean

Columbia, Gem of the OceanThree Cheers for the Red White and Blue
The song invokes the historic informal name "Columbia" for the United States and borrows and modifies the phrase "land of the free and the home of the brave" from Francis Scott Key's earlier "Star-Spangled Banner" as "the home of the brave and the free".

National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific

National Cemetery of the PacificHonolulu MemorialPunchbowl National Cemetery
At the top of the staircase in the Court of Honor is a statue of Lady Columbia, also known as Lady Liberty, or Justice.

BioShock Infinite

Bioshock: InfiniteColumbiaBioShock
BioShock Infinite is set in 1912 and takes place in a fictional steampunk city-state called "Columbia"— named in homage to the female personification of the United States —which is suspended in the air through a combination of giant blimps, balloons, reactors, propellers, and "quantum levitation".

Columbia of Carrick

The mural depicts Columbia, (the personification of the United States) with arms outstretched, surrounded by American Beauty roses, and flanked by the words "Yearning to Breathe Free", from the poem The New Colossus, by Emma Lazarus.

Phrygian cap

liberty capcap of libertycap
Her headdress varied and sometimes it included feathers reminiscent of a Native American headdress while other times it was a laurel wreath, but most often it was a cap of liberty.
Later, the symbol of republicanism and anti-monarchial sentiment appeared in the United States as headgear of Columbia, who in turn was visualized as a goddess-like female national personification of the United States and of Liberty herself.

Apollo 11

1969 moon landingmoon landingfirst moon landing
It also referenced Columbia, a historical name of the United States.