Columbia College (New York)

Columbia CollegeColumbia College of Columbia UniversityColumbia College, Columbia UniversityColumbia UniversityColumbiaKing's CollegeColumbia College, New YorkCCColumbia College TodayKings College
Columbia College is the oldest undergraduate college of Columbia University, situated on the university's main campus in Morningside Heights in the borough of Manhattan in New York City.wikipedia
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Core Curriculum (Columbia College)

Core CurriculumColumbia UniversityColumbia's Core Curriculum
The college is distinctive for its comprehensive Core Curriculum, and is among the most selective colleges in its admissions. The academic history of traditions of Columbia College clearly had their beginnings in the classical education of the Enlightenment, and in this mold, the college's famous Core Curriculum was officially recognized and codified in 1919 with John Erskine's first seminar on the great books of the western tradition.
The Core Curriculum was originally developed as the main curriculum used by Columbia University's Columbia College in 1919.

Alexander Hamilton

HamiltonHamiltonianA. Hamilton
Even at this young age, King's College had already educated Alexander Hamilton, who served as military aide to General George Washington, initiated and authored most of The Federalist Papers, and then as the first Secretary of the Treasury; John Jay, author of several of the Federalist Papers and the first Chief Justice of the United States; Robert Livingston, one of the Committee of Five who drafted the Declaration of Independence; and Gouverneur Morris, who authored most of the United States Constitution.
Hamilton entered King's College (now Columbia) in New York City in the autumn of 1773 "as a private student", and officially matriculated in May 1774.

Gouverneur Morris

Gouvernor MorrisGouveneur Morrisauthor
Even at this young age, King's College had already educated Alexander Hamilton, who served as military aide to General George Washington, initiated and authored most of The Federalist Papers, and then as the first Secretary of the Treasury; John Jay, author of several of the Federalist Papers and the first Chief Justice of the United States; Robert Livingston, one of the Committee of Five who drafted the Declaration of Independence; and Gouverneur Morris, who authored most of the United States Constitution.
After attending Columbia College, he studied law under Judge William Smith and earned admission to the bar.

Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science

Columbia School of MinesSchool of MinesSchool of Engineering and Applied Science
During the college's forty years at this location, in addition to granting the Bachelor of Arts and Doctor of Medicine degrees, the faculties of the college were expanded to include the Columbia Law School (founded 1858), the Columbia School of Mines (founded 1864, now known as the Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science).
The school consists of approximately 300 undergraduates in each graduating class and maintains close links with its undergraduate liberal arts sister school Columbia College which shares housing with SEAS students.

Samuel Bard (physician)

Samuel BardDr. Samuel Bard
In 1767, Samuel Bard established a medical college at the school, now known as the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, which was the first medical school to grant the Doctor of Medicine (M.D.) degree in America.
He first studied at King's College, and in September 1761 sailed to Europe to obtain a thorough medical education.

Ivy League

IvyAll-Ivy LeagueEastern Intercollegiate League
For the class of 2021, the college accepted 5.8% of its applicants, the second lowest acceptance rate in the Ivy League behind only Harvard.
However, it is clear that Harvard, Princeton, Yale and Columbia met on November 23, 1876 at the so-called Massasoit Convention to decide on uniform rules for the emerging game of American football, which rapidly spread.

Robert R. Livingston (chancellor)

Robert R. LivingstonRobert LivingstonChancellor Livingston
Even at this young age, King's College had already educated Alexander Hamilton, who served as military aide to General George Washington, initiated and authored most of The Federalist Papers, and then as the first Secretary of the Treasury; John Jay, author of several of the Federalist Papers and the first Chief Justice of the United States; Robert Livingston, one of the Committee of Five who drafted the Declaration of Independence; and Gouverneur Morris, who authored most of the United States Constitution.
King's College was renamed Columbia College of Columbia University following the American Revolution in 1784.

Barnard College

BarnardBarnard College of Columbia UniversityBarnard College, Columbia University
The complexity of managing the institution had been further increased when Barnard College for Women became affiliated with Columbia in 1889 followed by Teachers College of Columbia University in 1891.
For its first 229 years Columbia College of Columbia University admitted only men for undergraduate study.

Seth Low

Anne Wroe Scollay CurtisLow campaignMayor Seth Low
(Though technically known as the "School of Arts," the undergraduate division was often called "The College proper" to avoid confusion.) After Seth Low became president of Columbia College in 1890, he advocated the division of the individual schools and colleges into their own semi-autonomous entities under the central administration of the university. Other political figures in this group include statesman and educator Nicholas Murray Butler, New York Governor DeWitt Clinton, U.S. Secretary of State Hamilton Fish, South African anti-apartheid leader Pixley ka Isaka Seme, Chinese diplomat Wellington Koo, many New York City mayors, including Seth Low and John Purroy Mitchel, as well as spymaster William Joseph Donovan.
Low attended Poly Prep Country Day School in Brooklyn and Columbia College.

John Erskine (educator)

John ErskineJohn ErksineJohn Erskine,
The academic history of traditions of Columbia College clearly had their beginnings in the classical education of the Enlightenment, and in this mold, the college's famous Core Curriculum was officially recognized and codified in 1919 with John Erskine's first seminar on the great books of the western tradition.
In 1920, he instituted Columbia College's General Honors Course, a two-year undergraduate seminar that would later help inspire "Masterworks of Western Literature," now known commonly as "Literature Humanities," the second component of Columbia College's Core Curriculum.

Michele Moody-Adams

In 2011, after the resignation of Michele Moody-Adams, James Valentini replaced her as Dean of Columbia College.
Between July 1, 2009, and September 2011 she served as Dean of Columbia College and Vice President for Undergraduate Education at Columbia University.

Michael I. Sovern

Michael SovernMichael Ira Sovern
During the leadership of university presidents Michael Sovern and George Erik Rupp, many of Columbia College's facilities were extensively expanded and renovated.
He graduated from the Bronx High School of Science in 1949, summa cum laude from Columbia College in New York City in 1953, and Columbia Law School in 1955, receiving the prestigious John Ordronaux prize for having the highest academic average in his graduating class.

Nicholas Murray Butler

Nicholas M. ButlerNicholas ButlerButler
Other political figures in this group include statesman and educator Nicholas Murray Butler, New York Governor DeWitt Clinton, U.S. Secretary of State Hamilton Fish, South African anti-apartheid leader Pixley ka Isaka Seme, Chinese diplomat Wellington Koo, many New York City mayors, including Seth Low and John Purroy Mitchel, as well as spymaster William Joseph Donovan.
He enrolled in Columbia College (later Columbia University) and joined the Peithologian Society.

Columbia University

ColumbiaColumbia CollegeUniversity of Columbia
Columbia College is the oldest undergraduate college of Columbia University, situated on the university's main campus in Morningside Heights in the borough of Manhattan in New York City. First-year students are housed on the main quad in John Jay, Carman, Wallach, Hartley and Furnald Halls.
The Act created a Board of Regents to oversee the resuscitation of King's College, and, in an effort to demonstrate its support for the new Republic, the Legislature stipulated that "the College within the City of New York heretofore called King's College be forever hereafter called and known by the name of Columbia College", a reference to Columbia, an alternative name for America.

Hamilton Fish

Hamilton Fish, Jr.Hamilton W. Fish, SrSecretary of State Hamilton Fish
Other political figures in this group include statesman and educator Nicholas Murray Butler, New York Governor DeWitt Clinton, U.S. Secretary of State Hamilton Fish, South African anti-apartheid leader Pixley ka Isaka Seme, Chinese diplomat Wellington Koo, many New York City mayors, including Seth Low and John Purroy Mitchel, as well as spymaster William Joseph Donovan.
He attended Columbia College, and later passed the bar.

Samuel Johnson (American educator)

Samuel JohnsonRev. Dr. Samuel JohnsonAmerican Rev. Dr. Samuel Johnson
Samuel Johnson was chosen as the college's first president and was also the college's first (and for a time only) professor.
Without funding and without an official charter, Johnson defiantly opened King's College (now Columbia University) in July 1754.

Wallach Hall

Livingston HallWallachWallach Halls
First-year students are housed on the main quad in John Jay, Carman, Wallach, Hartley and Furnald Halls.
Wallach Hall is the second oldest residence hall (or dormitory) on the campus of Columbia University, and currently houses undergraduate students from Columbia College as well as the Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science.

Alfred Thayer Mahan

MahanAlfred MahanAlfred T. Mahan
Academics listed include philosophers Mortimer Adler and Irwin Edman, historians Jacques Barzun and Alfred Thayer Mahan, economist Arthur Burns, paleontologist Niles Eldredge, drama scholar Brander Matthews, art historian Meyer Schapiro and literary critic Lionel Trilling.
He then studied at Columbia for two years, where he was a member of the Philolexian Society debating club.

Hartley Hall

Hartley
First-year students are housed on the main quad in John Jay, Carman, Wallach, Hartley and Furnald Halls.
Hartley Hall was the first official residence hall (or dormitory) constructed on the campus of Columbia University's Morningside Heights campus, and currently houses undergraduate students from Columbia College as well as the Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science.

Morningside Park (Manhattan)

Morningside ParkMorningside Park (New York City)Morningside Parks
On April 23, 1968, more than 1,000 students forcefully occupied five campus buildings in protest to the proposed expansion of the university's campus into Morningside Park and to protest the university's sponsorship of classified military research.
Furthermore, the Bloomingside Asylum moved out of the area in 1888 after protests about the asylum's presence, and three colleges moved to the site: Columbia College (now part of Columbia University), Teachers College, and Barnard College.

Brander Matthews

MatthewsMatthews, BranderJames Brander Matthews
Academics listed include philosophers Mortimer Adler and Irwin Edman, historians Jacques Barzun and Alfred Thayer Mahan, economist Arthur Burns, paleontologist Niles Eldredge, drama scholar Brander Matthews, art historian Meyer Schapiro and literary critic Lionel Trilling.
Matthews born to a wealthy family in New Orleans, grew up in New York City, and graduated from Columbia College in 1871, where he was a member of the Philolexian Society and the fraternity of Delta Psi, and from Columbia Law School in 1873.

Robert Troup

Along with Nicholas Fish, Robert Troup, and a group of other students from King's College, he joined a volunteer militia company called the "Hearts of Oak" and achieved the rank of Lieutenant.
Troup served as a trustee of Columbia College from 1811 to 1817, and was a member of the Society of the Cincinnati.

John Jay Hall

John Jay
First-year students are housed on the main quad in John Jay, Carman, Wallach, Hartley and Furnald Halls.
The building includes freshman housing for students of Columbia College and the Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science; John Jay Dining Hall, the university's primary undergraduate dining facility; JJ's Place, an underground student quick service restaurant serving burgers and gourmet sandwiches among other things; the university's health services center; and an elegant wood-paneled lounge.

John Purroy Mitchel

John P. MitchelMayor John MitchelMitchel
Other political figures in this group include statesman and educator Nicholas Murray Butler, New York Governor DeWitt Clinton, U.S. Secretary of State Hamilton Fish, South African anti-apartheid leader Pixley ka Isaka Seme, Chinese diplomat Wellington Koo, many New York City mayors, including Seth Low and John Purroy Mitchel, as well as spymaster William Joseph Donovan.
He obtained his bachelor's degree from Columbia College in 1899 and graduated from New York Law School in 1902 with honors.

Jacques Barzun

Barzun, JacquesBarzunBarzun J. M.
Academics listed include philosophers Mortimer Adler and Irwin Edman, historians Jacques Barzun and Alfred Thayer Mahan, economist Arthur Burns, paleontologist Niles Eldredge, drama scholar Brander Matthews, art historian Meyer Schapiro and literary critic Lionel Trilling.
As an undergraduate at Columbia College, Barzun was drama critic for the Columbia Daily Spectator, a prize-winning president of the Philolexian Society, the Columbia literary and debate club, and valedictorian of the class of 1927.