A report on Columbia University

Coat of arms
Coat of arms
Samuel Johnson, the first president of Columbia
King's College Hall, 1790
Crop of 1797 Taylor map of NYC showing "The College" at its Park Place (then Robinson Street) location. Note earlier location, Trinity Church, lower left.
The Gothic Revival library and law school buildings on the Madison Avenue campus
Low Memorial Library, c. 1900
Alma Mater
College Walk
Butler Library
Union Theological Seminary
Lamont Campus entrance in Palisades, New York
The entrance to the College of Physicians and Surgeons in Washington Heights
Access to Columbia is enhanced by the 116th Street–Columbia University subway station on the IRT Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line.
Van Amringe Quadrangle and Memorial
Low Memorial Library
The Barnard College Class of 1913 processes down the steps of Low Library.
Havemeyer Hall, a National Historic Chemical Landmark, where deuterium was discovered in 1931. Research conducted in Havemeyer has led to at least seven Nobel Prizes.
President Lee Bollinger presents the 2003 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction to Jeffrey Eugenides.
Copies of the Columbia Daily Spectator being sold during the 1962–63 New York City newspaper strike
The Art Deco cover of the November 1931 edition of the Jester, celebrating the opening of the George Washington Bridge
Pupin Hall, the physics building, showing the rooftop Rutherfurd Observatory
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World Leaders Forum at Low Memorial Library
Earl Hall was listed on the National Register of Historic Places for its role in serving as a venue for meetings and dances of the Columbia Queer Alliance.
The Columbia University Marching Band in 2018
Alexander Hamilton: Founding Father of the United States; author of The Federalist Papers; first United States Secretary of the Treasury — King's College
John Jay: Founding Father of the United States; author of The Federalist Papers; first Chief Justice of the United States; second Governor of New York — King's College
Robert R. Livingston: Founding Father of the United States; drafter of the Declaration of Independence; first United States Secretary of Foreign Affairs — King's College
Gouverneur Morris: Founding Father of the United States; author of the United States Constitution; United States Senator from New York — King's College
DeWitt Clinton: United States Senator from New York; sixth Governor of New York; responsible for construction of Erie Canal — Columbia College
Barack Obama: 44th President of the United States; United States Senator from Illinois; Nobel laureate — Columbia College
Franklin D. Roosevelt: 32nd President of the United States; 44th Governor of New York — Columbia Law School
Theodore Roosevelt: 26th President of the United States; 25th Vice President of the United States; 33rd Governor of New York; Nobel laureate – Columbia Law School
Wellington Koo: acting President of the Republic of China; judge of the International Court of Justice — Columbia College, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
B. R. Ambedkar: Founding Father of India; architect of the Constitution of India; First Minister of Law and Justice — Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
Ruth Bader Ginsburg: Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States — Columbia Law School
Neil Gorsuch: Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States — Columbia College
Charles Evans Hughes: 11th Chief Justice of the United States; 44th United States Secretary of State; 35th Governor of New York — Columbia Law School
Harlan Fiske Stone: 12th Chief Justice of the United States; 52nd United States Attorney General — Columbia Law School
William Barr: 77th and 85th United States Attorney General – Columbia College, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
Hamilton Fish: 26th United States Secretary of State; United States Senator from New York; 16th Governor of New York — Columbia College
Madeleine Albright: 64th United States Secretary of State; first female Secretary of State — School of International and Public Affairs
Frances Perkins: fourth United States Secretary of Labor; first female member of any U.S. Cabinet — Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
Robert A. Millikan: Nobel laureate; measured the elementary electric charge — Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
Isidor Isaac Rabi: Nobel Laureate; discovered nuclear magnetic resonance — Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
Julian S. Schwinger: Nobel laureate; pioneer of quantum field theory — Columbia College, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
Milton Friedman: Nobel laureate, leading member of the Chicago school of economics — Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
Simon Kuznets: Nobel laureate; invented concept of GDP; Milton Friedman's doctoral advisor — School of General Studies, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
Alan Greenspan: 13th Chair of the Federal Reserve — Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
Warren Buffett: CEO of Berkshire Hathaway; one of the world's wealthiest people — Columbia Business School
Herman Hollerith: inventor; co-founder of IBM – School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
Robert Kraft: billionaire; owner of the New England Patriots; chairman and CEO of the Kraft Group — Columbia College
Richard Rodgers: legendary Emmy, Grammy, Oscar, and Tony award-winning composer; Pulitzer Prize winner — Columbia College
Langston Hughes: Harlem Renaissance poet, novelist, and playwright — School of Engineering and Applied Science
Zora Neale Hurston: Harlem Renaissance author, anthropologist, and filmmaker — Barnard College, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
Allen Ginsberg: poet; founder of the Beat Generation — Columbia College
Jack Kerouac: poet; founder of the Beat Generation — Columbia College
Isaac Asimov: science fiction writer; biochemist — School of General Studies, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
J. D. Salinger: novelist, The Catcher in the Rye — School of General Studies
Amelia Earhart: first female aviator to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean — School of General Studies
Jake Gyllenhaal: actor and film producer — Columbia College
Zbigniew Brzezinski
Sonia Sotomayor
Kimberlé Crenshaw
Lee Bollinger
Franz Boas
Margaret Mead
Edward Sapir
John Dewey
Charles A. Beard
Max Horkheimer
Herbert Marcuse
Edward Said
Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak
Orhan Pamuk
Edwin Howard Armstrong
Enrico Fermi
Chien-Shiung Wu
Tsung-Dao Lee
Jack Steinberger
Joachim Frank
Joseph Stiglitz
Jeffrey Sachs
Robert Mundell
Thomas Hunt Morgan
Eric Kandel
Richard Axel
Andrei Okounkov

Private Ivy League research university in New York City.

- Columbia University
Coat of arms

264 related topics with Alpha

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Columbia College (New York)

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College Hall in 1790
Hamilton Hall (left), new home of Columbia College, and Hartley Hall, the College's first dormitory, in 1907
Van Amringe Quadrangle houses a memorial to John Howard Van Amringe, who served as the College's first dean after the formation of Columbia University
Hamilton Hall, home of the College, on the campus of Columbia University.
Alexander Hamilton: Founding Father of the United States; author of The Federalist Papers; 1st United States Secretary of the Treasury
John Jay: Founding Father of the United States; author of The Federalist Papers; 1st Chief Justice of the United States; 2nd Governor of New York
Gouverneur Morris: Founding Father of the United States; author of the United States Constitution; United States Senator from New York
Robert R. Livingston, Founding Father of the United States, member of the Committee of Five, and the first United States Secretary of Foreign Affairs, negotiator of the Louisiana Purchase
Egbert Benson, Founding Father of the United States, 1st Attorney General of New York
Hamilton Fish: 26th United States Secretary of State; United States Senator from New York; 16th Governor of New York
Daniel D. Tompkins, fourth governor of New York from 1807 to 1817, and the sixth vice president of the United States from 1817 to 1825
Barack Obama: 44th President of the United States; United States Senator from Illinois; Nobel laureate
Neil Gorsuch, Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States
William Barr: 77th and 85th United States Attorney General
Eric Holder: 82nd United States Attorney General
Arthur F. Burns, 10th Chairman of the Federal Reserve and former U.S. Ambassador to West Germany
Harold Brown, 14th U.S. Secretary of Defense, 8th United States Secretary of the Air Force and 3rd president of the California Institute of Technology
Julian S. Schwinger: Nobel laureate; pioneer of quantum field theory; one of the greatest physicists of the 20th century
Robert Kraft: Owner, Chairman, CEO of the New England Patriots; billionaire
Lou Gehrig: Triple Crown winner; 2x MLB Most Valuable Player; 6x World Series Champion; member of Baseball Hall of Fame
Oscar Hammerstein II: 8x Tony Award winner; 2x Academy Award winner
Richard Rodgers: legendary Emmy, Grammy, Oscar, and Tony award-winning composer; Pulitzer Prize winner
Jack Kerouac, Beat Generation author
Allen Ginsberg, leading figure of the Beat Generation
Maggie Gyllenhaal, Golden Globe-winning actress
Julia Stiles, Golden Globe-nominated actress
Anna Paquin, Academy Award-winning actress
Kate McKinnon, Emmy Award-winning actress, Saturday Night Live
Alicia Keys, singer and songwriter, 15x Grammy Award winner
alt=|Joshua Lederberg, biologist, winner of the 1953 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine
alt=|Leon Cooper, physicist, winner of the 1972 Nobel Prize in Physics
alt=|Richard Axel, biologist, winner of the 2004 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine
alt=|Robert Lefkowitz, biochemist, winner of the 2012 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine
alt=|Arthur Ashkin, winner of the Nobel Prize in Physics in 2018
alt=|Timothee Chalamet, Academy Award-nominated actor
alt=|Jake Gyllenhaal, Academy Award-nominated actor

Columbia College is the oldest undergraduate college of Columbia University, situated on the university's main campus in Morningside Heights in the borough of Manhattan in New York City.

Morningside Heights, Manhattan

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Neighborhood on the West Side of Upper Manhattan in New York City.

Neighborhood on the West Side of Upper Manhattan in New York City.

Bloomingdale Insane Asylum circa 1831
Until 1903, the Ninth Avenue elevated bypassed Morningside Heights (depicted in background)
Morningside Park, which was the neighborhood's namesake
Low Memorial Library
The Colosseum, built by the Paterno Brothers in 1910
The area, circa 1926
Grant Houses, one of the redevelopment projects in Morningside Heights in the 1950s
From the Hudson River
Broadway at dusk
The real Tom's Restaurant, which appeared in Seinfeld
FDNY Engine Company 47
Mount Sinai Morningside
The Cathedral School of St. John the Divine
Cathedral Parkway–110th Street station

A large portion of Morningside Heights is part of the campus of Columbia University, a private Ivy League university.

Manhattan

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Most densely populated and geographically smallest of the five boroughs of New York City.

Most densely populated and geographically smallest of the five boroughs of New York City.

Peter Minuit, early 1600s
Pieter Schaghen's 1626 letter saying Manhattan was purchased for 60 guilders.
The Castello Plan showing the Dutch city of New Amsterdam in 1660, at the southern tip of Manhattan
Washington's statue in front of Federal Hall on Wall Street, where in 1789 he was sworn in as first U.S. president
Manhattan in 1873. The Brooklyn Bridge was under construction from 1870 until 1883
The "Sanitary & Topographical Map of the City and Island of New York", commonly known as the Viele Map, was created by Egbert Ludovicus Viele in 1865
Manhattan's Little Italy, Lower East Side, circa 1900
Manhattan personified, early 20th century
V-J Day in Times Square in Times Square, 1945
Flooding on Avenue C caused by Hurricane Sandy on October 29, 2012
Satellite image of Manhattan Island, bounded by the Hudson River to the west, the Harlem River to the north, the East River to the east, and New York Harbor to the south, with rectangular Central Park prominently visible. Roosevelt Island, in the East River, belongs to Manhattan.
Location of Manhattan (red) within New York City (remainder yellow)
Manhattan schist outcropping in Central Park
Liberty Island is an exclave of Manhattan, of New York City, and of New York State, that is surrounded by New Jersey waters
The Empire State Building in the foreground looking southward from the top of Rockefeller Center, with One World Trade Center in the background, at sunset. The Midtown South Community Council acts as a civic caretaker for much of the neighborhood between the skyscrapers of Midtown and Lower Manhattan.
Central Park in autumn
The Estonian House, the main center of Estonian culture amongst Estonian Americans
A. T. Stewart in 1870, 9th Street, Manhattan
Many tall buildings have setbacks on their facade due to the 1916 Zoning Resolution. This is exemplified at Park Avenue and 57th Street in Midtown Manhattan.
The New York Stock Exchange, by a significant margin the world's largest stock exchange per market capitalization of its listed companies, at US$23.1 trillion as of April 2018.
The Financial District of Lower Manhattan, seen from Brooklyn
The Flatiron District is the center and birthplace of Silicon Alley
Times Square is the hub of the Broadway theater district and a major cultural venue in Manhattan, it also has one of the highest annual attendance rates of any tourist attraction in the world, estimated at 50 million
The New York Times headquarters, 620 Eighth Avenue
Butler Library at Columbia University, with its notable architectural design
Stuyvesant High School, in Tribeca
New York Public Library Main Branch at 42nd Street and Fifth Avenue
Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts
The scene at Manhattan's 2015 LGBT Pride March. The annual event rivals the sister São Paulo event as the world's largest pride parade, attracting tens of thousands of participants and millions of sidewalk spectators each June.
The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Madison Square Garden is home to the Rangers and Knicks, and hosts some Liberty games
The Skating Pond in Central Park, 1862
Manhattan Municipal Building
James Farley Post Office
A slum tour through the Five Points in an 1885 sketch
Tenement houses in 1936
At the time of its construction, London Terrace in Chelsea was the largest apartment building in the world
Grand Central Terminal is a National Historic Landmark.
Ferries departing Battery Park City and helicopters flying above Manhattan
The Staten Island Ferry, seen from the Battery, crosses Upper New York Bay, providing free public transportation between Staten Island and Manhattan.
The Brooklyn Bridge to the right and the Manhattan Bridge towards the left, are two of the three bridges that connect Lower Manhattan with Brooklyn over the East River.
Eighth Avenue, looking northward ("Uptown"), in the rain; most streets and avenues in Manhattan's grid plan incorporate a one-way traffic configuration
Tourists looking westward at sunset to observe the July 12, 2016 Manhattanhenge
Ferry service departing Battery Park City towards New Jersey, see from Paulus Hook

Numerous colleges and universities are located in Manhattan, including Columbia University, New York University, Cornell Tech, Weill Cornell Medical College, and Rockefeller University, which have been ranked among the top 40 in the world.

Barnard College

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Private women's liberal arts college located in the borough of Manhattan in New York City.

Private women's liberal arts college located in the borough of Manhattan in New York City.

Sian Beilock, current president of Barnard
Martha Stewart '63, businesswoman and television personality
Lauren Graham '88, actress and author
Joan Rivers '55, comedian and actress
Greta Gerwig '06, filmmaker
Norma Merrick Sklarek '50, architect
Grace Lee Boggs '35, author, social activist, philosopher
Maria Hinojosa '85, journalist, activist
Helene D. Gayle '76, physician, public health official
Ntozake Shange '70, playwright, poet, author
Laurie Anderson '69, performance artist and NASA's first Artist-in-Residence
Jacqueline K. Barton '74, pioneer in the study of DNA structure
Jhumpa Lahiri '89, author
Margaret Mead '23, anthropologist
Cynthia Nixon '88, actor, politician
Twyla Tharp '63, choreographer
Zora Neale Hurston '28, author
Katherine Boo '88, journalist and recipient of the Pulitzer and MacArthur Foundation prizes
The Milstein Center for Teaching and Learning

It was founded in 1889 by a group of women led by young student activist Annie Nathan Meyer, who petitioned Columbia University's trustees to create an affiliated college named after Columbia's recently deceased 10th president, Frederick A.P. Barnard.

The Trinity test of the Manhattan Project on 16 July 1945 was the first detonation of a nuclear weapon.

Manhattan Project

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Research and development undertaking during World War II that produced the first nuclear weapons.

Research and development undertaking during World War II that produced the first nuclear weapons.

The Trinity test of the Manhattan Project on 16 July 1945 was the first detonation of a nuclear weapon.
Enrico Fermi, John R. Dunning, and Dana P. Mitchell in front of the cyclotron in the basement of Pupin Hall at Columbia University
March 1940 meeting at Berkeley, California: Ernest O. Lawrence, Arthur H. Compton, Vannevar Bush, James B. Conant, Karl T. Compton, and Alfred L. Loomis
Different fission bomb assembly methods explored during the July 1942 conference
Manhattan Project Organization Chart, 1 May 1946
Oppenheimer and Groves at the remains of the Trinity test in September 1945, two months after the test blast and just after the end of World War II. The white overshoes prevented fallout from sticking to the soles of their shoes.
Groves confers with James Chadwick, the head of the British Mission.
Shift change at the Y-12 uranium enrichment facility at the Clinton Engineer Works in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, on 11 August 1945. By May 1945, 82,000 people were employed at the Clinton Engineer Works. Photograph by the Manhattan District photographer Ed Westcott.
Physicists at a Manhattan District-sponsored colloquium at the Los Alamos Laboratory on the Super in April 1946. In the front row are Norris Bradbury, John Manley, Enrico Fermi and J. (Jerome) M. B. Kellogg (1905-1981). Robert Oppenheimer, in dark coat, is behind Manley; to Oppenheimer's left is Richard Feynman. The Army officer on the left is Colonel Oliver Haywood.
Map of Los Alamos site, New Mexico, 1943–45
Hanford workers collect their paychecks at the Western Union office.
The majority of the uranium used in the Manhattan Project came from the Shinkolobwe mine in Belgian Congo.
Oak Ridge hosted several uranium separation technologies. The Y-12 electromagnetic separation plant is in the upper right. The K-25 and K-27 gaseous diffusion plants are in the lower left, near the S-50 thermal diffusion plant. The X-10 was for plutonium production.
Alpha I racetrack at Y-12
Calutron Girls were young women who monitored calutron control panels at Y-12. Gladys Owens, seated in the foreground, was unaware of what she had been involved in.
Oak Ridge K-25 plant
The S-50 plant is the dark building to the upper left behind the Oak Ridge powerhouse (with smoke stacks).
Workers load uranium slugs into the X-10 Graphite Reactor.
Aerial view of Hanford B-Reactor site, June 1944
Map of the Hanford Site. Railroads flank the plants to the north and south. Reactors are the three northernmost red squares, along the Columbia River. The separation plants are the lower two red squares from the grouping south of the reactors. The bottom red square is the 300 area.
A row of Thin Man casings. Fat Man casings are visible in the background.
An implosion-type nuclear bomb
Remote handling of a kilocurie source of radiolanthanum for a RaLa Experiment at Los Alamos
The explosives of "the gadget" were raised to the top of the tower for the final assembly.
The Trinity test of the Manhattan Project was the first detonation of a nuclear weapon.
Major General Leslie R. Groves, Jr., speaks to service personnel Oak Ridge Tennessee in August 1945.
A billboard encouraging secrecy among Oak Ridge workers
Security poster, warning office workers to close drawers and put documents in safes when not being used
Allied soldiers dismantle the German experimental nuclear reactor at Haigerloch.
Silverplate B-29 Straight Flush. The tail code of the 444th Bombardment Group is painted on for security reasons.
Little Boy explodes over Hiroshima, Japan, 6 August 1945 (left);
Fat Man explodes over Nagasaki, Japan, 9 August 1945 (right).
Presentation of the Army–Navy "E" Award at Los Alamos on 16 October 1945. Standing, left to right: J. Robert Oppenheimer, unidentified, unidentified, Kenneth Nichols, Leslie Groves, Robert Gordon Sproul, William Sterling Parsons.
President Harry S. Truman signs the Atomic Energy Act of 1946, establishing the United States Atomic Energy Commission.
The Lake Ontario Ordnance Works (LOOW) near Niagara Falls became a principal repository for Manhattan Project waste for the Eastern United States. All of the radioactive materials stored at the LOOW site—including thorium, uranium, and the world's largest concentration of radium-226—were buried in an "Interim Waste Containment Structure" (in the foreground) in 1991.
A "bomb" (pressure vessel) containing uranium halide and sacrificial metal, probably magnesium, being lowered into a furnace
After the reaction, the interior of a bomb coated with remnant slag
A uranium metal "biscuit" from the reduction reaction

In February 1940, the U.S. Navy awarded Columbia University $6,000 in funding, most of which Enrico Fermi and Szilard spent on purchasing graphite.

New York City

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Most populous city in the United States.

Most populous city in the United States.

New Amsterdam, centered in the eventual Lower Manhattan, in 1664, the year England took control and renamed it "New York"
Fort George and the City of New York c. 1731. Royal Navy ships of the line are seen guarding what would become New York Harbor.
Columbia University was founded by royal charter in 1754 under the name of King's College.
The Battle of Long Island, the largest battle of the American Revolution, took place in Brooklyn in 1776.
Broadway follows the Native American Wickquasgeck Trail through Manhattan.
The current 5 boroughs of Greater New York as they appeared in 1814. Bronx was in Westchester County, Queens County included modern Nassau County, Kings County had 6 towns, one of which was Brooklyn, New York City is shown by hatching in southern New York County on the island of Manhattan, and Richmond County on Staten Island.
A construction worker atop the Empire State Building as it was being built in 1930. The Chrysler Building is behind him.
Manhattan's Little Italy, Lower East Side, circa 1900
The Stonewall Inn in Greenwich Village, a designated U.S. National Historic Landmark and National Monument, as the site of the June 1969 Stonewall riots and the cradle of the modern gay rights movement
United Airlines Flight 175 hits the South Tower of the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001.
The core of the New York City metropolitan area, with Manhattan Island at its center
Lower and Midtown Manhattan, as seen by a SkySat satellite in 2017
Central Park in Winter by Raymond Speers, in Munsey's Magazine, February 1900
Flushing Meadows–Corona Park was used in both the 1939 and 1964 New York World's Fair, with the Unisphere as the centerpiece of the latter and which remains today.
The Statue of Liberty on Liberty Island in New York Harbor is a symbol of the United States and its ideals of freedom, democracy, and opportunity.
View of The Pond and Midtown Manhattan from the Gapstow Bridge in Central Park, one of the world's most visited tourist attractions, in 2019
California sea lions play at the Bronx Zoo, the world's largest metropolitan zoo.
A map of racial distribution in New York, 2010 U.S. census. Each dot is 25 people:
The landmark Neo-Gothic Roman Catholic St. Patrick's Cathedral, Midtown Manhattan
Ultra-Orthodox Jewish residents in Brooklyn. Brooklyn has the largest Jewish community in the United States, with approximately 600,000 individuals.
The Islamic Cultural Center of New York in Upper Manhattan was the first mosque built in New York City.
Ganesh Temple in Flushing, Queens, is the oldest Hindu temple in the Western Hemisphere.
The New York Stock Exchange, by a significant margin the world's largest stock exchange per market capitalization of its listed companies, at US$23.1 trillion as of April 2018. Pictured is the exchange's building on Wall Street.
The Deutsche Bank Center as viewed from Central Park West
Times Square is the hub of the Broadway theater district and a media center. It also has one of the highest annual attendance rates of any tourist attraction in the world, estimated at 50 million.
The I Love New York logo, designed by Milton Glaser in 1977
Rockefeller Center is home to NBC Studios.
Times Square Studios, home of Good Morning America
Butler Library at Columbia University, described as one of the most beautiful college libraries in the United States
The Washington Square Arch, an unofficial icon of both New York University (NYU) and its Greenwich Village neighborhood
New York-Presbyterian Hospital, affiliated with Columbia University and Cornell University, the largest hospital and largest private employer in New York City and one of the world's busiest
The New York Police Department (NYPD) is the largest police force in the United States.
Police officers of New York Police Department (NYPD)
The Fire Department of New York (FDNY) is the largest municipal fire department in the United States.
The Stephen A. Schwarzman Headquarters Building of the New York Public Library, at 5th Avenue and 42nd Street
The fast-paced streets of New York City, January 2020
Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, part of Museum Mile, is one of the largest museums in the world.
Smorgasburg opened in 2011 as an open-air food market and is part of the Brooklyn Flea.
As of 2012, the city had about 6,000 hybrid taxis (shown) in service, the largest number of any city in North America.
New York City Hall is the oldest City Hall in the United States that still houses its original governmental functions.
The New York County Courthouse houses the New York Supreme Court and other offices.
Eric Adams, the current and 110th Mayor of New York City
New York City is home to the two busiest train stations in the U.S., including Grand Central Terminal.
The New York City Subway is the world's largest rapid transit system by number of stations.
The Port Authority Bus Terminal, the world's busiest bus station, at 8th Avenue and 42nd Street
John F. Kennedy Airport in Queens, the busiest international air passenger gateway to the United States
The Staten Island Ferry shuttles commuters between Manhattan and Staten Island.
Yellow medallion taxicabs are widely recognized icons of the city.
8th Avenue, looking northward ("uptown"). Most streets and avenues in Manhattan's grid plan incorporate a one-way traffic configuration.
The George Washington Bridge, connecting Upper Manhattan (background) from Fort Lee, New Jersey across the Hudson River, is the world's busiest motor vehicle bridge.
The growing skyline of Long Island City, Queens (background),<ref>{{cite web|url=https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-10-30/nyc-s-fastest-growing-neighborhood-gets-180-million-investment|title=NYC's Fastest-Growing Neighborhood Gets $180 Million Investment|first=Henry|last=Goldman|date=October 30, 2018|publisher=Bloomberg L.P|access-date=October 30, 2018}}</ref> facing the East River and Manhattan in May 2017
The Grand Concourse in the Bronx, foreground, with Manhattan in the background in February 2018
St. George, Staten Island as seen from the Staten Island Ferry, the world's busiest passenger-only ferry system, shuttling passengers between Manhattan and Staten Island
The Asia gate entrance to the Bronx Zoo, the world's largest metropolitan zoo.
The Spanish Harlem Orchestra. New York City is home to nearly 3 million Latino Americans, the largest Hispanic population of any city outside Latin America and Spain.
The Financial District of Lower Manhattan including Wall Street, the world's principal financial center

The city has over 120 colleges and universities, including Columbia University, New York University, and the City University of New York system, which is the largest urban public university system in the United States.

Low Memorial Library

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The stairs leading to Low are a popular meeting area for Columbia students and are also used for commencements, speeches, and other events.
South elevation, from the upper stories of Butler Library
Frieze inscription
Trustees' room
The final plan for Low Library, published in Harper's Weekly in 1894 on the eve of the building's construction
A modern view of the rotunda, showing the interior pillars made of polished green Vermont granite and crowned with Greek Ionic capitals of gilt bronze
Low Library shortly following its completion in 1897
Low Library, c. 1902–05
The 1954 Columbia University bicentennial stamp, depicting Low Library
A student snowboards down Low Steps during the winter.

The Low Memorial Library (nicknamed Low) is a building on the campus of Columbia University in Morningside Heights, Manhattan, New York City, United States.

Butler Library

Butler Library

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Butler Library
The 1954 unveiling of a 12-foot stained-glass window depicting Peter Stuyvesant, located in Butler 209, given to the university by the Netherlands Antillean government in celebration of the 300th anniversary of the founding of New Amsterdam
Butler Library within the architectural context of the surrounding McKim, Mead & White buildings
The Lawrence A. Wien Reference Room, the main reading room of Butler Library
The Butler Library colonnade, above which are the names inscribed on the building's frieze
The library lobby

Butler Library is located on the Morningside Heights campus of Columbia University at 535 West 114th Street, in Manhattan, New York City.

John Dunning grave North Cemetery Sherman, Fairfield County, Connecticut

John R. Dunning

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American physicist who played key roles in the Manhattan Project that developed the first atomic bombs.

American physicist who played key roles in the Manhattan Project that developed the first atomic bombs.

John Dunning grave North Cemetery Sherman, Fairfield County, Connecticut
The cyclotron built by Dunning in 1939, in the Pupin Hall physics building basement at Columbia University. Dunning (left) is with Enrico Fermi (center) and Dana P. Mitchell (right)
John R. Dunning (left) and Hubert Thelen (right) – first cousins, March 1957 after funeral of John's father A.C. Dunning.

He was Dean of the School of Engineering and Applied Science at Columbia University from 1950 to 1969.

Columbia University protests of 1968

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In 1968, a series of protests at Columbia University in New York City were one among the various student demonstrations that occurred around the globe in that year.