Coma Berenices

ComComa Berenices constellationComaComa Berenices (constellation)
Coma Berenices is an ancient asterism in the northern sky which has been defined as one of the 88 modern constellations.wikipedia
372 Related Articles

Coma Star Cluster

Collinder 256ComaComa Berenices cluster
They form a 45-degree triangle, from which Berenice's imaginary tresses, formed by the Coma Star Cluster, hang.
The Coma Star Cluster in Coma Berenices, designated Melotte 111 after its entry in the catalogue of star clusters by P. J. Melotte, is a small but nearby star cluster in our galaxy, containing about 40 brighter stars (magnitude 5 to 10) with a common proper motion.

Berenice II of Egypt

Berenice IIBereniceQueen Berenice
Its name means "Berenice's Hair" in Latin and refers to Queen Berenice II of Egypt, who sacrificed her long hair as a votive offering.
She is best-known for an episode of court propaganda, which led to the constellation Coma Berenices being named after her.

Alpha Comae Berenices

α ComDiadem (star)α Com (Diadem)
The constellation's major stars are Alpha Comae Berenices, Beta Comae Berenices and Gamma Comae Berenices.
Alpha Comae Berenices (α Comae Berenices, abbreviated Alpha Com, α Com) is a binary star in the constellation of Coma Berenices (Berenice's Hair), 17.8 pc away.

Conon of Samos

Conon
It was introduced to Western astronomy during the third century BC by Conon of Samos and was further corroborated as a constellation by Gerardus Mercator and Tycho Brahe.
He is primarily remembered for naming the constellation Coma Berenices.

Malin 1

Galaxy Malin 1, in the constellation, is the first-known giant low-surface-brightness galaxy.
It is located 366 Mpc away in the constellation Coma Berenices, near the North Galactic Pole.

Coma Cluster

ComaComa cluster of galaxies1656
Coma Berenices contains the North Galactic Pole and one of the richest known galaxy clusters, the Coma Cluster, part of the Coma Supercluster.
It is located in and takes its name from the constellation Coma Berenices.

Gamma Comae Berenices

γ Com
The constellation's major stars are Alpha Comae Berenices, Beta Comae Berenices and Gamma Comae Berenices.
Gamma Comae Berenices, Latinized from γ Comae Berenices, is a single, orange-hued star in the northern constellation of Coma Berenices.

Beta Comae Berenices

β Comβ Comae Berenices
The constellation's major stars are Alpha Comae Berenices, Beta Comae Berenices and Gamma Comae Berenices.
Beta Comae Berenices (β Comae Berenices, β Com) is a main sequence dwarf star in the northern constellation of Coma Berenices.

Leo (constellation)

LeoLeoneLeo constellation
It is located in the fourth galactic quadrant, between Leo and Boötes, and is visible in both hemispheres.
Modern astronomers, including Tycho Brahe in 1602, excised a group of stars that once made up the "tuft" of the lion's tail and used them to form the new constellation Coma Berenices (Berenice's hair), although there was precedent for that designation among the ancient Greeks and Romans.

IAU designated constellations

88 modern constellations88 constellationsmodern constellation
Coma Berenices is the only modern constellation named for a historic person.
Some ancient asterisms, for example Coma Berenices, Serpens, and portions of Argo Navis, are now officially constellations.

Boötes

BootesBoötes constellationBoo
It is located in the fourth galactic quadrant, between Leo and Boötes, and is visible in both hemispheres.
However, it has also been associated with three stars in Coma Berenices.

Coma Berenices in Chinese astronomy

Coma BerenicesComa Berenices (Chinese astronomy)In Chinese astronomy
In Chinese astronomy, the stars making up Coma Berenices were in two areas: the Supreme Palace enclosure and the Azure Dragon of the East.
The modern constellation Coma Berenices lies across one of the quadrants symbolized by the Azure Dragon of the East (東方青龍, Dōng Fāng Qīng Lóng), and Three Enclosures (三垣, Sān Yuán), that divide the sky in traditional Chinese uranography.

SN 1940B

Supernova SN 1940B was the first observed example of a type II supernova, while the star FK Comae Berenices is the prototype of an eponymous class of variable stars.
SN 1940B was a supernova discovered on 5 May 1940 in the galaxy NGC 4725 in Coma Berenices.

21 Comae Berenices

21 Com
In Arabic astronomy Coma Berenices was known as Al-Dafira and Al-Hulba (translations of Ptolemaic Plokamos), forming the tuft of the constellation Leo and including most of the Flamsteed-designated stars (particularly 12, 13, 14, 16, 17, 18 and 21 Comae Berenices).
21 Comae Berenices is a variable star in the northern constellation of Coma Berenices.

12 Comae Berenices

12 Com1212 Com A
In Arabic astronomy Coma Berenices was known as Al-Dafira and Al-Hulba (translations of Ptolemaic Plokamos), forming the tuft of the constellation Leo and including most of the Flamsteed-designated stars (particularly 12, 13, 14, 16, 17, 18 and 21 Comae Berenices).
12 Comae Berenices is a binary star system in the northern constellation of Coma Berenices.

14 Comae Berenices

14 Com14
In Arabic astronomy Coma Berenices was known as Al-Dafira and Al-Hulba (translations of Ptolemaic Plokamos), forming the tuft of the constellation Leo and including most of the Flamsteed-designated stars (particularly 12, 13, 14, 16, 17, 18 and 21 Comae Berenices).
14 Comae Berenices is a single star in the northern constellation of Coma Berenices, and is the second brightest member of the Coma Star Cluster.

16 Comae Berenices

16 Com16
In Arabic astronomy Coma Berenices was known as Al-Dafira and Al-Hulba (translations of Ptolemaic Plokamos), forming the tuft of the constellation Leo and including most of the Flamsteed-designated stars (particularly 12, 13, 14, 16, 17, 18 and 21 Comae Berenices).
16 Comae Berenices is a single star in the northern constellation of Coma Berenices.

23 Comae Berenices

23 Com
Ulugh Beg, however, regarded Al-Dafira as consisting of two stars, 7 and 23 Comae Berenices.
23 Comae Berenices is a binary star system in the northern constellation of Coma Berenices, situated a few degrees away from the North Galactic Pole.

13 Comae Berenices

13 Com13
In Arabic astronomy Coma Berenices was known as Al-Dafira and Al-Hulba (translations of Ptolemaic Plokamos), forming the tuft of the constellation Leo and including most of the Flamsteed-designated stars (particularly 12, 13, 14, 16, 17, 18 and 21 Comae Berenices).
13 Comae Berenices is a probable binary star system in the northern constellation of Coma Berenices.

Ursa Major

Great BearOrsa MaggioreUrsa Major constellation
The people of the Pukapuka atoll may have called it Te Yiku-o-te-kiole, although sometimes this name is associated with Ursa Major.
Ursa Major borders eight other constellations: Draco to the north and northeast, Boötes to the east, Canes Venatici to the east and southeast, Coma Berenices to the southeast, Leo and Leo Minor to the south, Lynx to the southwest and Camelopardalis to the northwest.

7 Comae Berenices

7 Com7
Ulugh Beg, however, regarded Al-Dafira as consisting of two stars, 7 and 23 Comae Berenices.
7 Comae Berenices is a single star located 249 light years away in the northern constellation of Coma Berenices.

Supreme Palace enclosure

Left Wall of Supreme Palace EnclosureRight Wall of Supreme Palace EnclosureImperial Guards
In Chinese astronomy, the stars making up Coma Berenices were in two areas: the Supreme Palace enclosure and the Azure Dragon of the East.

Coma Supercluster

Coma
Coma Berenices contains the North Galactic Pole and one of the richest known galaxy clusters, the Coma Cluster, part of the Coma Supercluster.
It is located in the constellation Coma Berenices.

24 Comae Berenices

24 Com24 Com A
There are over thirty double stars in Coma Berenices, including 24 Comae Berenices with contrasting colors.
24 Comae Berenices is a triple star system in the northern constellation of Coma Berenices.

Callimachus

BattiadesCall.Callimachus of Cyrene
Modern scholars are uncertain if Berenice made the sacrifice before or after Ptolemy's return; it was suggested that it happened after Ptolemy's return (around March–June or May 245 BC), when Conon presented the asterism jointly with scholar and poet Callimachus during a public evening ceremony.
One passage of the Aetia, the so-called Coma Berenices, has been reconstructed from papyrus remains and the celebrated Latin adaptation of Catullus (Catullus 66).