Combating Online Infringement and Counterfeits Act

COICA
United States Senate Bill S.3804, known as the Combating Online Infringement and Counterfeits Act (COICA) was a bill introduced by Senator Patrick Leahy (D-VT) on September 20, 2010.wikipedia
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Patrick Leahy

Patrick J. LeahySenator Patrick LeahyLeahy
United States Senate Bill S.3804, known as the Combating Online Infringement and Counterfeits Act (COICA) was a bill introduced by Senator Patrick Leahy (D-VT) on September 20, 2010.
On September 20, 2010, Leahy introduced the Combating Online Infringement and Counterfeits Act, Senate Bill S. 3804, which would allow the court to issue a restraining order or injunction against Internet domain names which infringe upon copyright.

Demand Progress

It was opposed by organizations and individuals such as Center for Democracy and Technology, the Electronic Frontier Foundation, Demand Progress, the Distributed Computing Industry Association, Tim Berners-Lee, the American Civil Liberties Union and Human Rights Watch.
The organization was founded through a petition in opposition to the Combating Online Infringement and Counterfeits Act, sparking the movement that eventually defeated COICA's successor bills, the Stop Online Piracy Act and the PROTECT IP Act, two highly controversial pieces of United States legislation.

PROTECT IP Act

PIPAProtect Intellectual Property ActPROTECT IP
The Act was rewritten as the Protect IP Act.
The PROTECT IP Act is a re-write of the Combating Online Infringement and Counterfeits Act (COICA), which failed to pass in 2010.

Ron Wyden

Senator Ron WydenWydenSenator Ron Wyden (D-OR)
Senator Ron Wyden (D-OR) announced he would take the steps necessary to halt COICA so it is not enacted into law in 2010, and was successful, effectively killing this bill and requiring it to be resubmitted and for it to make it through a new committee again in 2011 with a different makeup of its members.
On November 19, 2010, Wyden announced he would take the steps necessary to put a hold on The Combating Online Infringement and Counterfeits Act (COICA) so it is not enacted into law that year.

Bill (law)

billbillslegislation
United States Senate Bill S.3804, known as the Combating Online Infringement and Counterfeits Act (COICA) was a bill introduced by Senator Patrick Leahy (D-VT) on September 20, 2010.

Title 18 of the United States Code

Title 1818 U.S.C.18 U.S.C.: Crimes and Criminal Procedure
It proposed amendments to Chapter 113 of Title 18 of the United States Code that would authorize the Attorney General to bring an in rem action against any domain name found "dedicated to infringing activities", as defined within the text of the bill.

United States Attorney General

Attorney GeneralU.S. Attorney GeneralAttorney General of the United States
It proposed amendments to Chapter 113 of Title 18 of the United States Code that would authorize the Attorney General to bring an in rem action against any domain name found "dedicated to infringing activities", as defined within the text of the bill.

In rem jurisdiction

in remjurisdiction ''in remin rem'' jurisdiction
It proposed amendments to Chapter 113 of Title 18 of the United States Code that would authorize the Attorney General to bring an in rem action against any domain name found "dedicated to infringing activities", as defined within the text of the bill. The bill, if passed, would have allowed the Attorney General to bring an in rem action against the infringing domain name in United States District Court, and seek an order requesting injunctive relief.

Domain name

domaindomain namesdomains
It proposed amendments to Chapter 113 of Title 18 of the United States Code that would authorize the Attorney General to bring an in rem action against any domain name found "dedicated to infringing activities", as defined within the text of the bill.
The U.S. Congress passed the Combating Online Infringement and Counterfeits Act in 2010.

Motion Picture Association of America

MPAAMotion Picture Producers and Distributors of AmericaMotion Picture Association
The bill was supported by the Motion Picture Association of America, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, the Screen Actors Guild, Viacom, and the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees, Moving Picture Technicians, Artists and Allied Crafts of the United States.

United States Chamber of Commerce

U.S. Chamber of CommerceAmerican Chamber of CommerceUS Chamber of Commerce
The bill was supported by the Motion Picture Association of America, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, the Screen Actors Guild, Viacom, and the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees, Moving Picture Technicians, Artists and Allied Crafts of the United States.

Screen Actors Guild

SAGScreen Actor's GuildScreen Actors' Guild
The bill was supported by the Motion Picture Association of America, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, the Screen Actors Guild, Viacom, and the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees, Moving Picture Technicians, Artists and Allied Crafts of the United States.

Viacom (2005–present)

ViacomViacom Inc.Viacom New Media
The bill was supported by the Motion Picture Association of America, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, the Screen Actors Guild, Viacom, and the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees, Moving Picture Technicians, Artists and Allied Crafts of the United States.

Center for Democracy and Technology

Center for Democracy & TechnologyCDTJerry Berman
It was opposed by organizations and individuals such as Center for Democracy and Technology, the Electronic Frontier Foundation, Demand Progress, the Distributed Computing Industry Association, Tim Berners-Lee, the American Civil Liberties Union and Human Rights Watch.

Electronic Frontier Foundation

EFFElectronic Freedom FoundationElectronic Frontiers Foundation
It was opposed by organizations and individuals such as Center for Democracy and Technology, the Electronic Frontier Foundation, Demand Progress, the Distributed Computing Industry Association, Tim Berners-Lee, the American Civil Liberties Union and Human Rights Watch.

Tim Berners-Lee

Sir Tim Berners-LeeTim Berners LeeTimothy Berners-Lee
It was opposed by organizations and individuals such as Center for Democracy and Technology, the Electronic Frontier Foundation, Demand Progress, the Distributed Computing Industry Association, Tim Berners-Lee, the American Civil Liberties Union and Human Rights Watch.

American Civil Liberties Union

ACLUAmerican Civil Liberties Union (ACLU)ACLU Foundation
It was opposed by organizations and individuals such as Center for Democracy and Technology, the Electronic Frontier Foundation, Demand Progress, the Distributed Computing Industry Association, Tim Berners-Lee, the American Civil Liberties Union and Human Rights Watch.

Human Rights Watch

HRWAmericas WatchHuman Right Watch
It was opposed by organizations and individuals such as Center for Democracy and Technology, the Electronic Frontier Foundation, Demand Progress, the Distributed Computing Industry Association, Tim Berners-Lee, the American Civil Liberties Union and Human Rights Watch.

United States Senate Committee on the Judiciary

Senate Judiciary CommitteeJudiciaryJudiciary Committee
The bill passed the Senate Judiciary Committee with a vote of 19-0 but never received a full vote on the Senate floor.

Lanham Act

Trademark Act of 1946The Lanham ActLanham Trademark Act of 1946
(ii) to sell or distribute goods, services, or materials bearing a counterfeit mark, as that term is defined in section 34(d) of the Act entitled 'An Act to provide for the registration and protection of trademarks used in commerce, to carry out the provisions of certain international conventions, and for other purposes', approved July 5, 1946 (commonly referred to as the 'Trademark Act of 1946' or the 'Lanham Act'; (d)); and

United States district court

U.S. District Courtfederal district courtdistrict court
The bill, if passed, would have allowed the Attorney General to bring an in rem action against the infringing domain name in United States District Court, and seek an order requesting injunctive relief.

Injunction

temporary restraining orderinjunctive reliefenjoin
The bill, if passed, would have allowed the Attorney General to bring an in rem action against the infringing domain name in United States District Court, and seek an order requesting injunctive relief.

United States

AmericanU.S.USA
If the infringing website had not been located in the United States, the bill empowered the Attorney General to bring a similar action in the United States District Court for the District of Columbia.