Come Blow Your Horn

play of the same name
Come Blow Your Horn is Neil Simon's first play, which premiered on Broadway in 1961 and had a London production in 1962 at the Prince of Wales Theatre.wikipedia
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Neil Simon

Neil Simon’sSimonN.Simon
Come Blow Your Horn is Neil Simon's first play, which premiered on Broadway in 1961 and had a London production in 1962 at the Prince of Wales Theatre.
He began writing his own plays beginning with Come Blow Your Horn (1961), which took him three years to complete and ran for 678 performances on Broadway.

Brooks Atkinson Theatre

Mansfield TheatreBrooks Atkinson TheaterBrooks Atkinson
Come Blow Your Horn opened on Broadway at the Brooks Atkinson Theatre on February 22, 1961 and closed on October 6, 1962 after 677 performances and one preview.

Arlene Golonka

The cast featured Hal March (Alan Baker), Arlene Golonka, Warren Berlinger (Buddy), Lou Jacobi (Mr.
Despite that setback, she continued working in other plays such as Take Me Along with Jackie Gleason, Walter Pidgeon and Robert Morse (448 performances from late 1959 to late 1960), Neil Simon's first Broadway play, Come Blow Your Horn, which ran 677 performances from February 1961 until October 1962, and One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, starring Kirk Douglas, from November 1963 until January 1964.

Warren Berlinger

The cast featured Hal March (Alan Baker), Arlene Golonka, Warren Berlinger (Buddy), Lou Jacobi (Mr.
Berlinger appeared in both the Broadway stage and Hollywood movie productions of Blue Denim (winning a Theatre World Award for the stage version), and also Happy Time, Anniversary Waltz (later adapted as the movie Happy Anniversary), and Come Blow Your Horn in 1961.

Lou Jacobi

The cast featured Hal March (Alan Baker), Arlene Golonka, Warren Berlinger (Buddy), Lou Jacobi (Mr.
Other Broadway performances included Paddy Chayefsky’s The Tenth Man (1959), Woody Allen’s Don’t Drink the Water (1966), and Neil Simon’s debut play Come Blow Your Horn (1961), in which he portrayed the playboy protagonist’s disappointed father.

Prince of Wales Theatre

Prince of WalesThe Prince of Wales TheatrePrince's Theatre
Come Blow Your Horn is Neil Simon's first play, which premiered on Broadway in 1961 and had a London production in 1962 at the Prince of Wales Theatre. The play opened in the West End in 1962 at the Prince of Wales Theatre, starring Michael Crawford as Buddy, Bob Monkhouse and David Kossoff.
Neil Simon's play, Come Blow Your Horn, starring Michael Crawford, played in 1962, followed by a season of Martha Graham's dance company, including the world première of her ballet Circe.

Stanley Prager

The director was Stanley Prager, with sets and lighting by Ralph Alswang.
He switched gears and began directing with Neil Simon's Come Blow Your Horn in 1961.

Michael Crawford

Michael IngramMichael Patrick Crawford
The play opened in the West End in 1962 at the Prince of Wales Theatre, starring Michael Crawford as Buddy, Bob Monkhouse and David Kossoff.
Among his stage work, he performed in André Birabeau's French comedy Head of the Family, Neil Simon's Come Blow Your Horn, Bernard Kops's Change for the Angel, Francis Swann's Out of the Frying Pan, Shakespeare's Julius Caesar, Coriolanus, and Twelfth Night, Oscar Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest, The Striplings, The Move After Checkmate and others.

Come Blow Your Horn (film)

Come Blow Your Hornfilm
The play was made into a film in 1963, starring Frank Sinatra as Alan and Tony Bill as Buddy.
Come Blow Your Horn is a 1963 American comedy film starring Frank Sinatra, directed by Bud Yorkin with a screenplay by Norman Lear, and based on the play of the same name by Neil Simon.

Tony Bill

Bill
The play was made into a film in 1963, starring Frank Sinatra as Alan and Tony Bill as Buddy.
As an actor, Bill has had supporting roles in films including Come Blow Your Horn (1963), Shampoo (1975), Pee-wee's Big Adventure (1985), and Less Than Zero (1987).

Amanda Boxer

In June 2005 Jacob Murray directed a production at the Royal Exchange, Manchester with Jamie Glover as Alan Baker, Andrew Langtree as Buddy Baker, Malcolm Rennie as Mr Baker and Amanda Boxer as Mrs Baker.

Play (theatre)

playplaysstage play
Come Blow Your Horn is Neil Simon's first play, which premiered on Broadway in 1961 and had a London production in 1962 at the Prince of Wales Theatre.

Broadway theatre

BroadwayBroadway musicalBroadway theater
Come Blow Your Horn is Neil Simon's first play, which premiered on Broadway in 1961 and had a London production in 1962 at the Prince of Wales Theatre. Come Blow Your Horn opened on Broadway at the Brooks Atkinson Theatre on February 22, 1961 and closed on October 6, 1962 after 677 performances and one preview.

Hal March

Sweeney and MarchSweeney and March Show
The cast featured Hal March (Alan Baker), Arlene Golonka, Warren Berlinger (Buddy), Lou Jacobi (Mr.

West End theatre

West EndLondonLondon's West End
The play opened in the West End in 1962 at the Prince of Wales Theatre, starring Michael Crawford as Buddy, Bob Monkhouse and David Kossoff.

Royal Exchange, Manchester

Royal Exchange TheatreRoyal ExchangeManchester Royal Exchange
In June 2005 Jacob Murray directed a production at the Royal Exchange, Manchester with Jamie Glover as Alan Baker, Andrew Langtree as Buddy Baker, Malcolm Rennie as Mr Baker and Amanda Boxer as Mrs Baker.

Jamie Glover

In June 2005 Jacob Murray directed a production at the Royal Exchange, Manchester with Jamie Glover as Alan Baker, Andrew Langtree as Buddy Baker, Malcolm Rennie as Mr Baker and Amanda Boxer as Mrs Baker.

Andrew Langtree

In June 2005 Jacob Murray directed a production at the Royal Exchange, Manchester with Jamie Glover as Alan Baker, Andrew Langtree as Buddy Baker, Malcolm Rennie as Mr Baker and Amanda Boxer as Mrs Baker.

Frank Sinatra

SinatraFrankFrankie
The play was made into a film in 1963, starring Frank Sinatra as Alan and Tony Bill as Buddy.

Howard Taubman

H. Howard TaubmanTaubman, Howard
Howard Taubman, in his review for The New York Times, wrote that the play was "smoothly plotted and deftly written...Mr. Simon has served up a multitude of sprightly lines. Best of all, he has provided some explosively hilarious moments rooted in character."

The New York Times

New York TimesNY TimesNYT
Howard Taubman, in his review for The New York Times, wrote that the play was "smoothly plotted and deftly written...Mr. Simon has served up a multitude of sprightly lines. Best of all, he has provided some explosively hilarious moments rooted in character."