Comic strip

comic stripscartoon stripcomic-stripnewspaper stripnewspaper comic stripstripstripsstrip cartooncomic panelnewspaper strips
A comic strip is a sequence of drawings arranged in interrelated panels to display brief humor or form a narrative, often serialized, with text in balloons and captions.wikipedia
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Newspaper

daily newspapernewspapersdaily
Traditionally, throughout the 20th century and into the 21st, these have been published in newspapers and magazines, with horizontal strips printed in black-and-white in daily newspapers, while Sunday newspapers offered longer sequences in special color comics sections.
Newspapers can cover a wide variety of fields such as politics, business, sports and art, and often include materials such as opinion columns, weather forecasts, reviews of local services, obituaries, birth notices, crosswords, editorial cartoons, comic strips, and advice columns.

Daily comic strip

daily stripdailydaily strips
Traditionally, throughout the 20th century and into the 21st, these have been published in newspapers and magazines, with horizontal strips printed in black-and-white in daily newspapers, while Sunday newspapers offered longer sequences in special color comics sections.
A daily strip is a newspaper comic strip format, appearing on weekdays, Monday through Saturday, as contrasted with a Sunday strip, which typically only appears on Sundays.

Blondie (comic strip)

BlondieBlondie and DagwoodBlondie Bumstead
As the name implies, comic strips can be humorous (for example, "gag-a-day" strips such as Blondie, Bringing Up Father, Marmaduke, and Pearls Before Swine).
Blondie is an American comic strip created by cartoonist Chic Young.

Bringing Up Father

JiggsMaggie and JiggsBringing Up Father: From Sea to Shining Sea
As the name implies, comic strips can be humorous (for example, "gag-a-day" strips such as Blondie, Bringing Up Father, Marmaduke, and Pearls Before Swine).
Bringing Up Father was an American comic strip created by cartoonist George McManus.

Cartoonist

comics artistcomic book artistcartooning
Strips are written and drawn by a comics artist/cartoonist.
Cartoonists may work in many formats, such as booklets, comic strips, comic books, editorial cartoons, graphic novels, manuals, gag cartoons, illustrations, storyboards, posters, shirts, books, advertisements, greeting cards, magazines, newspapers, and video game packaging.

Pearls Before Swine (comics)

Pearls Before SwineRatZebra
As the name implies, comic strips can be humorous (for example, "gag-a-day" strips such as Blondie, Bringing Up Father, Marmaduke, and Pearls Before Swine).
Pearls Before Swine (also known as Pearls) is an American comic strip written and illustrated by Stephan Pastis.

Webcomic

webcomicsweb comicwebmanga
With the development of the internet, they began to appear online as webcomics.
Webcomics range from traditional comic strips and graphic novels to avant garde comics, and cover many genres, styles and subjects.

Marmaduke

comic striplong-running comic strip of the same nameof the same name
As the name implies, comic strips can be humorous (for example, "gag-a-day" strips such as Blondie, Bringing Up Father, Marmaduke, and Pearls Before Swine).
Marmaduke is a newspaper comic strip revolving around the Winslow family and their Great Dane, Marmaduke, drawn by Brad Anderson from June 1954 to 2015.

Terry and the Pirates (comic strip)

Terry and the Piratescomic stripcomic strip of the same name
Starting in the late 1920s, comic strips expanded from their mirthful origins to feature adventure stories, as seen in Popeye, Captain Easy, Buck Rogers, Tarzan, and Terry and the Pirates.
Terry and the Pirates was an action-adventure comic strip created by cartoonist Milton Caniff, which originally ran from October 22, 1934 to February 25, 1973.

Tarzan in comics

TarzancomicTarzan Family
Starting in the late 1920s, comic strips expanded from their mirthful origins to feature adventure stories, as seen in Popeye, Captain Easy, Buck Rogers, Tarzan, and Terry and the Pirates.
Over the years, many artists have drawn the Tarzan comic strip, notably Rex Maxon (1929–1947), Burne Hogarth (1937–1945, 1947–1950), Ruben Moreira (1945–1947), Dan Barry (1948), Paul Reinman (1949–1950), Bob Lubbers (1950–1954), John Celardo (1954–1967), Russ Manning (1967–1979), Gil Kane (1979–1981), Mike Grell (1981–1983), Gray Morrow (1983–2001) and Eric Battle (2001–2002).

Captain Easy

Starting in the late 1920s, comic strips expanded from their mirthful origins to feature adventure stories, as seen in Popeye, Captain Easy, Buck Rogers, Tarzan, and Terry and the Pirates.
Captain Easy, Soldier of Fortune was an American action/adventure comic strip created by Roy Crane that was syndicated by Newspaper Enterprise Association beginning on Sunday, July 30, 1933.

Judge Parker

Soap-opera continuity strips such as Judge Parker and Mary Worth gained popularity in the 1940s.
Judge Parker is an American soap opera-style comic strip created by Nicholas P. Dallis that first appeared on November 24, 1952.

William Hogarth

HogarthHogarthianHogarth, William
William Hogarth's 18th century English cartoons include both narrative sequences, such as A Rake's Progress, and single panels.
His work ranges from realistic portraiture to comic strip-like series of pictures called "modern moral subjects", He is perhaps best known for his series A Harlot's Progress, A Rake's Progress and Marriage A-la-Mode.

Gag-a-day

gag-a-day strip
As the name implies, comic strips can be humorous (for example, "gag-a-day" strips such as Blondie, Bringing Up Father, Marmaduke, and Pearls Before Swine).
A gag-a-day comic strip is the style of writing comic cartoons such that every installment of a strip delivers a complete joke (or other kind of artistic statement).

The Yellow Kid

Yellow KidHogan's AlleyYellow Kid Award
The Yellow Kid is usually credited as one of the first newspaper strips.
The Yellow Kid is an American comic strip character that appeared from 1895 to 1898 in Joseph Pulitzer's New York World, and later William Randolph Hearst's New York Journal.

Rudolph Dirks

Max and Moritz provided an inspiration for German immigrant Rudolph Dirks, who created the Katzenjammer Kids in 1897 – a strip starring two German-American boys visually modelled on Max and Moritz.
Rudolph Dirks (February 26, 1877 – April 20, 1968) was one of the earliest and most noted comic strip artists, well known for The Katzenjammer Kids (later known as The Captain and the Kids).

Harold Knerr

H. H. KnerrHarold H. KnerrProfessor Dinglehoofer and his Dog
Hearst promptly hired Harold Knerr to draw his own version of the strip.
Harold Hering Knerr (September 4, 1882 – July 8, 1949) was an American comic strip creator, who signed his work '''H.

Comic strip syndication

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Most newspaper comic strips are syndicated; a syndicate hires people to write and draw a strip and then distributes it to many newspapers for a fee.
A comic strip syndicate functions as an agent for cartoonists and comic strip creators, placing the cartoons and strips in as many newspapers as possible on behalf of the artist.

Will Eisner

EisnerEisner, WillW. Eisner
All are called, generically, comic strips, though cartoonist Will Eisner has suggested that "sequential art" would be a better genre-neutral name.
In 1936, high-school friend and fellow cartoonist Bob Kane, of future Batman fame, suggested that the 19-year-old Eisner try selling cartoons to the new comic book Wow, What A Magazine! "Comic books" at the time were tabloid-sized collections of comic strip reprints in color.

Comics

comiccomic bookcomic series
In the United States, the great popularity of comics sprang from the newspaper war (1887 onwards) between Pulitzer and Hearst.
Common forms include comic strips, editorial and gag cartoons, and comic books.

Biblia pauperum

narrative storyVersions of the Bible relying primarily on images
The Biblia pauperum ("Paupers' Bible"), a tradition of picture Bibles beginning in the later Middle Ages, sometimes depicted Biblical events with words spoken by the figures in the miniatures written on scrolls coming out of their mouths—which makes them to some extent ancestors of the modern cartoon strips.
To this extent one might see parallels with modern cartoon strips.

Cartoon

cartoonsHumor comicscartoonish
There were more than 200 different comic strips and daily cartoon panels in American newspapers alone each day for most of the 20th century, for a total of at least 7,300,000 episodes.
Bill Hoest, Jerry Marcus, and Virgil Partch began as magazine gag cartoonists and moved to syndicated comic strips.

Walt Kelly

Peter WheatSelby Kelly
For example, the Pogo comic strip by Walt Kelly originally appeared only in the New York Star in 1948 and was not picked up for syndication until the following year.
Walter Crawford Kelly, Jr. (August 25, 1913 – October 18, 1973), commonly known as Walt Kelly, was an American animator and cartoonist, best known for the comic strip Pogo.

Gasoline Alley

Skeezixcartoon of the same namecomic strip
The first strip to feature aging characters was Gasoline Alley.
Gasoline Alley is a comic strip created by Frank King and distributed by Tribune Content Agency.

Barney Google and Snuffy Smith

Barney GoogleSnuffy SmithBarney Google: Gambling, Horse Races & High-Toned Women
Barney Google and Snuffy Smith, originally Take Barney Google, F'rinstance, is an American comic strip created by cartoonist Billy DeBeck.