Command-line interface

command linecommand-linecommand line interfaceCLIcommand-line interpretercommand line interpretercommand-line argumentcommand promptpromptconsole
A command-line interface (CLI) is a means of interacting with a computer program where the user (or client) issues commands to the program in the form of successive lines of text (command lines).wikipedia
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Command (computing)

commandcommandscomputer command
A command-line interface (CLI) is a means of interacting with a computer program where the user (or client) issues commands to the program in the form of successive lines of text (command lines).
It may be issued via a command-line interface, such as a shell, or as input to a network service as part of a network protocol, or as an event in a graphical user interface triggered by the user selecting an option in a menu.

PHP

PHP5PDOPHP programming language
This includes programming languages, such as Tcl/Tk, and PHP, as well as many utility programs, such as the compression utility WinZip, and File Transfer Protocol (FTP) and SSH/Telnet clients.
PHP code may be executed with a command line interface (CLI), embedded into HTML code, or used in combination with various web template systems, web content management systems, and web frameworks.

Unix

UNIX operating systemAT&T UnixUnix-like
Such access was primarily provided to users by computer terminals starting in the mid-1960s, and continued to be used throughout the 1970s and 1980s on VAX/VMS, Unix systems and personal computer systems including MS-DOS, CP/M and Apple DOS.
Unix systems are characterized by various concepts: the use of plain text for storing data; a hierarchical file system; treating devices and certain types of inter-process communication (IPC) as files; and the use of a large number of software tools, small programs that can be strung together through a command-line interpreter using pipes, as opposed to using a single monolithic program that includes all of the same functionality.

Bourne shell

shBourneshell
Examples of command-line interpreters include DEC's DIGITAL Command Language (DCL) in OpenVMS and RSX-11, the various Unix shells (sh, ksh, csh, tcsh, bash, etc.), CP/M's CCP, DOS's COMMAND.COM, as well as the OS/2 and the Windows CMD.EXE programs, the latter groups being based heavily on DEC's RSX-11 and RSTS CLIs.
The Bourne shell is a shell, or command-line interpreter, for computer operating systems.

CP/M

CP/M-80CP/M operating systemBDOS
Such access was primarily provided to users by computer terminals starting in the mid-1960s, and continued to be used throughout the 1970s and 1980s on VAX/VMS, Unix systems and personal computer systems including MS-DOS, CP/M and Apple DOS. Examples of command-line interpreters include DEC's DIGITAL Command Language (DCL) in OpenVMS and RSX-11, the various Unix shells (sh, ksh, csh, tcsh, bash, etc.), CP/M's CCP, DOS's COMMAND.COM, as well as the OS/2 and the Windows CMD.EXE programs, the latter groups being based heavily on DEC's RSX-11 and RSTS CLIs.
All CP/M commands had to be typed in on the command line.

COMMAND.COM

COMMANDDOS promptMS-DOS Prompt
Examples of command-line interpreters include DEC's DIGITAL Command Language (DCL) in OpenVMS and RSX-11, the various Unix shells (sh, ksh, csh, tcsh, bash, etc.), CP/M's CCP, DOS's COMMAND.COM, as well as the OS/2 and the Windows CMD.EXE programs, the latter groups being based heavily on DEC's RSX-11 and RSTS CLIs.
COMMAND.COM is the default command-line interpreter for DOS, Windows 95, Windows 98, Windows 98SE and Windows ME.

Take Command Console

4NTTake Command4NT / Take Command
Under most operating systems, it is possible to replace the default shell program with alternatives; examples include 4DOS for DOS, 4OS2 for OS/2, and 4NT / Take Command for Windows.
Take Command Console (TCC), formerly known as 4DOS for Windows NT (4NT), is a command line interpreter by JP Software, designed as a substitute for the default command interpreter in Microsoft Windows, CMD.EXE.

C shell

cshChistory
Examples of command-line interpreters include DEC's DIGITAL Command Language (DCL) in OpenVMS and RSX-11, the various Unix shells (sh, ksh, csh, tcsh, bash, etc.), CP/M's CCP, DOS's COMMAND.COM, as well as the OS/2 and the Windows CMD.EXE programs, the latter groups being based heavily on DEC's RSX-11 and RSTS CLIs.
The C shell is a command processor typically run in a text window, allowing the user to type commands.

Keyboard shortcut

hotkeykeyboard shortcutshotkeys
Alternatives to the command line interface include, but are not limited to text user interface menus (for example, IBM AIX SMIT), keyboard shortcuts, and various other desktop metaphors centered on the pointer (usually controlled with a mouse).
Keyboard shortcuts are typically a means for invoking one or more commands using the keyboard that would otherwise be accessible only through a menu, a pointing device, different levels of a user interface, or via a command-line interface.

File Transfer Protocol

FTPFTP serverFTP client
This includes programming languages, such as Tcl/Tk, and PHP, as well as many utility programs, such as the compression utility WinZip, and File Transfer Protocol (FTP) and SSH/Telnet clients.
The first FTP client applications were command-line programs developed before operating systems had graphical user interfaces, and are still shipped with most Windows, Unix, and Linux operating systems.

Telnet

telnetdteleportingTELNET client
This includes programming languages, such as Tcl/Tk, and PHP, as well as many utility programs, such as the compression utility WinZip, and File Transfer Protocol (FTP) and SSH/Telnet clients.
Historically, Telnet provided access to a command-line interface on a remote host.

RSTS/E

RSTSRSTS-11
Examples of command-line interpreters include DEC's DIGITAL Command Language (DCL) in OpenVMS and RSX-11, the various Unix shells (sh, ksh, csh, tcsh, bash, etc.), CP/M's CCP, DOS's COMMAND.COM, as well as the OS/2 and the Windows CMD.EXE programs, the latter groups being based heavily on DEC's RSX-11 and RSTS CLIs.
A systems manager could now decide during the bootstrap phase which RTS to run as the systems default KBM.

Menu (computing)

menumenuspull-down menu
Alternatives to the command line interface include, but are not limited to text user interface menus (for example, IBM AIX SMIT), keyboard shortcuts, and various other desktop metaphors centered on the pointer (usually controlled with a mouse).
A computer using a command line interface may present a list of relevant commands with assigned short-cuts (digits, numbers or characters) on the screen.

Tcsh

TENEX C shell
Examples of command-line interpreters include DEC's DIGITAL Command Language (DCL) in OpenVMS and RSX-11, the various Unix shells (sh, ksh, csh, tcsh, bash, etc.), CP/M's CCP, DOS's COMMAND.COM, as well as the OS/2 and the Windows CMD.EXE programs, the latter groups being based heavily on DEC's RSX-11 and RSTS CLIs.
It is essentially the C shell with programmable command-line completion, command-line editing, and a few other features.

Terminal emulator

terminal emulationterminalterminal program
As the microcomputer revolution replaced the traditional – minicomputer + terminals – time sharing architecture, hardware terminals were replaced by terminal emulators — PC software that interpreted terminal signals sent through the PC's serial ports.
Though typically synonymous with a shell or text terminal, the term terminal covers all remote terminals, including graphical interfaces.

Cygwin

CygnixCygwin projectWindows/Cygwin
MinGW and Cygwin are open-source packages for Windows that offer a Unix-like CLI.
The Cygwin installation directory behaves like the root and follows a similar directory layout to that found in Unix-like systems, with familiar directories like /bin, /home, /etc, /usr, /var available within it, and includes by default hundreds of programs and command-line tools commonly found in the Unix world, plus the terminal emulator Mintty which is the default command-line interface tool provided to interact with the environment.

Glenda Schroeder

Pouzin returned to his native France in 1965, and the first Multics shell was developed by Glenda Schroeder.
Glenda Schroeder is an American software engineer noted for implementing the first command-line user interface shell and publishing one of the earliest research papers describing electronic mail systems while working as a member of the staff at the MIT Computation Center in 1965.

MATLAB

alternativesfilem-script
For example, all features of MATLAB, a numerical analysis computer program, are available via the CLI, whereas the MATLAB GUI exposes only a subset of features.
Common usage of the MATLAB application involves using the "Command Window" as an interactive mathematical shell or executing text files containing MATLAB code.

Thompson shell

shV6 shell
The first Unix shell, the V6 shell, was developed by Ken Thompson in 1971 at Bell Labs and was modeled after Schroeder's Multics shell.
It was a simple command interpreter, not designed for scripting, but nonetheless introduced several innovative features to the command-line interface and led to the development of the later Unix shells.

Bash (Unix shell)

BashBash shellBash script
Examples of command-line interpreters include DEC's DIGITAL Command Language (DCL) in OpenVMS and RSX-11, the various Unix shells (sh, ksh, csh, tcsh, bash, etc.), CP/M's CCP, DOS's COMMAND.COM, as well as the OS/2 and the Windows CMD.EXE programs, the latter groups being based heavily on DEC's RSX-11 and RSTS CLIs.
Bash is a command processor that typically runs in a text window where the user types commands that cause actions.

Secure Shell

SSHOSSHSSH Client
This includes programming languages, such as Tcl/Tk, and PHP, as well as many utility programs, such as the compression utility WinZip, and File Transfer Protocol (FTP) and SSH/Telnet clients.
Typical applications include remote command-line, login, and remote command execution, but any network service can be secured with SSH.

OpenVMS

VMSVAX/VMSDECwindows
Such access was primarily provided to users by computer terminals starting in the mid-1960s, and continued to be used throughout the 1970s and 1980s on VAX/VMS, Unix systems and personal computer systems including MS-DOS, CP/M and Apple DOS. Examples of command-line interpreters include DEC's DIGITAL Command Language (DCL) in OpenVMS and RSX-11, the various Unix shells (sh, ksh, csh, tcsh, bash, etc.), CP/M's CCP, DOS's COMMAND.COM, as well as the OS/2 and the Windows CMD.EXE programs, the latter groups being based heavily on DEC's RSX-11 and RSTS CLIs.
It allows breakpoints, watchpoints and interactive runtime program debugging either using a command line or graphical user interface.

Text-based user interface

text-basedtext user interfaceTUI
Alternatives to the command line interface include, but are not limited to text user interface menus (for example, IBM AIX SMIT), keyboard shortcuts, and various other desktop metaphors centered on the pointer (usually controlled with a mouse).
Later versions added the Win32 console as a native interface for command-line interface and TUI programs.

Bulletin board system

BBSbulletin board systemsBBSes
Some of these PCs were running Bulletin Board System software.
Through the late 1980s and early 1990s, there was considerable experimentation with ways to improve the BBS experience from its command-line interface roots.

Shell (computing)

shellshellsgraphical shell
Most operating systems implement a command-line interface in a shell for interactive access to operating system functions or services.
In general, operating system shells use either a command-line interface (CLI) or graphical user interface (GUI), depending on a computer's role and particular operation.