Commentary on Anatomy in Avicenna's Canon

Commentary on Anatomy in'' ''Avicenna's'' ''Canon
The Commentary on Anatomy in Avicenna's Canon is a manuscript written in the 13th century by the Arab physician Ibn al-Nafis.wikipedia
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Ibn al-Nafis

Ibn NafisIbn an-NafisAl-Nafis
The Commentary on Anatomy in Avicenna's Canon is a manuscript written in the 13th century by the Arab physician Ibn al-Nafis.
In 1924, Egyptian physician, Muhyo Al-Deen Altawi, discovered a manuscript entitled, Sharh tashrih al-qanun li’ Ibn Sina, or "Commentary on Anatomy in Avicenna's Canon" in the Prussian State Library in Berlin while studying the history of Arabic Medicine at the medical faculty of Albert Ludwig's University.

Pulmonary circulation

pulmonary vesselspulmonary circuitpulmonary
It contains the earliest descriptions of the coronary circulation and pulmonary circulation systems.
The arab physician, Ibn al-Nafis, wrote the Commentary on Anatomy in Avicenna's Canon in 1242 in which he provided the first known accurate description of pulmonary circulation as it is known today.

Andrea Alpago

Andreas Alpagus BellunensisAndreas Belunensis
The manuscript was translated into Latin by the Italian physician Andrea Alpago, In 1520, Alpago returned to Padua with a Latin translation of the commentary, after living in the Arabian Peninsula for 30 years.

Anatomy

anatomistanatomicalanatomically
The Commentary on Anatomy in Avicenna's Canon is a manuscript written in the 13th century by the Arab physician Ibn al-Nafis.

Avicenna

Ibn SinaIbn SīnāAbu Ali ibn Sina
The Commentary on Anatomy in Avicenna's Canon is a manuscript written in the 13th century by the Arab physician Ibn al-Nafis.

Berlin State Library

Staatsbibliothek zu BerlinPrussian State LibraryStaatsbibliothek
The manuscript was discovered in 1924 in the archives of the Prussian State Library in Berlin, Germany.

Berlin

Berlin, GermanyState of BerlinGerman capital
The manuscript was discovered in 1924 in the archives of the Prussian State Library in Berlin, Germany.

Coronary circulation

coronary arteriescoronarycoronary artery
It contains the earliest descriptions of the coronary circulation and pulmonary circulation systems.

Padua

PadovaPadua, ItalyPatavium
The manuscript was translated into Latin by the Italian physician Andrea Alpago, In 1520, Alpago returned to Padua with a Latin translation of the commentary, after living in the Arabian Peninsula for 30 years.

Arabian Peninsula

ArabiaArabianArab Peninsula
The manuscript was translated into Latin by the Italian physician Andrea Alpago, In 1520, Alpago returned to Padua with a Latin translation of the commentary, after living in the Arabian Peninsula for 30 years.

Galen

Galen of PergamonGalenic medicineGalenus
1242, when Ibn al-Nafis published his book Sharh tashrih al-qanun li’ Ibn Sina (Commentary on Anatomy in Avicenna's Canon), in which he reported his discovery of the pulmonary circulation.

Islamic Golden Age

medieval Islamic worldIslamic civilizationGolden Age of Islam
In the cardiovascular system, Ibn al-Nafis in his Commentary on Anatomy in Avicenna's Canon was the first known scholar to contradict the contention of the Galen School that blood could pass between the ventricles in the heart through the cardiac inter-ventricular septum that separates them, saying that there is no passage between the ventricles at this point.

Heart

cardiachuman heartapex of the heart
The earliest descriptions of the coronary and pulmonary circulation systems can be found in the Commentary on Anatomy in Avicenna's Canon, published in 1242 by Ibn al-Nafis.