Committee for the Relief of the Black Poor

Black PoorLondon blacksLondon's Black Poorthe "poor blacks" of Londonthe original settlers
The Committee for the Relief of the Black Poor was a charitable organisation founded in London in 1786 to provide sustenance for distressed people of African and Asian origin.wikipedia
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Black British

blackBlack AfricanBlack Britons
They formed a portion of the broader Black British community, which predominantly consisted of people employed at menial urban jobs, but had prominent members such as Ignatius Sancho and Olaudah Equiano.
The following year, in 1787, encouraged by the Committee for the Relief of the Black Poor, 4,000 black Londoners were aided in emigrating to Sierra Leone in West Africa, founding the first British colony on the continent.

Lascar

lascarslashkarsLaskar
Originally concern was expressed about Lascars, Asian seamen.
In 1786, the Committee for the Relief of the Black Poor was originally set up thanks to concern over lascars left in London.

Olaudah Equiano

Gustavus VassaEquianoEquiano, Olaudah
They formed a portion of the broader Black British community, which predominantly consisted of people employed at menial urban jobs, but had prominent members such as Ignatius Sancho and Olaudah Equiano.
In 1783, following the United States' gaining independence, Equiano became involved in helping the Black Poor of London, who were mostly those African-American slaves freed during and after the American Revolution by the British.

East End of London

East EndEast LondonLondon's East End
Most of the Black Poor lived in impoverished East End parishes, or in Seven Dials and Marylebone.
In 1786, the Committee for the Relief of the Black Poor was formed by citizens concerned at the size of London's indigent Black population, many of whom had been expelled from North America as Black Loyalists — former slaves who had fought on the side of the British in the American Revolutionary War.

Thomas Boddington

The effort attracted some prominent figures from London's financial elite: George Peters, Governor of the Bank of England, Thomas Boddington, the noted philanthropist and slave owner, John Julius Angerstein, General Robert Melville.
Boddington was involved in the slave trade and active as part of the West India lobby, but also participated in other committees: The Committee for the Relief of the Black Poor, and the Committees for Repeal of the Test and Corporation Acts.

Black Loyalist

Black LoyalistsothersAfrican descent
Aside from general benevolence, this cause attracted particular sympathy because so many were Black Loyalists who had served in the British armed forces and been resettled in London after the American Revolution.
Many ended up among London's Black Poor, with 4,000 resettled by the Sierra Leone Company to Freetown in Africa in 1787.

John Julius Angerstein

Angerstein collectionAngersteinAngerstein Wharf
The effort attracted some prominent figures from London's financial elite: George Peters, Governor of the Bank of England, Thomas Boddington, the noted philanthropist and slave owner, John Julius Angerstein, General Robert Melville.
Although a slave owner, he was also on the Committee for the Relief of the Black Poor an organisation with strong abolitionist connections.

James Pettit Andrews

The abolitionists Samuel Hoare and two of the three Thornton brothers, Henry and Samuel, were also involved, along with James Pettit Andrews and Sir Joseph Andrews.
He was a regular participant in the work of the Committee for the Relief of the Black Poor in the 1780s.

Yorkshire Stingo

Apollo Saloonassociations with Yorkshire
The Committee soon organised two venues for regular distribution of alms: the White Raven tavern in Mile End and the Yorkshire Stingo, in Lisson Grove, Marylebone.
In 1786, the Committee for the Relief of the Black Poor used it as one of the centres for distributing alms.

Granville Sharp

Granville SharpeG. Sharpe
The Sierra Leone Resettlement Scheme was formulated because humanitarians like Granville Sharp saw it as a means of showing the pro-slavery lobby that black people could contribute towards the running of the new colony of Sierra Leone.
Henry Smeathman, a plant collector and entomologist who had visited Sierra Leone, propounded to the Committee for the Relief of the Black Poor that the country would be an excellent location.

Charitable organization

charityregistered charitycharities
The Committee for the Relief of the Black Poor was a charitable organisation founded in London in 1786 to provide sustenance for distressed people of African and Asian origin.

Sierra Leone

Sierra LeoneanRepublic of Sierra LeoneSLE
It played a crucial role in the proposal to form a colony in Sierra Leone.

Abolitionism in the United Kingdom

abolitionistabolition of slaveryabolition
The work of the Committee overlapped to some extent with the campaign to abolish slavery in Britain and its empire.

Poor relief

Poor LawPoor Lawsable-bodied poor
The "Black Poor" was the name given in the late 18th century to indigent residents of London who were of black ancestry.

London

London, EnglandLondon, United KingdomLondon, UK
The "Black Poor" was the name given in the late 18th century to indigent residents of London who were of black ancestry.

Black people

blackblacksBlack African
The "Black Poor" was the name given in the late 18th century to indigent residents of London who were of black ancestry.

Atlantic slave trade

transatlantic slave tradeslave tradetrans-Atlantic slave trade
The core of the community were people who had been brought to London as a result of Atlantic slave trade; sometimes as slaves or indentured servants who had served on slave ships.

Indentured servitude

indentured servantindentured servantsindentured labour
The core of the community were people who had been brought to London as a result of Atlantic slave trade; sometimes as slaves or indentured servants who had served on slave ships.

Seven Dials, London

Seven DialsLondon landmarkseven-way junction
Most of the Black Poor lived in impoverished East End parishes, or in Seven Dials and Marylebone.

Marylebone

St MaryleboneMarylebone, LondonSt. Marylebone
Most of the Black Poor lived in impoverished East End parishes, or in Seven Dials and Marylebone. The Committee soon organised two venues for regular distribution of alms: the White Raven tavern in Mile End and the Yorkshire Stingo, in Lisson Grove, Marylebone.

Ignatius Sancho

They formed a portion of the broader Black British community, which predominantly consisted of people employed at menial urban jobs, but had prominent members such as Ignatius Sancho and Olaudah Equiano.

Public Advertiser

The Public AdvertiserGeneral Advertiser
On 5 January 1786 an announcement appeared in the Public Advertiser that Mr. Brown, a baker in Wigmore Street, Cavendish Square, was to "give a Quartern Loaf to every Black in Distress, who will apply on Saturday next between the Hours of Twelve and Two".

Wigmore Street

Wigmore-Street
On 5 January 1786 an announcement appeared in the Public Advertiser that Mr. Brown, a baker in Wigmore Street, Cavendish Square, was to "give a Quartern Loaf to every Black in Distress, who will apply on Saturday next between the Hours of Twelve and Two".

Cavendish Square

Cavendish Square, LondonCavendish
On 5 January 1786 an announcement appeared in the Public Advertiser that Mr. Brown, a baker in Wigmore Street, Cavendish Square, was to "give a Quartern Loaf to every Black in Distress, who will apply on Saturday next between the Hours of Twelve and Two".

Sailor

marinersailorsseaman
Originally concern was expressed about Lascars, Asian seamen.