A report on Commonwealth of Nations

The prime ministers of five members at the 1944 Commonwealth Prime Ministers' Conference. (L-R) Mackenzie King (Canada), Jan Smuts (South Africa), Winston Churchill (United Kingdom), Peter Fraser (New Zealand) and John Curtin (Australia)
Queen Elizabeth II, Head of the Commonwealth
Marlborough House, London, the headquarters of the Commonwealth Secretariat, the Commonwealth's principal intergovernmental institution
The members of the Commonwealth shaded according to their political status. Commonwealth realms are shown in blue, while republics are shaded pink, and members with their own monarchies are displayed in green.
Flags of the members of the Commonwealth in Parliament Square, London
The Commonwealth flag flying at the Parliament of Canada in Ottawa
The Commonwealth Games are the third-largest multi-sport event in the world, bringing together globally popular sports and peculiarly "Commonwealth" sports, such as rugby sevens, shown here at the 2006 Games.
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission serves to commemorate 1.7 million Commonwealth war dead and maintains 2,500 war cemeteries around the world, including this one in Gallipoli.
Draft of the 1921 Anglo-Irish Treaty, with "British Empire" crossed out and "British Commonwealth of Nations" added by hand.

Political association of 56 member states, the vast majority of which are former territories of the British Empire.

- Commonwealth of Nations

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British Empire

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Composed of the dominions, colonies, protectorates, mandates, and other territories ruled or administered by the United Kingdom and its predecessor states.

Composed of the dominions, colonies, protectorates, mandates, and other territories ruled or administered by the United Kingdom and its predecessor states.

A replica of the Matthew, John Cabot's ship used for his second voyage to the New World
African slaves working in 17th-century Virginia, by an unknown artist, 1670
Fort St. George was founded at Madras in 1639.
Robert Clive's victory at the Battle of Plassey established the East India Company as a military as well as a commercial power.
British territories in the Americas, 1763–1776, extending much further than the Thirteen Colonies on the Atlantic coast
James Cook's mission was to find the alleged southern continent Terra Australis.
The Battle of Waterloo in 1815 ended in the defeat of Napoleon and marked the beginning of Pax Britannica.
An 1876 political cartoon of Benjamin Disraeli (1804–1881) making Queen Victoria Empress of India. The caption reads "New crowns for old ones!"
British cavalry charging against Russian forces at Balaclava in 1854
The Rhodes Colossus—Cecil Rhodes spanning "Cape to Cairo"
A poster urging men from countries of the British Empire to enlist
The British Empire at its territorial peak in 1921
George V with British and Dominion prime ministers at the 1926 Imperial Conference
During the Second World War, the Eighth Army was made up of units from many different countries in the British Empire and Commonwealth; it fought in North African and Italian campaigns.
About 14.5 million people lost their homes as a result of the partition of India in 1947.
Eden's decision to invade Egypt in 1956 revealed Britain's post-war weaknesses.
British decolonisation in Africa. By the end of the 1960s, all but Rhodesia (the future Zimbabwe) and the South African mandate of South West Africa (Namibia) had achieved recognised independence.
The fourteen British Overseas Territories
Cricket being played in India. Sports developed in Britain or the former empire continue to be viewed and played.

After independence, many former British colonies joined the Commonwealth of Nations, a free association of independent states.

The heads of government of five members of the Commonwealth of Nations at the 1944 Commonwealth Prime Ministers' Conference.

Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting

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The heads of government of five members of the Commonwealth of Nations at the 1944 Commonwealth Prime Ministers' Conference.
Theresa May chairs the 2018 session
Protests during the 2011 CHOGM in Perth

The Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting (CHOGM; or) is a biennial summit meeting of the de facto leaders from all Commonwealth nations.

Commonwealth realm

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Elizabeth II is the reigning sovereign of each of the 15 Commonwealth realms.
High Commissioner of Belize to the UK meets with the British Minister of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs. High Commissioners act as liaisons between the governments of the Commonwealth realms.
King George VI, with Queen Elizabeth, grants Royal Assent to bills in the Senate of Canada, 1939
William Orpen's The Signing of Peace in the Hall of Mirrors: a compiled portrait of the main delegates to the signing of the Treaty of Versailles, including some of the dominion delegates
King George V with his prime ministers at the Imperial Conference of 1926
Edward VIII and Wallis Simpson in 1936. His proposal to marry her led to his abdication, an act that required the consent of the dominions.
The prime ministers of five Commonwealth countries at the 1944 Commonwealth Prime Ministers' Conference; from left to right: William Lyon Mackenzie King (Canada), Jan Smuts (South Africa), Winston Churchill (United Kingdom), Peter Fraser (New Zealand), and John Curtin (Australia)
The British Empire as it was at the beginning of Queen Elizabeth II's reign, with the United Kingdom itself shown in light red and the other Commonwealth realms shown in pink.
The Governor of Queensland, John Lavarack, proclaims the accession of Elizabeth II at Parliament House, Brisbane, 1952.
Elizabeth II in 2010. In 2010, she addressed the United Nations as queen of all then-16 Commonwealth realms.

A Commonwealth realm is a sovereign state in the Commonwealth of Nations that has Elizabeth II as its monarch and head of state.

Elizabeth II in 2015

Elizabeth II

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Queen of the United Kingdom and 14 other Commonwealth realms.

Queen of the United Kingdom and 14 other Commonwealth realms.

Elizabeth II in 2015
Elizabeth II in 2015
In Auxiliary Territorial Service uniform, April 1945
Elizabeth (far left) on the balcony of Buckingham Palace with her family and Winston Churchill on 8 May 1945
Posing for photographs at Buckingham Palace with new husband Philip after their wedding, 1947
Coronation portrait with husband Philip, 1953
Elizabeth's realms (light red and pink) and their territories and protectorates (dark red) at the beginning of her reign in 1952
With Commonwealth leaders at the 1960 Commonwealth Conference
Seated with Philip on thrones at Canadian parliament, 1957
In Queensland, Australia, 1970
With President Tito of Yugoslavia in Belgrade, 1972
Leaders of the G7 states, members of the royal family and Elizabeth (centre), London, 1977
Riding Burmese at the 1986 Trooping the Colour ceremony
Riding at Windsor with President Reagan, June 1982
Philip and Elizabeth in Germany, October 1992
At the opening of the second Session of the Scottish Parliament, 2003
Greeting NASA employees at the Goddard Space Flight Center, Maryland, May 2007
Visiting Birmingham in July 2012 as part of the Diamond Jubilee tour
Opening the Borders Railway on the day she became the longest-reigning British monarch, 2015. In her speech, she said she had never aspired to achieve that milestone.
In a virtual meeting with Dame Cindy Kiro during the COVID-19 pandemic, October 2021
Meeting children in Brisbane, Australia, October 1982
Sandringham House, Elizabeth's private residence in Norfolk
With then British prime minister Tony Blair, and former prime ministers Margaret Thatcher, Edward Heath, James Callaghan and John Major during her Golden Jubilee in 2002

During the tour, in a broadcast to the British Commonwealth on her 21st birthday, she made the following pledge: "I declare before you all that my whole life, whether it be long or short, shall be devoted to your service and the service of our great imperial family to which we all belong."

Head of the Commonwealth

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The Commonwealth Prime Ministers with the King at Buckingham Palace for the Commonwealth Prime Ministers' Conference, 1949
The Head of the Commonwealth delivering the inaugural address at the CHOGM 2011 in Perth, Australia
The Queen and Commonwealth Prime Ministers at Windsor Castle, 1960
The Queen at the Closing Ceremony of the Brisbane Commonwealth Games, 1982
The Queen passing the Baton to President Patil of India for the Baton relay for the Delhi Commonwealth Games, 2009
The Queen arriving at the Commonwealth Games Opening Ceremony at Glasgow, 2014

Head of the Commonwealth is a title used by the ceremonial leader who symbolises "the free association of independent member nations" of the Commonwealth of Nations, an intergovernmental organisation that currently comprises fifty-six sovereign states.

Opening ceremony of the 1938 British Empire Games at the Sydney Cricket Ground.

Commonwealth Games

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Opening ceremony of the 1938 British Empire Games at the Sydney Cricket Ground.
Statue in Vancouver commemorating the "Miracle Mile" between Roger Bannister and John Landy
3 pence British stamp with theme of 1958 British Empire and Commonwealth Games, Cardiff, Wales
Opening ceremony of the 1982 Commonwealth Games at Brisbane, Australia
Athletics at the Melbourne Cricket Ground (MCG) during the 2006 Commonwealth Games, Melbourne
Athletes of the 1962 Commonwealth Paraplegic Games at Perth
St. Moritz, the venue for all three Winter Games from 1958 to 1966
Headquarters of the CGF at the Commonwealth House (centre) in London
The Queen's Jubilee Baton Relay for the 2002 Commonwealth Games
Opening ceremony of the 2006 Commonwealth Games at Melbourne
Closing ceremony of the 2010 Commonwealth Games at Delhi
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The Commonwealth Games, often referred to as the Friendly Games, is a quadrennial international multi-sport event among athletes from the Commonwealth of Nations.

Commonwealth Secretary-General

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The Commonwealth secretary-general is the head of the Commonwealth Secretariat, the central body which has served the Commonwealth of Nations since its establishment in 1965, and responsible for representing the Commonwealth publicly.

Marlborough House, London, the headquarters of the Commonwealth Secretariat, the Commonwealth's principal intergovernmental institution

Commonwealth Secretariat

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Marlborough House, London, the headquarters of the Commonwealth Secretariat, the Commonwealth's principal intergovernmental institution

The Commonwealth Secretariat is the main intergovernmental agency and central institution of the Commonwealth of Nations.

The republics in the Commonwealth of Nations, shown in red

Republics in the Commonwealth of Nations

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The republics in the Commonwealth of Nations, shown in red
Commonwealth of Nations member states
Commonwealth of Nations member state dependencies
Applied or interested non-member states, some of them without historic constitutional association
Non-member states that were British protectorates, colonies, mandates or under some other type of British administration

The republics in the Commonwealth of Nations are the sovereign states in the organisation with a republican form of government.

Formal photograph, c. 1940–1946

George VI

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Formal photograph, c. 1940–1946
Four kings: Edward VII (far right); his son George, Prince of Wales, later George V (far left); and grandsons Edward, later Edward VIII (rear); and Albert, later George VI (foreground), c. undefined 1908
Albert at an RAF dinner in 1919
The Duke and Duchess of York (centre, reading programmes) at Eagle Farm Racecourse, Brisbane, 1927
On the cover of Time, January 1925
Darlington Town Hall decorated for the coronation, 1937
Crown coin with George in profile, 1937
Cover of the 7 May 1937 edition of Radio Times, drawn by Christopher R. W. Nevinson, marking the first coronation to be broadcast, and partially televised, live
Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt with King George VI and Queen Elizabeth, on the USS Potomac, 9 June 1939
George VI (left) with Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery (right), near the front lines in the Netherlands, October 1944
King George VI and British prime minister Clement Attlee (left) at Buckingham Palace, July 1945
Statue of George VI at the King George VI and Queen Elizabeth Memorial in Carlton Gardens, London
Royal cypher (monogram), 1949

George VI (Albert Frederick Arthur George; 14 December 1895 – 6 February 1952) was King of the United Kingdom and the Dominions of the British Commonwealth from 11 December 1936 until his death in 1952.