Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act

CALEACommunications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act (CALEA)Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act of 1992Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act of 1994traffic access point
The Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act (CALEA), also known as the "Digital Telephony Act," is a United States wiretapping law passed in 1994, during the presidency of Bill Clinton (Pub. L. No. 103-414, 108 Stat. 4279, codified at 47 USC 1001-1010).wikipedia
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Lawful interception

lawful interceptcommunications interceptionintercept powers
CALEA's purpose is to enhance the ability of law enforcement agencies to conduct lawful interception of communication by requiring that telecommunications carriers and manufacturers of telecommunications equipment modify and design their equipment, facilities, and services to ensure that they have built-in capabilities for targeted surveillance, allowing federal agencies to selectively wiretap any telephone traffic; it has since been extended to cover broadband Internet and VoIP traffic.
In the USA, the comparable requirements are enabled by the Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act (CALEA), with the specific capabilities promulgated jointly by the Federal Communications Commission and the Department of Justice.

Federal Bureau of Investigation

FBIF.B.I.FBI Special Agent
The original reason for adopting CALEA was the Federal Bureau of Investigation's worry that increasing use of digital telephone exchange switches would make tapping phones at the phone company's central office harder and slower to execute, or in some cases impossible.
After Congress passed the Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act (CALEA, 1994), the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA, 1996), and the Economic Espionage Act (EEA, 1996), the FBI followed suit and underwent a technological upgrade in 1998, just as it did with its CART team in 1991.

Deep packet inspection

Deep Packet Inspection (DPI)DPIdeep packet insertion
Modern voice switches now have this capability built in, yet Internet equipment almost always requires some kind of intelligent deep packet inspection probe to get the job done.
Decades ago in a legacy telephone environment, this was met by creating a traffic access point (TAP) using an intercepting proxy server that connects to the government's surveillance equipment.

Mass surveillance

surveillance statesurveillance societysurveillance
Some government agencies argue that it covers mass surveillance of communications rather than just tapping specific lines and that not all CALEA-based access requires a warrant.
The Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act (CALEA) requires that all U.S. telecommunications and Internet service providers modify their networks to allow easy wiretapping of telephone, VoIP, and broadband Internet traffic.

Surveillance

electronic surveillancestakeoutmonitoring
Surveillance
In the United States for example, under the Communications Assistance For Law Enforcement Act, all phone calls and broadband Internet traffic (emails, web traffic, instant messaging, etc.) are required to be available for unimpeded real-time monitoring by federal law enforcement agencies.

Telephone tapping

wiretapwiretappingwiretaps
The Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act (CALEA), also known as the "Digital Telephony Act," is a United States wiretapping law passed in 1994, during the presidency of Bill Clinton (Pub. The Act obliges telecommunications companies to make it possible for law enforcement agencies to tap any phone conversations carried out over its networks, as well as making call detail records available.
In the U.S., telecommunications carriers are required by law to cooperate in the interception of communications for law enforcement purposes under the terms of Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act (CALEA).

Carnivore (software)

CarnivoreDCS1000FBI Carnivore program
Carnivore (FBI)
Communications Assistance For Law Enforcement Act

Voice over IP

VoIPvoice over Internet Protocolvoice-over-IP
In the years since CALEA was passed it has been greatly expanded to include all VoIP and broadband Internet traffic.
VoIP operators in the US are required to support local number portability; make service accessible to people with disabilities; pay regulatory fees, universal service contributions, and other mandated payments; and enable law enforcement authorities to conduct surveillance pursuant to the Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act (CALEA).

Digital Collection System Network

Red Hook
By 2007, the FBI had spent $39 million on its Digital Collection System Network (DCSNet) system, which collects, stores, indexes, and analyzes communications data.
DCS-3000 and "Red Hook" were first mentioned publicly in a March 2006 report from the United States Department of Justice Office of the Inspector General on the implementation of the Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act (CALEA).

Hepting v. AT&T

AT&T scandals
Hepting v. AT&T
In its amended complaint, the EFF seeks injunctive relief against AT&T continuing such surveillance and damages allowed under the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA), the Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act, and other U.S. laws.

NSA ANT catalog

catalog of high-tech gadgets and software developed by the NSAimplantsNSA's "implants
NSA ANT catalog
Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act - CALEA

Verint Systems

VerintVerint Systems Inc.
Verint
Verint's RELIANT software provides law enforcement agencies with the ability to monitor and analyze voice, video, and data for a "vast number of targets" on all types of large, complex computer networks, in order to collect evidence for CALEA wiretaps.

United States

American🇺🇸U.S.
The Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act (CALEA), also known as the "Digital Telephony Act," is a United States wiretapping law passed in 1994, during the presidency of Bill Clinton (Pub.

Presidency of Bill Clinton

Clinton administrationClintonadministration
The Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act (CALEA), also known as the "Digital Telephony Act," is a United States wiretapping law passed in 1994, during the presidency of Bill Clinton (Pub.

Law enforcement agency

law enforcementlaw enforcement agenciesfederal police
CALEA's purpose is to enhance the ability of law enforcement agencies to conduct lawful interception of communication by requiring that telecommunications carriers and manufacturers of telecommunications equipment modify and design their equipment, facilities, and services to ensure that they have built-in capabilities for targeted surveillance, allowing federal agencies to selectively wiretap any telephone traffic; it has since been extended to cover broadband Internet and VoIP traffic.

Targeted surveillance

targetedselectively wiretapsurveillance
CALEA's purpose is to enhance the ability of law enforcement agencies to conduct lawful interception of communication by requiring that telecommunications carriers and manufacturers of telecommunications equipment modify and design their equipment, facilities, and services to ensure that they have built-in capabilities for targeted surveillance, allowing federal agencies to selectively wiretap any telephone traffic; it has since been extended to cover broadband Internet and VoIP traffic.

Telephone exchange

exchangescentral officeexchange
The original reason for adopting CALEA was the Federal Bureau of Investigation's worry that increasing use of digital telephone exchange switches would make tapping phones at the phone company's central office harder and slower to execute, or in some cases impossible.

United States Congress

CongressU.S. CongressCongressional
Since the original requirement to add CALEA-compliant interfaces required phone companies to modify or replace hardware and software in their systems, U.S. Congress included funding for a limited time period to cover such network upgrades.

Internet access

broadband internetbroadbandbroadband Internet access
In the years since CALEA was passed it has been greatly expanded to include all VoIP and broadband Internet traffic.

Call detail record

call-detail recordCDRcall data
The Act obliges telecommunications companies to make it possible for law enforcement agencies to tap any phone conversations carried out over its networks, as well as making call detail records available.

United States Department of Justice

Department of JusticeJustice DepartmentU.S. Department of Justice
On March 10, 2004, the United States Department of Justice, FBI and Drug Enforcement Administration filed a "Joint Petition for Expedited Rulemaking" in which they requested certain steps to accelerate CALEA compliance, and to extend the provisions of CALEA to include the ability to perform surveillance of all communications that travel over the Internet such as Internet traffic and VoIP.

Drug Enforcement Administration

DEAD.E.A.DEA agent
On March 10, 2004, the United States Department of Justice, FBI and Drug Enforcement Administration filed a "Joint Petition for Expedited Rulemaking" in which they requested certain steps to accelerate CALEA compliance, and to extend the provisions of CALEA to include the ability to perform surveillance of all communications that travel over the Internet such as Internet traffic and VoIP.

Public switched telephone network

PSTNtelephone networkpublic telephone network
As a result, the FCC adopted a "First Report and Order" concluding that CALEA applies to facilities-based broadband Internet access providers and providers of interconnected (with the public switched telephone network) Voice-over-Internet-Protocol (VoIP) services.