Community (ecology)

community ecologycommunitycommunitiesecological communityecological communitiesnatural communitiesnatural communitysynecologybiological communitiescommunity assembly
In ecology, a community is a group or association of populations of two or more different species occupying the same geographical area and in a particular time, also known as a biocoenosis.wikipedia
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Biocoenosis

biotic communitycommunitiesbiocenosis
In ecology, a community is a group or association of populations of two or more different species occupying the same geographical area and in a particular time, also known as a biocoenosis.
A biocenosis (UK English, biocoenosis, also biocenose, biocoenose, biotic community, biological community, ecological community, life assemblage,) coined by Karl Möbius in 1877, describes the interacting organisms living together in a habitat (biotope).

Biological interaction

interactionEcological relationshipbiotic interactions
Community ecology or synecology is the study of the interactions between species in communities on many spatial and temporal scales, including the distribution, structure, abundance, demography, and interactions between coexisting populations.
In ecology, a biological interaction is the effect that a pair of organisms living together in a community have on each other.

Species richness

richnessspecies compositionspecies-rich
Modern community ecology examines patterns such as variation in species richness, equitability, productivity and food web structure (see community structure); it also examines processes such as predator–prey population dynamics, succession, and community assembly.
Species richness is the number of different species represented in an ecological community, landscape or region.

Food web

food websfood-webtrophic dynamics
Modern community ecology examines patterns such as variation in species richness, equitability, productivity and food web structure (see community structure); it also examines processes such as predator–prey population dynamics, succession, and community assembly.
A food web (or food cycle) is the natural interconnection of food chains and a graphical representation (usually an image) of what-eats-what in an ecological community.

Association (ecology)

associationassociationsvegetative association
In ecology, a community is a group or association of populations of two or more different species occupying the same geographical area and in a particular time, also known as a biocoenosis.
In phytosociology and community ecology an association is a type of ecological community with a predictable species composition, consistent physiognomy (structural appearance) which occurs in a particular habitat type.

Ecological succession

successionsuccessionalplant succession
Modern community ecology examines patterns such as variation in species richness, equitability, productivity and food web structure (see community structure); it also examines processes such as predator–prey population dynamics, succession, and community assembly.
Ecological succession is the process of change in the species structure of an ecological community over time.

Superorganism

superorganismscoordination of living organismsSuper Organism
Clements developed a holistic (or organismic) concept of community, as it was a superorganism or discrete unit, with sharp boundaries.
A community of synergetically interacting organisms of different species is called a holobiont.

Metacommunity

metacommunitiesmetacommunity dynamics
In the neutral theory view of the community (or metacommunity), popularized by Hubbell, species are functionally equivalent, and the abundance of a population of a species changes by stochastic demographic processes (i.e., random births and deaths).
An ecological metacommunity is a set of interacting communities which are linked by the dispersal of multiple, potentially interacting species.

Competition (biology)

competitioncompetecompetitors
Species can compete with each other for finite resources.
Competition both within and between species is an important topic in ecology, especially community ecology.

Robert Ricklefs

Robert E. Ricklefs
Robert Ricklefs has argued that it is more useful to think of communities on a regional scale, drawing on evolutionary taxonomy and biogeography, where some species or clades evolve and others go extinct.
Recent work has sought to rescale the concept of an ecological community.

Size-asymmetric competition

complete symmetricsize asymmetry of the competition
Size-asymmetric competition has major effects on population structure and diversity within ecological communities.

Productivity (ecology)

productivitysecondary productivityproductive
Modern community ecology examines patterns such as variation in species richness, equitability, productivity and food web structure (see community structure); it also examines processes such as predator–prey population dynamics, succession, and community assembly.

Deep sea community

Deep sea communitiesdeep seadeep sea ecosystem
A deep sea community is any community of organisms associated by a shared habitat in the deep sea.

Ecological effects of biodiversity

diversity and stabilitydiversity-stability hypothesisecological effects
The diversity of species and genes in ecological communities affects the functioning of these communities.

Limiting similarity

Limiting similarity (informally "limsim") is a concept in theoretical ecology and community ecology that proposes the existence of a maximum level of niche overlap between two given species that will allow continued coexistence.

R* rule (ecology)

R* ruleR*R* theory
The R* rule (also called the resource-ratio hypothesis) is a hypothesis in community ecology that attempts to predict which species will become dominant as the result of competition for resources.

Resource (biology)

resourcesresourcebiological resources
Species can compete with each other for finite resources.

Population ecology

populationautecologicalpopulation structure
It derives from the division of ecology into autecology—the study of individual species in relation to the environment—and synecology—the study of groups of organisms in relation to the environment—or community ecology.

Phage ecology

One-step growth experimentsPhage community ecologythe most numerous "organisms" on Earth
Community ecology studies those characteristics of communities that either are not apparent or which are much less apparent if a community consists of only a single population.

Universal adaptive strategy theory

CSR theoryUniversal adaptive strategy theory (UAST)C-S-R Triangle Theory
Understanding the differences between the CSR theory and its major alternative the R* theory has been a major goal in community ecology for many years.

Population

populationspopulacepopulated
In ecology, a community is a group or association of populations of two or more different species occupying the same geographical area and in a particular time, also known as a biocoenosis.

Species

specificspecific epithetspecific name
In ecology, a community is a group or association of populations of two or more different species occupying the same geographical area and in a particular time, also known as a biocoenosis.

Genotype

genotypesgenotypicgenotypically
The primary focus of community ecology is on the interactions between populations as determined by specific genotypic and phenotypic characteristics.

Phenotype

phenotypicphenotypesphenotypically
The primary focus of community ecology is on the interactions between populations as determined by specific genotypic and phenotypic characteristics.