Company rule in India

IndiaBritish IndiaCompany RuleCompany Rajrule in IndiaBritishruleEast India Company ruleEast India CompanyBritish East India Company
Company rule in India (sometimes, Company Raj, "raj, lit. "rule" in Hindi ) is the rule or dominion of the British East India Company over parts of the Indian subcontinent.wikipedia
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Indian Rebellion of 1857

Indian MutinyIndian RebellionSepoy Mutiny
The Company's rule lasted until 1858, when it was abolished after the Indian Rebellion of 1857.
The Indian Rebellion of 1857 was a major, but ultimately unsuccessful, uprising in India in 1857–58 against the rule of the British East India Company, which functioned as a sovereign power on behalf of the British Crown.

British Raj

British IndiaIndiaBritish rule
With the Government of India Act 1858, the British government assumed the task of administering India in the new British Raj.
This system of governance was instituted on 28 June 1858, when, after the Indian Rebellion of 1857, the rule of the British East India Company was transferred to the Crown in the person of Queen Victoria (who, in 1876, was proclaimed Empress of India).

Mughal Empire

MughalMughalsMughal India
The area encompassed by modern India was significantly fractured following the decline of the Mughal Empire in the first half of the 18th century
The empire subsequently fragmented, reduced to the region in and around Old Delhi by the time the British East India Company came to rule most of India.

India

IndianRepublic of IndiaIND
The area encompassed by modern India was significantly fractured following the decline of the Mughal Empire in the first half of the 18th century
Gradually expanding rule of the British East India Company followed, turning India into a colonial economy, but also consolidating its sovereignty.

Princely state

princely statesIndian Princely Statesprincely
Subsidiary alliances created the princely states, of the Hindu maharajas and the Muslim nawabs.
In general the term "British India" had been used (and is still used) also to refer to the regions under the rule of the East India Company in India from 1774 to 1858.

Bengal

Bengal regionBengal, IndiaBengali
Company rule in India (sometimes, Company Raj, "raj, lit. "rule" in Hindi ) is the rule or dominion of the British East India Company over parts of the Indian subcontinent. This is variously taken to have commenced in 1757, after the Battle of Plassey, when the "puppet" Nawab of Bengal Mir Jafar ceded revenues to the Company; in 1765, when the Company was granted the diwani, or the right to collect revenue, in Bengal and Bihar; or in 1773, when the Company established a capital in Calcutta, appointed its first Governor-General, Warren Hastings, and became directly involved in governance, . By 1818, with the defeat of Marathas followed by the pensioning of the Peshwa and the annexation of his territories, British supremacy in India was complete.
Company rule in India began under the Bengal Presidency.

Government of India Act 1858

Government of India Act1858a proclamation issued by Queen Victoria
With the Government of India Act 1858, the British government assumed the task of administering India in the new British Raj.
The Act ushered in a new period of Indian history, bringing about the end of Company rule in India.

Ceded and Conquered Provinces

Ceded Provinces
With the constituting of the Ceded and Conquered Provinces in 1805, the jurisdiction would extend as far west as Delhi.
The Ceded and Conquered Provinces constituted a region in northern India that was ruled by the British East India Company from 1805 to 1834; it corresponded approximately—in present-day India—to all regions in Uttar Pradesh state with the exception of the Lucknow and Faizabad divisions of Awadh; in addition, it included the Delhi territory and, after 1816, the Kumaun division and a large part of the Garhwal division of present-day Uttarakhand state.

First Anglo-Afghan War

First Afghan WarAfghanistanFirst
The First Anglo-Afghan War (also known by the British as the Disaster in Afghanistan) was fought between the British East India Company and the Emirate of Afghanistan from 1839 to 1842.

Warren Hastings

HastingsLord Warren Hastingsstage version
Company rule in India (sometimes, Company Raj, "raj, lit. "rule" in Hindi ) is the rule or dominion of the British East India Company over parts of the Indian subcontinent. This is variously taken to have commenced in 1757, after the Battle of Plassey, when the "puppet" Nawab of Bengal Mir Jafar ceded revenues to the Company; in 1765, when the Company was granted the diwani, or the right to collect revenue, in Bengal and Bihar; or in 1773, when the Company established a capital in Calcutta, appointed its first Governor-General, Warren Hastings, and became directly involved in governance, . By 1818, with the defeat of Marathas followed by the pensioning of the Peshwa and the annexation of his territories, British supremacy in India was complete.
In 1785, after ten years of service, during which he helped extend and regularise the nascent Raj created by Clive of India, Hastings resigned.

Agra famine of 1837–38

1838
However, after the Agra famine of 1837–38, during which the East India Company's administration spent Rs. 2,300,000 on famine relief, the idea of a canal became more attractive to the Company's budget-conscious Court of Directors.
The Agra famine of 1837–1838 was a famine in the newly established North-Western Provinces (formerly Ceded and Conquered Provinces) of Company-ruled India that affected an area of 25000 sqmi and a population of 8 million people.

James Broun-Ramsay, 1st Marquess of Dalhousie

Lord DalhousieThe Earl of DalhousieMarquess of Dalhousie
The petitions resulted in the Education Dispatch of July 1854 sent by Sir Charles Wood, the President of the Board of Control of the East India Company, the chief official on Indian affairs in the British government, to Lord Dalhousie, the then Governor-General of India.
To his supporters he stands out as the far-sighted Governor-General who consolidated East India Company rule in India, laid the foundations of its later administration, and by his sound policy enabled his successors to stem the tide of rebellion.

Cornwallis Code

The Cornwallis Code is a body of legislation enacted in 1793 by the East India Company to improve the governance of its territories in India.

Thuggee and Dacoity Suppression Acts, 1836–48

Thuggee and Dacoity Suppression Acts, 1836–1848
The Thuggee and Dacoity Suppression Acts, 1836–48 in British India under East India Company rule were a series of legal acts that outlawed thugee—a practice in North and Central India involving robbery and ritualized murder and mutilation on highways—and dacoity, a form of banditry prevalent in the same region, and prescribed punishment for the same.

Bengal Sati Regulation, 1829

The Bengal Sati Regulation, or Regulation XVII, in India under East India Company rule, by the Governor-General Lord William Bentinck, which made the practice of sati or suttee illegal in all jurisdictions of India and subject to prosecution.

Regulating Act of 1773

Regulating ActEast India Company Act 1772had been created
The British parliament then held several inquiries and in 1773, during the premiership of Lord North, enacted the Regulating Act, which established regulations, its long title stated, "for the better Management of the Affairs of the East India Company, as well in India as in Europe"
The Regulating Act of 1773 (formally, the East India Company Act 1772) was an Act of the Parliament of Great Britain intended to overhaul the management of the East India Company's rule in India.

East India Company

British East India CompanyHonourable East India CompanyEnglish East India Company
Company rule in India (sometimes, Company Raj, "raj, lit. "rule" in Hindi ) is the rule or dominion of the British East India Company over parts of the Indian subcontinent. This is variously taken to have commenced in 1757, after the Battle of Plassey, when the "puppet" Nawab of Bengal Mir Jafar ceded revenues to the Company; in 1765, when the Company was granted the diwani, or the right to collect revenue, in Bengal and Bihar; or in 1773, when the Company established a capital in Calcutta, appointed its first Governor-General, Warren Hastings, and became directly involved in governance, . By 1818, with the defeat of Marathas followed by the pensioning of the Peshwa and the annexation of his territories, British supremacy in India was complete.
The company ended up seizing control of large parts of the Indian subcontinent, colonised parts of Southeast Asia, and colonised Hong Kong after a war with Qing China.

Suzerainty

suzerainBritish Paramountcysuzerains
The British East India Company conquered Bengal in 1757, and gradually extended its control over the whole of India.

Indian Slavery Act, 1843

Indian Slavery Act of 1843
The Indian Slavery Act, 1843, also known as Act V of 1843, was an act passed in British India under East India Company rule, which outlawed many economical transactions associated with slavery.

Nawabs of Bengal and Murshidabad

Nawab of BengalNawabs of BengalNawab of Murshidabad
Company rule in India (sometimes, Company Raj, "raj, lit. "rule" in Hindi ) is the rule or dominion of the British East India Company over parts of the Indian subcontinent. This is variously taken to have commenced in 1757, after the Battle of Plassey, when the "puppet" Nawab of Bengal Mir Jafar ceded revenues to the Company; in 1765, when the Company was granted the diwani, or the right to collect revenue, in Bengal and Bihar; or in 1773, when the Company established a capital in Calcutta, appointed its first Governor-General, Warren Hastings, and became directly involved in governance, . By 1818, with the defeat of Marathas followed by the pensioning of the Peshwa and the annexation of his territories, British supremacy in India was complete.
After the Revolt of 1857, Company rule in India ended, and all territories under the control of the Company came under direct control of the British Crown in 1858, marking the beginning of the British Raj.

Impeachment of Warren Hastings

impeachmentimpeachment proceedingstrial of Warren Hastings
British political opinion was also shaped by the attempted Impeachment of Warren Hastings; the trial, whose proceedings began in 1788, ended with Hastings' acquittal, in 1795.
The prosecution was led by Edmund Burke and became a wider debate about the role of the East India Company and the expanding empire in India.

Sati (practice)

satisutteesati-daha
The Raj set out to outlaw sati (widow-burning) and thuggee (ritual banditry) and upgrade the status of women.
In the early 19th century, the British East India Company, in the process of extending its rule to most of India, initially tolerated the practice; William Carey, a Christian evangelist, noted 438 incidences within a 30-mile (48-km) radius of the capital Calcutta, in 1803, despite its ban within Calcutta.

Maratha Empire

MarathaMarathasMaratha Confederacy
With the defeat of the Marathas, no native power represented a threat for the Company any longer.
During the 19th and 20th centuries, when Maratha principalities ruled as a feudatory of the British, Maratha rulers built palaces, contributed towards fine arts, introduced social reforms, and developed civic amenities in their territories.

Pitt's India Act

East India Company Act 1784India ActIndia Act of 1784
Pitt's India Act of 1784 gave the British government effective control of the private company for the first time.
The East India Company Act (EIC Act 1784), also known as Pitt's India Act, was an Act of the Parliament of Great Britain intended to address the shortcomings of the Regulating Act of 1773 by bringing the East India Company's rule in India under the control of the British Government.

Rohilkhand

KateharRohilakhandKatehir
The annexed regions included the North-Western Provinces (comprising Rohilkhand, Gorakhpur, and the Doab) (1801), Delhi (1803), Assam (Ahom Kingdom 1828), and Sindh (1843).
Foreseeing the same fate as Rohilla, Nawab made frantic calls to British troops in Bengal.