Compatible Time-Sharing System

CTSSCompatible Time Sharing System
The Compatible Time-Sharing System (CTSS) was one of the first time-sharing operating systems; it was developed at the MIT Computation Center.wikipedia
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Time-sharing

timesharingtime sharingtime-sharing system
The Compatible Time-Sharing System (CTSS) was one of the first time-sharing operating systems; it was developed at the MIT Computation Center.
One of the deliverables of the project, known as the Compatible Time-Sharing System or CTSS, was demonstrated in November 1961.

MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory

Project MACMIT Artificial Intelligence LaboratoryComputer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory
During part of this time, MIT's influential Project MAC also ran a CTSS service, but the system did not spread beyond these two sites.
To this end, Corbató brought the first computer time-sharing system, Compatible Time-Sharing System (CTSS), with him from the MIT Computation Center, using the DARPA funding to purchase an IBM 7094 for research use.

Debugging

debugdebuggedanti-debugging
In June 1959, Christopher Strachey published a paper "Time Sharing in Large Fast Computers" at the UNESCO Information Processing Conference in Paris, where he envisaged a programmer debugging a program at a console (like a teletype) connected to the computer, while another program was running in the computer at the same time.
By 1963 "debugging" was a common enough term to be mentioned in passing without explanation on page 1 of the CTSS manual.

TYPSET and RUNOFF

RUNOFFRUNOFF commandCTSS RUNOFF
The original RUNOFF type-setting program for CTSS was written by Jerome H. Saltzer.

Fernando J. Corbató

Fernando J. CorbatoF. J. CorbatóFernando Corbato
By July, 1961 a few time sharing commands had become operational on the Computation Center's IBM 709, and in November 1961, Fernando J. Corbató demonstrated at MIT what was called the "Experimental Time-Sharing System".
The first time-sharing system he was associated with was known as the MIT Compatible Time-Sharing System (CTSS), an early version of which was demonstrated in 1961.

Run commands

RUNCOM.rcRC
It is believed to have originated sometime in 1965 at a runcom facility from the MIT Compatible Time-Sharing System (CTSS).

John McCarthy (computer scientist)

John McCarthyMcCarthyMcCarthy, John
John McCarthy wrote a memo about that at MIT, after which a preliminary study committee and a working committee were established at MIT, to develop time sharing.
McCarthy was instrumental in creation of three of the very earliest time-sharing systems (Compatible Time-Sharing System, BBN Time-Sharing System, and Dartmouth Time Sharing System).

Joint Computer Conference

Fall Joint Computer ConferenceNational Computer ConferenceSpring Joint Computer Conference
CTSS was described in a paper presented at the 1962 Spring Joint Computer Conference, and greatly influenced the design of other early time-sharing systems.

Louis Pouzin

Having participated in the design of the Compatible Time-Sharing System (CTSS), Pouzin wrote a program called RUNCOM around 1963–64.

QED (text editor)

QEDFRED (text editor)QED editor
Ken Thompson later wrote a version for CTSS; this version was notable for introducing regular expressions.

Computer file

filefilescomputer files
Each file had two names, the second name was similar to extension today.
The introduction, circa 1961, by the Burroughs MCP and the MIT Compatible Time-Sharing System of the concept of a "file system" that managed several virtual "files" on one storage device is the origin of the contemporary denotation of the word.

Ken Thompson

Kenneth Lane ThompsonK. ThompsonKen L. Thompson
Thompson had developed the CTSS version of the editor QED, which included regular expressions for searching text.

MAD (programming language)

MADGOMGood Old MAD
CTSS at first had only an assembler FAP and a compiler MAD.
It was widely used to teach programming at colleges and universities during the 1960s and played a minor role in the development of CTSS, Multics, and the Michigan Terminal System computer operating systems.

Incompatible Timesharing System

ITSITS operating systemIncompatible Time-sharing System
Incompatible Timesharing System (ITS), another early, revolutionary, and influential MIT time-sharing system, was produced by people who disagreed with the direction taken by CTSS, and later, Multics; the name was a parody of "CTSS", as later the name "Unix" was a parody of "Multics".
The name is the jocular complement of the MIT Compatible Time-Sharing System (CTSS).

Glenda Schroeder

Working with Pat Crisman and Louis Pouzin, she also described an early e-mail system called "MAIL" to allow users on the Compatible Time-Sharing System (CTSS) at MIT to send notifications to others about backups of files.

IBM 7090

IBM 709470907094
The system used an IBM 7090, modified by Herbert M. Teager, with added 3 Flexowriters for user consoles, and maybe a timer.

Command-line interface

command linecommand-linecommand line interface
Around 1964 Louis Pouzin introduced the concept and the name shell in Multics, building on earlier, simpler facilities in the Compatible Time-Sharing System (CTSS).

Operating system

operating systemsOScomputer operating system
The Compatible Time-Sharing System (CTSS) was one of the first time-sharing operating systems; it was developed at the MIT Computation Center.

MIT Computation Center

M.I.T. Computation Center
The Compatible Time-Sharing System (CTSS) was one of the first time-sharing operating systems; it was developed at the MIT Computation Center.

IBM 709

709
CTSS was first demonstrated on MIT's IBM 709 in November 1961; service to MIT users began in the summer of 1963 and was operated until 1973.

John Backus

John W. BackusBackusBackus, John
John Backus said in the 1954 summer session at MIT that "By time sharing, a big computer could be used as several small ones; there would need to be a reading station for each user".

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

MITM.I.T.Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)
John Backus said in the 1954 summer session at MIT that "By time sharing, a big computer could be used as several small ones; there would need to be a reading station for each user".