Argument terminology used in logic
Charles Babbage, sometimes referred to as the "father of computing".
Structure of the syntactically well-formed, although nonsensical, English sentence, "Colorless green ideas sleep furiously" (historical example from Chomsky 1957).
Aristotle, 384–322 BCE.
Ada Lovelace published the first algorithm intended for processing on a computer.
This diagram shows the syntactic divisions within a formal system. Strings of symbols may be broadly divided into nonsense and well-formed formulas. The set of well-formed formulas is divided into theorems and non-theorems.
A depiction from the 15th century of the square of opposition, which expresses the fundamental dualities of syllogistic.

In logic, mathematics, computer science, and linguistics, a formal language consists of words whose letters are taken from an alphabet and are well-formed according to a specific set of rules.

- Formal language

One prominent approach associates their difference with the study of arguments expressed in formal or informal languages.

- Logic

Logic is studied in and applied to various fields, such as philosophy, mathematics, computer science, and linguistics.

- Logic

Computer science research also often intersects other disciplines, such as cognitive science, linguistics, mathematics, physics, biology, Earth science, statistics, philosophy, and logic.

- Computer science

Formal methods are best described as the application of a fairly broad variety of theoretical computer science fundamentals, in particular logic calculi, formal languages, automata theory, and program semantics, but also type systems and algebraic data types to problems in software and hardware specification and verification.

- Computer science
Argument terminology used in logic

2 related topics with Alpha

Overall

The source code for a simple computer program written in the C programming language. The gray lines are comments that help explain the program to humans in a natural language. When compiled and run, it will give the output "Hello, world!".

Programming language

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The source code for a simple computer program written in the C programming language. The gray lines are comments that help explain the program to humans in a natural language. When compiled and run, it will give the output "Hello, world!".
A selection of programming language textbooks; only a few of the thousands available.
Parse tree of Python code with inset tokenization
Syntax highlighting is often used to aid programmers in recognizing elements of source code. The language above is Python.

A programming language is any set of rules that converts strings, or graphical program elements in the case of visual programming languages, to various kinds of machine code output.

Programming language theory is a subfield of computer science that deals with the design, implementation, analysis, characterization, and classification of programming languages.

Many important restrictions of this type, like checking that identifiers are used in the appropriate context (e.g. not adding an integer to a function name), or that subroutine calls have the appropriate number and type of arguments, can be enforced by defining them as rules in a logic called a type system.

Mathematical logic

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Mathematical logic is the study of formal logic within mathematics.

These systems, though they differ in many details, share the common property of considering only expressions in a fixed formal language.

Computer scientists often focus on concrete programming languages and feasible computability, while researchers in mathematical logic often focus on computability as a theoretical concept and on noncomputability.