Concerto

concerticoncertosconcertanteBaroque concertocello concertosconcert musicconcerto formconcerto structureconcerto stylemusical composition
A concerto (plural concertos, or concerti from the Italian plural) is a musical composition generally composed of three movements, in which, either one solo instrument (for instance, a piano, violin, cello or flute), or a group of soloists (concertino) is accompanied by an orchestra or concert band.wikipedia
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Arcangelo Corelli

CorelliCorelli schoolCORELLI, ARCANGELO
The concerto began to take its modern shape in the late-Baroque period, beginning with the concerto grosso form developed by Arcangelo Corelli.
His music was key in the development of the modern genres of sonata and concerto, in establishing the preeminence of the violin, and as the first coalescing of modern tonality and functional harmony.

Antonio Vivaldi

VivaldiAntonio Lucio VivaldiA. Vivaldi
The main composers of concertos of the baroque were Tommaso Albinoni, Antonio Vivaldi, Georg Philipp Telemann, Johann Sebastian Bach, George Frideric Handel, Pietro Locatelli, Jean-Marie Leclair, Giuseppe Tartini, Francesco Geminiani and Johann Joachim Quantz.
He composed many instrumental concertos, for the violin and a variety of other instruments, as well as sacred choral works and more than forty operas.

Orchestra

symphony orchestraorchestralchamber orchestra
A concerto (plural concertos, or concerti from the Italian plural) is a musical composition generally composed of three movements, in which, either one solo instrument (for instance, a piano, violin, cello or flute), or a group of soloists (concertino) is accompanied by an orchestra or concert band.
Orchestras play a wide range of repertoire, including symphonies, opera and ballet overtures, concertos for solo instruments, and as pit ensembles for operas, ballets, and some types of musical theatre (e.g., Gilbert and Sullivan operettas).

Sonata form

sonata-allegro formsonata-allegrodevelopment
It is conventional to state that the first movements of concertos from the Classical period onwards follow the structure of sonata form.
After its establishment, the sonata form became the most common form in the first movement of works entitled "sonata", as well as other long works of classical music, including the symphony, concerto, string quartet, and so on.

Baroque music

BaroqueBaroque eraBaroque period
The concerto, as understood in this modern way, arose in the Baroque period, in parallel to the concerto grosso, which contrasted a small group of instruments called a concertino with the rest of the orchestra, called the ripieno.
Baroque music expanded the size, range, and complexity of instrumental performance, and also established the mixed vocal/instrumental forms of opera, cantata and oratorio and the instrumental forms of the solo concerto and sonata as musical genres.

Concerto for Flute, Harp, and Orchestra (Mozart)

Concerto for Flute, Harp, and OrchestraConcerto for Flute and Harp297c
2), clarinet, and bassoon, four for horn, a Concerto for Flute, Harp, and Orchestra, and Exsultate, jubilate, a de facto concerto for soprano voice.
299/297c, is a concerto by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart for flute, harp, and orchestra.

Cello

cellistvioloncellocellos
A concerto (plural concertos, or concerti from the Italian plural) is a musical composition generally composed of three movements, in which, either one solo instrument (for instance, a piano, violin, cello or flute), or a group of soloists (concertino) is accompanied by an orchestra or concert band. The Baroque concerto was mainly for a string instrument (violin, viola, cello, seldom viola d'amore or harp) or a wind instrument (flute, recorder, oboe, bassoon, horn, or trumpet,).
There are also cello concertos, which are orchestral pieces that feature a solo cellist accompanied by an entire orchestra.

Musical composition

compositionmusic compositioncomposing
A concerto (plural concertos, or concerti from the Italian plural) is a musical composition generally composed of three movements, in which, either one solo instrument (for instance, a piano, violin, cello or flute), or a group of soloists (concertino) is accompanied by an orchestra or concert band.
If music is composed before being performed, music can be performed from memory (the norm for instrumental soloists in concerto performances and singers in opera shows and art song recitals), by reading written musical notation (the norm in large ensembles, such as orchestras, concert bands and choirs), or through a combination of both methods.

Dmitri Shostakovich

ShostakovichDmitry ShostakovichDimitri Shostakovich
Today's 'core' repertoire—performed the most of any cello concertos—are by Elgar, Dvořák, Saint-Saëns, Haydn, Shostakovich and Schumann, but many more concertos are performed nearly as often (see below: cello concertos in the 20th century).
Shostakovich's orchestral works include 15 symphonies and six concerti.

Variations on a Rococo Theme

Rococo VariationsTchaikovsky Variations on a Rococo ThemeTchaikovsky's ''Variations on a Rococo Theme
Tchaikovsky's contribution to the genre is a series of Variations on a Rococo Theme.
33, for cello and orchestra was the closest Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky ever came to writing a full concerto for cello and orchestra.

Sinfonia Concertante for Violin, Viola and Orchestra (Mozart)

Sinfonia ConcertanteSinfonia Concertante for Violin, Viola and OrchestraSinfonia concertante for Violin and Viola
Mozart also wrote the highly regarded Sinfonia Concertante for violin, viola, and orchestra.
Mozart had been experimenting with the sinfonia concertante genre and this work can be considered his most successful realization in this cross-over genre between symphony and concerto.

Oboe Concerto (Mozart)

Oboe ConcertoFlute Concerto No. 2Oboe Concerto in C Major
Mozart wrote one concerto each for flute, oboe (later rearranged for flute and known as Flute Concerto No.
In 1778, Mozart re-worked it as a concerto for flute in D major.

Piano Concerto No. 2 (Rachmaninoff)

Piano Concerto No. 2Second Piano ConcertoPiano Concerto No. 2 in C Minor
His Second and Third, being the most popular of the four, went on to become among the most famous in the piano repertoire.
18, is a concerto for piano and orchestra composed by Sergei Rachmaninoff between the autumn of 1900 and April 1901.

Oboe concerto

concerto for oboeconcertos for oboeoboe
Masterpieces were written by Edward Elgar (a violin concerto and a cello concerto), Sergei Rachmaninoff and Nikolai Medtner (four and three piano concertos, respectively), Jean Sibelius (a violin concerto), Frederick Delius (a violin concerto, a cello concerto, a piano concerto and a double concerto for violin and cello), Karol Szymanowski (two violin concertos and a "Symphonie Concertante" for piano), and Richard Strauss (two horn concertos, a violin concerto, Don Quixote—a tone poem that features the cello as a soloist—and among later works, an oboe concerto).
A number of concertos (as well as non-concerto works) have been written for the oboe, both as a solo instrument as well as in conjunction with other solo instrument(s), and accompanied by string orchestra, chamber orchestra, full orchestra, concert band, or similar large ensemble.

Piano Concerto No. 3 (Rachmaninoff)

Piano Concerto No. 3Piano Concerto No. 3 in D minorThird Piano Concerto
His Second and Third, being the most popular of the four, went on to become among the most famous in the piano repertoire.
Following the form of a standard concerto, the piece is in three movements:

Accompaniment

accompanistaccompaniedaccompanying
A concerto (plural concertos, or concerti from the Italian plural) is a musical composition generally composed of three movements, in which, either one solo instrument (for instance, a piano, violin, cello or flute), or a group of soloists (concertino) is accompanied by an orchestra or concert band.
Alternatively, the accompaniment to a vocal melody or instrumental solo can be provided by a musical ensemble, ranging in size from a duo (e.g., cello and piano; guitar and double bass; synthesizer and percussion); a trio (e.g., a rock power trio of electric guitar, electric bass and drum kit; an organ trio); a quartet (e.g., a string quartet in Classical music can accompany a solo singer; a rock band or rhythm section in rock and pop; a jazz quartet in jazz); all the way to larger ensembles, such as concert bands, Big Bands (in jazz), pit orchestras in musical theatre; and orchestras, which, in addition to playing symphonies, can also provide accompaniment to a concerto solo instrumentalist or to solo singers in opera.

List of double concertos for violin and cello

Double Concerto for Violin and Cellodouble concerto
Masterpieces were written by Edward Elgar (a violin concerto and a cello concerto), Sergei Rachmaninoff and Nikolai Medtner (four and three piano concertos, respectively), Jean Sibelius (a violin concerto), Frederick Delius (a violin concerto, a cello concerto, a piano concerto and a double concerto for violin and cello), Karol Szymanowski (two violin concertos and a "Symphonie Concertante" for piano), and Richard Strauss (two horn concertos, a violin concerto, Don Quixote—a tone poem that features the cello as a soloist—and among later works, an oboe concerto).
Please see the related entries for concerto, cello and cello concerto for discussion of typical forms and topics.

Bassoon

bassoonsbassoonistfagotto
The Baroque concerto was mainly for a string instrument (violin, viola, cello, seldom viola d'amore or harp) or a wind instrument (flute, recorder, oboe, bassoon, horn, or trumpet,).
Antonio Vivaldi brought the bassoon to prominence by featuring it in 37 concerti for the instrument.

Piano Concerto No. 1 (Brahms)

Piano Concerto No. 1First Piano ConcertoPiano Concerto No. 1 in D minor
Brahms's First Piano Concerto in D minor (pub 1861) was the result of an immense amount of work on a mass of material originally intended for a symphony.
The result was a work in the more usual three-movement concerto structure.

Rondo

rondo formRondeaurondeaux
Final movements are often in rondo form, as in J.S. Bach's E Major Violin Concerto.
Cedric Thorpe Davie is one author, however, who considers the ritornello form the ancestor, not of the rondo form, but of the classical concerto form (which also occurs, as a form, in many a classical-era aria.)

Philip Glass

GlassPhillip GlassGlass, Philip
Other composers of major violin concertos include John Adams, Samuel Barber, Benjamin Britten, Peter Maxwell Davies, Miguel del Aguila, Philip Glass, Cristóbal Halffter, György Ligeti, Frank Martin, Bohuslav Martinů, Carl Nielsen, Walter Piston, Alfred Schnittke, Jean Sibelius, Ralph Vaughan Williams, William Walton,
He has written numerous operas and musical theatre works, twelve symphonies, eleven concertos, eight string quartets and various other chamber music, and film scores.

John Williams

Johnny WilliamsJohn T. WilliamsWilliams
John Williams and Roger Sessions.
Williams has also composed numerous classical concertos and other works for orchestral ensembles and solo instruments.

Trumpet Concerto (Haydn)

Trumpet ConcertoTrumpet Concerto in E flat majorHaydn's Trumpet Concerto
Haydn wrote an important trumpet concerto and a Sinfonia Concertante for violin, cello, oboe and bassoon as well as two horn concertos.
The work is composed in three movements (typical of a Classical period concerto), they are marked as followed:

Baroque

Baroque styleBaroque eraBaroque period
The concerto began to take its modern shape in the late-Baroque period, beginning with the concerto grosso form developed by Arcangelo Corelli.
New forms were invented, including the concerto and sinfonia.

Joseph Jongen

JongenJongen, JosephJ.Jongen
The instrument was also popular with composers of the Franco-Belgian tradition: Saint-Saëns and Vieuxtemps wrote two cello concertos each and Lalo and Jongen one.
From his teens to his seventies Jongen composed a great deal, including symphonies, concertos (for cello, for piano and for harp), chamber music (notably a late string trio and three string quartets), and songs, some with piano, others with orchestra.